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Messages - riceral

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1
All Things Food / Re: What’s cooking for Father’s Day Sunday?
« on: June 17, 2018, 09:19:35 PM »
Project complete!


Looking good JT.

Thanks for the earlier email and recipes.



2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Vindication for us non-rehydrators
« on: June 17, 2018, 01:06:51 AM »
I've fermented a Helles lager at 68-70°F and it was delicious!

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk


Cool, thanks guys.  In the summer my IC even with prechiller can't get me to lager temp, takes several hours in the fridge to get all the way down.  Sounds like I can pitch 34/70 at room temperature,  and move it into the fermentation chamber, and not really worry how cool I set it.   Rediscovering dry yeast has me kind of giddy.  Takes the hassle out of brewing and puts the emphasis back on fun, creativity, spontaneity.
Until I recently acquired a chest freezer, all my fermentation control crapped out during a move. No clue why but both my fridges worked when I unplugged them and loaded them on the uhaul and didn't work when I plugged them back in.

OK, I know this might sound off the wall, but----

Maybe it's the outlet that isn't working.

Just a thought.

3
I saving them up so I can listen to them on the plane flight to Portland.

Something to spend time on during the long flight from Atlanta.

4
I've noticed a remarkable improvement in the "fresh" malt flavor of my pale lagers since I switched to short, low-intensity boils (just 4-5% evap. rate.) I don't expect that this alone has had any great effect on reducing oxidation potential (though while I don't do LODO, I am nonetheless careful not to gratuitously introduce HSA.)  But if such boiling procedure is a part of your overall LODO program, you are getting this individual benefit. Reducing the thermal loading will benefit all worts, and it is quite beneficial in itself to pale worts, even without further LODO measures.  Each brewer must evaluate which parts of the whole are most significant in their own, unique situation.

If you will be at NHC/HomebrewCon, this might be of interest:

      Boil Pro: What Homebrewers Can Learn from Pros on Wort Boiling
      Friday, June 29   10:15 AM - 11:15 AM
      Track: Brewing Process
      Speaker(s): Martin Brungard
      Location: Oregon Ballroom 202
   Boiling sterilizes wort, drives off unpleasant compounds, coagulates proteins, and isomerizes hop acids, all of which are critical for producing great beer. While homebrewers have been told for years that a vigorous boil is desirable, long and vigorous boils are neither necessary nor desirable for producing high-quality beer. This presentation looks at techniques and technologies that pro brewers have used for decades and explains why the popular homebrewing lore of boiling wort long and hard isn’t always best for beer.

Then there is this one right before Martin's:

        How to Brew with Low O2
        Friday, June 29   9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
        Track: Brewing Process
       Speaker(s): John Watt Scott McCormick
        Location: Portland Ballroom 252-253
     This seminar discusses the myths, benefits, and techniques of low oxygen brewing (LODO). From hot-side aeration and flavor preservation to shelf stability, you’ll learn why you should care about keeping oxygen out of your beer at all stages of the process. Come discover why there is growing interest in this approach.



5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New Brewer - why do you homebrew
« on: May 07, 2018, 01:48:12 PM »
Similar to ethinson, my wife got me into homebrewing. I was interested in learning and my wife bought me a starter kit for my birthday. And it grew from there--- extract to all-grain; kits to developing my own recipes (which I'm still learning); experimenting and exploring new styles. Well, new for me at least.

In addition to being able to make something that gives me pleasure and I can share with others, I can make and drink something that I can't get around here (Gainesville, Fl). I had been reading about altbiers and wanted to try one. No one in the area sold alts so the only thing left to do was to make one. Same thing with Kentucky Common and Grodzisckie.   


6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: One brew that is a must.
« on: May 05, 2018, 12:31:07 PM »
It's simple, but involves several hours of standing and constantly stirring at the stove.  Simple doesn't necessarily mean easy.

He says it usually takes 25 minutes or so. Perhaps he starts with less water than is typical.
Check out Ron's instructions. (I'm sure they're on the blog somewhere too.) After the inversion is achieved and correct temperature is reached, he says 20-30 min gets the color for no. 1.  Up to 300 minutes (again after the initial phases) for no. 4. Your friend may be getting the right sugar profile, but not the color.  Lyle's is always the easy option for no. 1. I wonder if some combination of some other sugar plus colorant like Sinamar could come close to the effect of the others, which look like the real PITA to make.  But that's way off topic in this thread, sorry.

