Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - walteratmarchpump

Pages: [1] 2
1
Thanks for the reply.
For now I've elected to pickle the bronze pump head using a mixture of vinegar and hydrogen peroxide. I found instructions on this process on John Palmer's how to brew website. It was like high school chemistry all over again! I'm much less concerned about any lead making it's way into my brew than before.

The stainless heads are sold out all over the web but I eventually plan that as an upgrade anyway.

Thanks again

No problem...let everyone know how the pickling works out for you incase anyone else is thinking about going brass as well :)

2
Walter, I dropped my 809 off the utility table, It makes a humming sound but that is all. I thought I would ask before taking it to a pump repairman. Any ideas what I could do to fix it?

First thing i would do is remove the pump head off the motor bracket (4 philips screws) and run the motor alone. If it works then the motor bracket shifted slightly and what you need to do is install the pump back on. Plumb it up with water...then just barely loosen the 4 flat head screws holding the bracket tot he motor and tap it around the base till you get the bracket re-aligned again and not rubbing....you'll know when you are close when it starts pumpng again...it will most likely have a metal rubbing sound to it as the drive magnet rubs against the stainless rear cover plate...just make small taps till its quiet again and tighten it all up.
If the motor wont go at all then all i can say is send it back to me here and i can try and hammer it back out for you....i have a good streek in fixing these guys as of late! :D

3
During my upgrade to the 815 impeller, I noticed that the teflon washer was long gone.  Unfortunately, I only ordered 1 new teflon washer with the impeller. 

That 809 HS pump is over 10 years old with about 100 batches.  I'm sure the washer was probably gone a while ago, but no ill-effects were noted.  How important is that washer and how long (run-time hours) do those washers last?

The cost of the washers is next to nothing, so the only real cost is the shipping.  Wish I had ordered a couple of spares.

The washers will normally last the life of the pump as long as theres nothing attacking them chmically...or unless you have restriction on the inlet side of the pump sucking the impeller up against it...The newer washers are all white...the older ones were black and sometimes hard to see if they were still there or not....it may be the washer was there but didnt look like it! :D

4
So, I'm building my system up and was wondering which March pump would work best for a 10 gallon system?  I will be adding a plate chiller as well, probably 40 plate.  Any advice would be great!

Thanks,
Jason

Sorry guys, i wasnt getting notifications for some reason...anyway getting back on track:
 Most guys are now ordering the 815-PL....or upgrading their 809-HS pumps with the 815 impeller.
The thing i'm not sure about, is how much pressure or restriction that chiller plate would put ont he pump. Once thats figured out then i could size the pump easily.

5
Walter, I use an MDXT-3 pump that I bought 10 years ago from McMaster-Carr.  The manual shows the maximum liquid temperature to be 190ºF, however, I regularly pump 200+ water through it.  Other than the occassional air lock, what other negative effects should I expect to crop up?

That pump is rated for 190*F....and many people do use it for brewing because they use it for short runs at those hot temps. The concern we have with running it above the 190*F  temps, would be more for the long term applications. You may see a softening of the plastic if you were to immedietly take the pump apart and inspect it. And as  long as theres no pressure going throught he pump you will probably never have any issues with it. The polypro we use, shows temps ok to 220*F but the issue we have is that with the design of the pump, the back end of the impeller/housing runs hotter due to low fluid turn over during operation. If you take the pump apart occasionaly, just inspect the rear housing for any deformation and same with the imeller...if all looks good then no worry's :)

6
I am in the process of upgrading my system and implementing a pump. I currently plan to use it only for recirculating wort back into the kettle while my immersion chiller is chilling the wort. I have a rather tall brewstand and use gravity for taking the hot liquor to the mashtun and running off wort from the mashtun to the kettle.

I see there are polysulfone headed pumps and brass/bronze headed.
I've also been made aware the polysulfone are prone to wear and have fragile threads.
I don't want metallic taste in my beer from the brass. Is this an issue?

