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Messages - tommymorris

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: January 13, 2019, 02:37:50 AM »
"Old Hollybush"  Strong Mild Ale

This was, after Bitter,  the 2nd style I ever tried to brew way back when.   But I didn't know it then.   In the 80s, when colored-up, watered-down,  mid-century Mild was nearly extinct,  beers like this (really just pre-1917 style Mild it turns out) were readily available, often parti-gyled with the weak stuff (though I didn't know it.)  Confusingly,  it was always called "Old Ale," even though "old" is literally the opposite of "mild," and these beers were never aged; apparently it just meant "old fashioned," which it was.  I enjoyed the "Old Ale" style and tried to emulate it,  but not understanding it, I never really succeeded.   Now with a better grasp of the history and relationships within the Mild family,  and lots of Ron Pattinson's work to draw on, I think I can get where I was going.   Today's version:

12.6° P

Ca 104 Mg 10 Na 41 SO4 227 Cl 52

78% Chevallier pale 4.9% Amber  4.9% C77 12.2% No. 2 Invert

37 IBU (calculated in wort) 67% Cluster and Willamette FWH 33% Golding 15 minutes

Color adjusted to 14°SRM with cold-steeped black malt

S-04

(My original name for my version of the style comes from a pub,  the Holly Bush in Hampstead, where I enjoyed "Old Ale" and Modern Jazz.   I still fancy the ale, the jazz not so much.)
Sounds good.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: Manometer
« on: January 11, 2019, 11:38:01 PM »
Why does my wife’s manometer read zero around me?

3
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Alternative to Picnic Tap?
« on: January 11, 2019, 11:36:38 PM »




Okay, I've got a keezer and don't need this setup.  BUT I WANT THAT SHINY TAP HANDLE!  Tommy, source please!
I’ve successfully lobbied the Alabama and Mississippi legislatures to ban use of these in home taprooms other than mine. But, for you...

https://www.chicompany.net/beer-store/beer-dispensing-equipment/tap-handles/chrome-tap-handle

PS. Don’t drop it on your foot.  It’s heavy.

4
Kegging and Bottling / Alternative to Picnic Tap?
« on: January 11, 2019, 11:00:13 PM »
I do the same as BrewBama. This thread has a picture: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=25689.0

I think you can do the same with Intertap for less now.

Since creating the thread above I moved to stainless quick disconnects. They have the advantage of being stainless and of  a 90* connection to the tap. This turns the Perlick to face straight down. See below and compare to the pic in the link above which has the Perlick  spout at an angle.



Stainless QD: https://www.morebeer.com/products/torpedo-ball-lock-disconnect-beverage-stainless-flare.html

Be aware this only works with flow control faucets. You will serve foam with a regular faucet. Lots of stores sell a QD faucet combo that is not flow control. Those are for parties. You have to turn down the pressure when using the non flow control set up. That is okay for one day but you don’t want to have reduced pressure in your home kegerator. You will loose carbonation over time (I think. I have never actually tried reduced pressure over a long term).

5
All Grain Brewing / Ale yeast for a lager
« on: January 07, 2019, 12:18:19 PM »
I like wlp001 for faux lagers.  Very clean and crisp. Keep it as cool as you can 60-62F is great. It doesn’t taste exactly like a lager but it is very close.  I personally think it’s better than Kolsch yeast because Kolsch yeast tastes like Kolsch ;)

PS. Do not try this with US-05. It is NOT the same as wlp001. US-05 imparts a very noticeable peach ester in light lager grain bills.

PS. lager to me is Helles/Dort. If your making something with dark Malts or lots of hops, the Kolsch flavor may be masked by those flavors. 

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: January 06, 2019, 09:15:01 PM »


More Bitter...

93% Pale Ale Malt
7% Caramel 40
36 IBU Brewers Gold FWH
0.75 oz/3G at 1 minute
0.75 oz/3G at steep/whirlpool
S-04 yeast

It accidentally dropped to 55F. Not sure exactly how. I think a switch on the controller was half open/closed. I notice it was starting to ferment anyway. I am raising to the mid 60’s now.