Still off the main topic but on the recent comment--

Here's a link to a dilution method using blackstrap molasses:  http://www.unholymess.com/blog/beer-brewing-info/making-brewers-invert

Full disclosure---I haven't used this method so I can't speak to results


7
Beer Recipes / Re: Modern Times Fraxos Recipe Formulation
« on: April 15, 2018, 01:21:10 PM »
Maybe replace some of the base malt with a little sugar. Use enough to keep the ABV the same but this should lower the FG.

I know sugar isn't listed as an ingredient but just a passing thought. Also, I use BS and find sometimes the predicted FG isn't what I end up at. It's an estimation and I try to keep that in mind.


8
I might just have to take you up on the offer to visit.

I have been looking at the Mecca Grade malts and wishing I could get some. Why do I say wishing? Well, 5 pounds of the Lamonta pale malt would cost $11.75. Not bad. But shipping to Florida would cost an additional $37.90!

Maybe I'll visit and buy a couple of pounds of the pale, some wheat, and some opal 44. Sure would be less expensive to buy them while in Portland and carry back home in my baggage.What I save in shipping goes for more malt.

It's not an inexpensive malt, even without shipping, and they recognize that.

I agree Denny. I've been looking forward to trying these malts but can't quite pull the trigger on buying some when the cost of shipping is (what?) 3-4 times the cost of the malt. Been looking forward to trying Mecca Grade since you and Drew talked about it on the podcast.

Walking to the shop or taking Uber when I get in Wednesday afternoon and picking up some malt would be worth it though.


9
I might just have to take you up on the offer to visit.

I have been looking at the Mecca Grade malts and wishing I could get some. Why do I say wishing? Well, 5 pounds of the Lamonta pale malt would cost $11.75. Not bad. But shipping to Florida would cost an additional $37.90!

Maybe I'll visit and buy a couple of pounds of the pale, some wheat, and some opal 44. Sure would be less expensive to buy them while in Portland and carry back home in my baggage.What I save in shipping goes for more malt.


10
it was nice, it feels smooth, it tastes really fruity, i couldnt get a good smell off of it, i was smoking out my window, but the taste really sits in your mouth nicely.

im feeling a bit of a body high, kind of a warm feeling, really relaxed

It's all confirmation bias.

And Denny knows, because...

I tried it, of course.  When I first heard the idea 20 years ago, I thought it was ridiculous.  The only way to find out was to try it.  I found smoking hops to be a harsh, unpleasant experience.  My experience was nothing like the OP's.

Maybe you were smoking Fuggles!  :)

11
Any chance the next model will have Bluetooth connectivity with the Picobrew Z, so it can bring the yeast to peak vitality just as the brew is ready?

We haven't figured out how to get the yeast to sign the privacy agreements yet...

Are the yeast holding out for a bigger cut of the profits?

12
Beer Recipes / Re: Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone
« on: March 27, 2018, 07:54:27 PM »
There is a dead ringer found right HERE in this famous thread.
The extract version is within the first few pages.

FWIW, I would always dryhop this beer with some cascade for increased aroma; the privilege of the homebrewer.  Cheers.

This is the recipe you'll want to brew.  I've made it several times and it is, like Pinnah said, "a dead ringer."

Striving to find the best version, any copies of this recipe in your collection?

I don't think you can get any better "clone" than this:
https://sierranevada.com/beer/year-round/pale-ale


13
Homebrew Con 2018 / Re: Homebrewcon 2018 -Who is Going?
« on: March 09, 2018, 02:04:30 PM »
Flying in Wednesday afternoon and flying out Sunday morning.

I hope we can have a meet-up like we did in Baltimore (last HBC I went to).

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« on: March 04, 2018, 01:54:42 PM »

We need someone to step forward and take up this call for justice.


After such an impassioned plea and rational argument, I propose Jim take up this challenge.  ;)

15
Zymurgy / Re: Zymurgy Best Beers Survey (and free swag)
« on: March 03, 2018, 01:21:18 PM »

3.   The Best Beers survey helps us generate the clone (tribute?) recipes that AHA members want.


Hey Gary---The only question I have is what 2-3 IPAs recipes will they be this year? It seems that since IPAs dominate the list, there is very little style variation as to what recipes are printed. I am sure that something other than an IPA has been done the past few years but it seems that some different style other than IPA could possibly be chosen from the top 10 or 15 beers.

Just my opinion.


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