Please help me decide which way to go. Pros and cons of both types?
I tend not to want any brass in contact with my wort if I can help it but frankly I've not been able to detect any detracting flavors when using brass ball valves or brass barb fittings on my cooler mashtun or elsewhere in the system to this point.

TIA

Wurf



People have had issues with the plastic head pumps with breaking off the threads.....but we find its more that they are over tightening the fittings when installing them on the pump. We usually recommend 1-2 wraps of Teflon tape....then hand tighten the fitting on but don’t try and crank it down as much as possible by hand.....then when you get it hand tight, give it another 1/4-1/2 turn with a wrench and that should be more then enough. The threads are tapered so the more you tighten it, the more stress you put on the connection as it gets tighter.
As for Brass or plastic....I cant really give you an answer on which is better or not. I can just give you information and you have to make a decision for yourself.
If you go with the brass, the advantages would be the strength most of all....they can take  more pressure internally and obviously have stronger threads for fitting connections. But the biggest thing that i just want to make you aware of is that the brass contains up to 6% lead content. Keep in mind that’s the very same thing you have in your home fixtures unless you live in CA where they mandated 0% content few years back. The only difference is that no one drinks the hot water coming out of your home faucet, and the temp really never see above 135* out of you faucet either. So as to what affect that will have on anything i really don’t know.  If you wanted a metal pump head, you could go with a stainless version we have. But i know for most people its too expensive and there is a competitor that sells them for way cheaper then us. I have seen them sell a complete pump head for almost as much as we buy just the raw castings for!! And we still need to spend some time machining the parts to our tolerances before final assembly!  We strive to try and keep as much as possible made in the US before going elsewhere for parts. Those stainless pump heads are coming out of a foundry in PA. The competition is China...that's why they can sell them for so cheap. If you happen to have an existing 809-HS pump then you could go and buy their stainless pump head and swap it out and have stainless that way....just an option to throw out there for you guys.. :)

7
Priming is always an issue with these types of pumps. Can you offer any suggestions as to system plumbing modifications, head position, etc, that would help.  Thanks.

A good start would be to look over the tutorial i posted a few threads down or just go here: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=11157.0

Once you understand the mounting issues of the pump head the next thing to check out would be the plumbing itself. Try and keep the hoses or pipes as short as possible and try not to have any high spots between the pump and the supply tank its drawing from. If you happen to trap some air in the line before you start the pump, even though it may be primed in the begining, it will suck that air pocket in and cavitate and give you problems. Most times people that have problems on start-up will shut the pump down and start again and most times that was enough to purge all the air out of the system. That usually tells me the pump head is positioned wrong. Another issue with priming the pump is when you have a full rolling boil.....in that case you are sucking air being generated from the boiling right off the bottom of the pot. In those cases just kill the flame and let the brew settle down for like 30seconds before starting up the pump so its not generating bubbles anymore.

8
Walter,

Thanks for this great info.  I just ordered a new impeller last week as I was having trouble pushing wort through my heat exchanger and back into my mash tun, and a little trouble with priming and air leakage.  I am hopeful that this upgrade along with a few hoseclamps will solve it.  However, if not, are there other pumps availible (or on the drawing board) between your 815 and the nano pump (325?) at $350?

I'm so sorry that i overlooked your posting...to answer your question the pump in-between those two you mention would be our AC-3B-MD. That pump will give you an output of 10gpm and can pump up to 20' of head height. Its made out of the same material as the 809 and can handle the same temps..... :)

9

How do we go about ordering parts for March pumps?

We dont sell direct so the only way to get parts would be through a distributor. You can find a list of them on our website under the distributors tab. We have them listed by state so find the ones near you and give a few of them calls to see who can get you the best price. 
www.marchpump.com

10
Pictures and everything. This is really, really great info, and I definitely have mine mounted like #6 in the photo. Will change that this weekend for sure.

Walter, do you guys have housings you sell for multiple pumps? Or perhaps have any diagrams on how to build one? My two 809HS are 'loose' at the moment (took them inside for the winter and cleaned them etc) and I'd like a better/more portable solution than the bucket they're currently in.