I figured there would be a half ounce of chocolate in there somewhere.

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Ha! Yeah this looks strangely familiar...  and mighty good.  My kind of beer.   S-04 is my new go-to,  nice to know how low it will go!

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I haven’t tried S-04 in years. I bought it because you and BrewBama like it.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: January 06, 2019, 09:13:15 PM »
More Bitter...

93% Pale Ale Malt
7% Caramel 40
36 IBU Brewers Gold FWH
0.75 oz/3G at 1 minute
0.75 oz/3G at steep/whirlpool
S-04 yeast

It accidentally dropped to 55F. Not sure exactly how. I think a switch on the controller was half open/closed. I notice it was starting to ferment anyway. I am raising to the mid 60’s now.

I figured there would be a half ounce of chocolate in there somewhere.

LOL

You should haul your GF down to Rocket Republic Sat to do the Homebrew Competition. First time I’ve heard of a brew it, ferment it, package it, condition it on-the-premises brew competition.


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I am leaving the chocolate out for now. I am enjoyed the last one sans chocolate so I thought I would do that again.

I wanted to do the brew off but I had already signed up for a trail run race in Monte Sano. I don’t want to miss that. I may drop by after the race.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: January 06, 2019, 06:51:57 PM »
More Bitter...

93% Pale Ale Malt
7% Caramel 40
36 IBU Brewers Gold FWH
0.75 oz/3G at 1 minute
0.75 oz/3G at steep/whirlpool
S-04 yeast

It accidentally dropped to 55F. Not sure exactly how. I think a switch on the controller was half open/closed. I notice it was starting to ferment anyway. I am raising to the mid 60’s now.

9
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: January 02, 2019, 01:24:26 AM »
  It seems Golding (and Brewers Gold) is hard to come by right now.  And it looks like Ted's listings are all 2016 and 2017 crops. 

Found 2018 crop, whole cone, US Golding at Freshops (not necessarily my first choice, but the only source I found.)  Had the presence of mind to order some,  so, by the time I get over this flu, catch up on real life,  and have time to brew again,  I should have them.  I'll report the results.
I hope you like the US Goldings. If you don’t like them, you can blame your flu for convincing you to take my advice on using Goldings from the US. I hope you feel better.

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: December 30, 2018, 05:52:44 PM »
While I know the partygyle method was(is) certainly used, coupled with the hop schedule from the BYO recipe which seems to somewhat emulate the Brewery Log, 92/7/.2 ~ ish doesn’t seem so bad an all malt ESB recipe to me.



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I agree. That grain bill seems to validate a lot of advice on this forum.  My last Bitter was just Pale Ale and Caramel malt, but, I have added a bit of chocolate in the past on the advice of S. Cerevisiae (Mark). But, when I did that I was more like 0.5-1% chocolate. I specifically dropped it on this last batch because I wanted to eliminate the nutty taste. So, the 0.2% chocolate is interesting to me.  I wonder how much taste that imparts. It might be a subtle taste that is positive or it may just be color. If it’s just color, I don’t care to bother.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: December 30, 2018, 03:00:03 PM »
I have in fact come down with something, but, lying awake coughing and aching, I've had some thoughts.   I would not take a "recipe" extrapolated from that log at face value,  and here's why.

In a standard parti gyle (literally "split batch,") a single wort, of a higher gravity than the strongest beer to be made, is mashed, sparged, boiled, chilled, and divided into multiple fermenters.  Before pitching, each fermenter is diluted with water to the desired OG, thus producing versions of the same beer, with same balance,  at different gravities.

