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Messages - jmwrightmegg

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: March 01, 2014, 12:22:55 PM »
And maybe it goes without saying, but make sure you;re using the best quality hops you can find.  Dry hopping is not the place to try to use up your old hops.
OK, so that begs another question:  via mail, where do you all recommend I get my hops?  I usually use Morebeer.

Where abouts are you from if you don't mind me asking?

CA Sierra Foothills, near Sacramento.  I am not really close to any metropolitan area, so I prefer to use mail order for ingredients.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: March 01, 2014, 12:15:05 PM »
And maybe it goes without saying, but make sure you;re using the best quality hops you can find.  Dry hopping is not the place to try to use up your old hops.
OK, so that begs another question:  via mail, where do you all recommend I get my hops?  I usually use Morebeer.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: March 01, 2014, 11:43:03 AM »
OK, so in reading all of your responses, it looks like to take my IPA's to the next level, I need to use at least one pound of hops per 5 gal. batch, utilize a hop stand of at least 1 oz. per gallon, make sure to rack to secondary before dry hopping, and maybe dry hop more than once.  That gives me a good direction, thanks everyone.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: March 01, 2014, 08:26:56 AM »
Most pro brewers use whirlpool additions for a good portion of their late hops. This really amps up the flavor and aroma contributions of the hops, and the bitterness seems to be a lot smoother (similar to First Wort Hopping to my palate).

As a homebrewer, if you don't have a whirlpool you can still approximate this by using a hop stand (adding your flameout hops, then letting them steep hot for 30-90 minutes). IME, that's the only way to come close to (or even exceed) that saturated hop flavor you find in commercial IPA's.

That, and use a whole lot of hops. I'm using just over a pound of hops in a 3-gallon batch of IPA right now, and I might push that even further the next time I brew my "house" IPA recipe.

I didn't know about doing a hop stand.  However, doesn't that negate some of the desired effects of late hop additions, them being the aroma hops that are usually added during the last 1-5 minutes of the boil?  Wouldn't leaving those "aroma" hops in the almost boiling wort for 45 minutes essentially "boil away" the aroma oils?  Or, are those aroma contributions dwarfed by the massive dry hopping you are doing anyway?

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: February 28, 2014, 09:51:12 PM »
Email knee deep and ask if they will share the recipe. I've met the brewer a few times at various events in Sac and he always seemed cool.

I was just having this conversation with another pro brewer, and he said he had the Simtra last year at a beer festival and asked Knee Deep's brewer about the recipe, and they wouldn't share.   However, the question I have applies to PTY, Firestone Double Jack, Sculpin, and many more DIPA's, not just Simtra.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Duplicating the best DIPA's at home
« on: February 28, 2014, 08:48:27 PM »
There are so many great IPA's available now, I am in heaven.  Although I have made some very good IPA's at home over the years, some of the DIPA's out there are blowing me away.  I'm not really sure how the pros are getting their smooth, clean, enveloping hop aromas and flavors.  I know dry hopping and using some of the new breeds of hops like Simcoe and Citra must account for some of the high quality, but I feel that maybe there is some technique or trick that I don't know.  For instance, for those in the distribution area of Knee Deep out of the California Sierra Foothills/Sacramento area, if you have tasted this amazing "Triple IPA" that I see many are comparing to PTY, I am curious about just how they achieve the insane levels of hop utilization. I have homebrewed and dry hopped many times, and I have used Citra and Simcoe, but I can’t get anywhere near that smooth, beautiful hop aroma and flavor. Does anyone know what tricks the pros are using these days for some of the top DIPA’s?

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Commercial Beer Reviews / How old is too old to buy an IPA?
« on: June 20, 2013, 07:39:07 PM »
I am a retailer/restaurateur. Also a home brewer and beer freak. Anyway, I just received a case of an unnamed canned West Coast IPA from a well-known San Francisco Bay Area brewery. It came through an unknowledgeable distributor. The case said "canned on 3/1/13. Today is 6/20. I have always tried to get my IPA's delivered by 90 days from bottling at the maximum. How do you guys feel about this? If you saw a date of 110 days past bottling on a West Coast IPA, known for typical citrusy fresh hops and dry hopping, would you hesitate before buying it? Does my 90 day rule make sense?

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Using sweet cherries
« on: October 08, 2012, 06:14:09 PM »
I would certainly reserve some for a pie! 

Jamil said in one of the podcasts (I think on Baltic Porter) that cherries are one of the harder fruits to work with.  You either have the problem of driving off too many volatiles by adding during the late stages of primary fermentation, or if you add them too late, they can sometimes just taste funny.  What many say works best with fruit is too add them after primary fermentation has completed, and to SUPPLEMENT with the same fruit extract at bottling/kegging, or slightly before.  If I were you, I would do the following:

Select a style -- I believe that american wheats and porters are several styles that work better than others with cherries.  I'm not sure if its sour or sweet (or if it matters).  Add 6 lbs of them to your batch of whatever you make after primary fermentation.  If you can puree them after thawing, do that to add surface area and pulverize the skins (sanitize your blender/food processor, though the alcohol in the beer at that point will be helpful in staving off bugs/bacteria from taking hold/multiplying).  Wait another few weeks (order some cherry extract in the meantime), let them ferment out and taste it. 