I'm not quite sure i follow what you are saying... Do you mean if the pumps have different heads you fit on the motor brackets?? Then the answer is no...each bracket is designed to hold that pump. So all the 809 pumps are interchangeable but you wont be able to fit lets say one of the MDX pump heads on it or visa-versa.
And not quite sure what you mean by "Loose" if you mean its just there and not mounted down to anything then do a search on the internet. I dont knwo if anyone has posted it here before but i have seen other places where people have taken the 809 pump assembly and mounted it inside a plastic tool box with just teh pump head sticking out. Then they have a switch mounted on the top lid and when you open the lid up you have storgae for power cord and any fittings etc...

11
The pump on the right side with the plumbing attached in the pic.....take the 4 phillips screws out and rotate the pump head 180* so the inlet is at the bottom like the one on the left.....you are trapping air in the top portion of the pump head and cavitating it. Check out the posting i made about pump head orientation and look at pic#4 it will show you how you get air trapped in the top of the pump head with it mounted like that. Other then that it looks good......only other thing i can suggest is if you happen to be trying to pump the liquid at boiling temps then you may be drawing air in off the bottom of the kettle as the bubble form and you could cavitate the pump that way too.....just cut the flame and wait like 30seconds for it to calm down and then crank the pump up.

12
I have a 809 HS pump.  What does the high flow impeller do for the performance of that pump?  I seem to recall the shut-off head of that HS model is on the order of 12 feet.  Is there a pump curve for that impellor?  What is different about the impeller and when should a brewer consider its use?

Thanks!

If you have the 809-HS inline version then right now it will do 6gpm and a max of 12.1 feet.
upgrading to the 815 inpeller will increase the max gpm to 7 and raise the head to 18 feet
it also helps a bit more in keeping the prime and passing bubbles easier due to  the impeller being larger and taking up more space. The standard inpeller has a dia. of 1.687" and the 815 is 2.156 and has a stronger magnet.

13
Thanks for joining us Walter!

Also want to thank Denny for asking Walter to join us here.

Anyway...I have a question regarding my March pumps. I have a Brutus 10 clone single tier brewstand. I use two pumps that are mounted below the kettles, and from time to time I have a problem priming the pumps. What are your thoughts in this regard. Any ideas, suggestions or input would be very much appreciated.

Thanks!

If you can post a pic for me to look at it would help with suggestions...or email to me if you like

14
Walter - Thanks for the detailed response. It's great to have you here to answer questions.

Do you think the AC-5 could handle something like that better? I was looking at the drawings, and it looks like the impeller is a different shape (4 blades instead of 6) so maybe that could handle bigger chunks?

I'll try the experiment you suggested next time I brew.

The AC-5 will handle more/bigger "stuff" but again if you get that big clump of junk going through the pump then it too will get chocked up and stall on you. the only pumps that would be able to pass debis along would be a shaft drive centrifical...butt hen you have the shaft seal to worry about. Theres also a gear drive pump but again you have a shaft seal and then the gears will crush the debris and make it smaller/finer. And you could also use a peristaltic pump but they dont realy move a great deal of liquid around...i'm sure you could make a DIY peristaltic to move a good amoutn of liquid of you used like a 3/4-1" line butt hen you would need a decent size motor to do it with.  :)

15
I wonder if I could use my 809 to pump a mash, like in a decoction? I'm afraid to try it because I don't think it will work.

It will depend on how much is going through the pump at any given point during the pumping. The pumps actually can pass solids up to about 1/4" in size....problem is if they happen to pass through just right and jam between the impeller and the pump housing then it will stop the impeller and decouple the mag drive. The the motor will freewheel and you would get any pumping action out of it. I know the mash is a soft solid and in small quantities it will pass through the pump...if it clumps up or you get a bigger pocket of mash going through you will have problems....all i can suggest you try is possibly after a brew session when you are done with the mash.....dump it into a kettle of water and try pumping it through the pump and see how it goes. You will probably find you need to keep stirring it so its evenly suspended in the liquid as its getting pumped out. At least this way if it does clog your not ruining a good brew. :)


Pages: [1] 2