This is the best part:  draw about 8 ounces of the beer, and separate into 4 glasses.  Dose each one with increasing amounts of the extract and taste each one, clearing your palette in between (it helps to have some additional palettes/pieholes around).  Then scale it up to the amount of beer remaining prior to kegging/bottling. 

Then, once its carbed, send me a six pack.

I'm just concerned that I am wasting my expensive cherries.  I don't know if there is much character extracted from them.  Maybe adding fresh cherries is just a really expensive way of adding sugar to a recipe.  Would I get approximately the same result just using extract?

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General Homebrew Discussion / Using sweet cherries
« on: October 08, 2012, 05:31:20 PM »
OK, I know cherries are the subject of many threads, but I haven't seen a good answer to this question:
"I have a lot of sweet bing cherries in my freezer and want to make a cherry beer without waiting the requisite year for a lambic or other long-production style.  What can I do with them (12 pounds)?  Is it a waste of beautiful sweet cherries to try to make a quicker beer?  Should I just make cherry pie?"

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Beer Recipes / Re: Humulus Lager clone
« on: January 24, 2012, 04:24:07 PM »
I think the style may be on the verge of becoming more widely-brewed. Definitely worth more thought and recipe formulation from the homebrew community.

Very interesting.  I have been thinking about a beer for the last few months.... an "American Helles" hopped westcoast IPA style. ::)

I did not know it was already a "style", although I think the name IPL is a bit odd.  Should have known, it definitely
is the time of excessive hops.

Please let us know how that turns out.  I agree that "IPL" is weird.  It is classified as an "Imperial Pilsner" on Ratebeer, but of course that isn't really correct since the hop profile is wrong for a Pilsner.  Maybe "Lagered Imperial Pale (LIP) would work. 

As a first experiment, I made 6 gallons of Pliny this weekend and split it for an ale/lager yeast comparison.

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Beer Recipes / Re: Humulus Lager clone
« on: January 23, 2012, 08:20:45 PM »
Good ideas.  I'm pretty convinced that once more people try this it will be a big hit, and possibly pointed to as the originator of the IPL (India Pale Lager) style.  Very refreshing to get all the West Coast hop flavor and aroma that you could want with the bracing bitterness of a good pilsner and a very light malt presence.  I guess it has a really small distribution right now.  The brewer says they are trying to work it into their year-round line-up, but tank space is at a premium. 

How old is this beer?

A local place had an IPL on tap when they opened a little over a year ago. They are primarily a lager brewery.  They use WLP-833 for many of their beers, and the Mexican Lager too.

 I think it was first released in 2011.  Never saw it before.

Well if it was first released in 2011, I can tell you that they were not the first to make an IPL.  Many breweries have done one before, generally as a seasonal.  Even here in Nebraska one of the local brew pubs did an IPL way back in the fall of 2010 with locally grown hops. 

You may be correct. H. Lager is still a great beer, and I think the style may be on the verge of becoming more widely-brewed. Definitely worth more thought and recipe formulation from the homebrew community.

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Beer Recipes / Re: Humulus Lager clone
« on: January 23, 2012, 06:36:36 PM »
Good ideas.  I'm pretty convinced that once more people try this it will be a big hit, and possibly pointed to as the originator of the IPL (India Pale Lager) style.  Very refreshing to get all the West Coast hop flavor and aroma that you could want with the bracing bitterness of a good pilsner and a very light malt presence.  I guess it has a really small distribution right now.  The brewer says they are trying to work it into their year-round line-up, but tank space is at a premium. 

How old is this beer?

A local place had an IPL on tap when they opened a little over a year ago. They are primarily a lager brewery.  They use WLP-833 for many of their beers, and the Mexican Lager too.

 I think it was first released in 2011.  Never saw it before.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Measuring mash pH
« on: January 23, 2012, 11:49:48 AM »
So what chemicals do you guys have at hand to adjust the water?  Or does a "pH stabilizer" like this from Morebeer work just as well?

http://morebeer.com/view_product/19873/102199/52_ph_Stabilizer_-_1_lb

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Measuring mash pH
« on: January 22, 2012, 05:17:18 PM »
Thanks for the info and references.  I will analyze my water to see what beer styles I will be most successful at where I live.  I'm a little depressed, because I really didn't want to add the complication of treating water to the brewing process. 

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Measuring mash pH
« on: January 22, 2012, 03:03:54 PM »
Denny,

Can you please recommend a resource relating to what pH is best with what beer styles?

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