Fuller's process represents a complication.   Two different worts, of different gravities and different compositions, are taken from mash-in to chill separately,  then blended in different proportions into the fermenters before the final dilution.  The worts are of different compositions, or there would be no point to the elaboration:

One might expect all of the roast and crystal malts, for instance, to go only into the second mash tun for the weaker wort.  Hence on blending, beers could be produced that, though of different gravities, have a similar color,  and weaker beers could have a palate fullness and richness naturally present in the stronger beer with less need for crystal, and so on.  I would also expect the weaker wort to receive a disproportionate amount of the hops.  Thereby weaker beers can drink drier and more refreshing,  and stronger beers, being relatively sweeter,  will not be deceptively and dangerously drinkable.  (This last is counterintuitive to Americans who have come to expect stronger beers to be hoppier, but it has always been the English preference.)

So we may know the weights of various malts and hops that ultimately produced the stated volumes of each beer at each gravity.   But we do not know how these ingredients were apportioned.  (Maybe why Fullers are so willing to share images of their books:  they're not really giving away the secrets.)  It might be possible to reverse engineer each "blend" from available information,  but I am not up to it.
They have a column on the sheet for No. 1 Tun and No. 2 Tun with ingredient amounts listed for each. The amounts for each tun are nearly identical although not exactly the same.

12
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: December 30, 2018, 04:04:26 AM »
Could it be this additive?

BYF No.3: BYF No3  is used asa dry acid for reduction of alkalinity in brewing liquor.

https://murphyandson.co.uk/store/liquor-treatments/453-byf-no3-25-kg.html

13
Beer Recipes / Latest ESB recipe
« on: December 30, 2018, 02:05:14 AM »
If you can decipher a brewers log here is the ESB/London Pride/Chiswick Bitter partigyle recipe direct from Haley Marlor a brewer at Fullers.

PS. Anyone know an alternative to photobucket that doesn't put a hideous watermark on photos?



That’s an interesting sheet. It looks like the grain bill is

92.6% Simpsons (I wonder which malt?)
7.2% Crystal Light
0.2% Chocolate

The sheet lists 260 HL ESB @ 55.8, 520 HL LP (London Pride) @ 40.8, 260 HL CB (Chiswick Bitter) @ 34.5. I assume 55.8, 40.8, and 34.5 are the gravity points, which makes sense for those 3 beers.
I'd take a flyer that the "Simpsons" is Best Pale, not a varietal.  But what do I know.   If the crystal light is Simpsons too, that puts it at 40L.  (I prefer Crisp 45L in that range, but that's me.)  Pieces coming together .

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Found this pic on the Fullers site.  All the malt looks to be Simpsons, but can't read the labels on the pallets of Pale.  :(

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From the Simpson’s blog post linked below:
“Best Pale Ale Malt is the soul of our beer, and we get the best Brewhouse extract from Simpsons Malt.” – Georgina Young, Head Brewer, Fullers

https://www.simpsonsmalt.co.uk/blog/malt-of-the-month-best-pale-ale-malt/

14
Beer Recipes / Latest ESB recipe
« on: December 29, 2018, 11:34:04 PM »
I have an English Pale on tap right now that is delicious. I broke all the rules.

1051 OG
85.4% Briess Pale Ale Malt
6.7% Briess Caramel 60
7.8% Golden Promise (leftovers)
36 IBU Brewers Gold @ FWH
0.75 oz/3G US Goldings @ 1
0.75 oz/3G US Goldings @ 20 minute steep
MJ M36 Liberty Bell yeast

This beer turned out great. It has a nice caramel flavor along with an orange marmalade ester flavor that I love. The hops are great and give it a nice English character.

A bit off topic, but, Ted Hausotter wrote this in the description of the hops “Golding hops are the classic English hop.  These are grown in Oregon's Willamette valley and are beautiful.  They are used in ESB, Porter, Stout, Belgian, Blonds, US Ale, in fact they work in all ale styles.  My favorite for ESB!.  They are the same root stock as East Kent Goldings, just grown locally.”  So, I decided to try them. I didn’t have any English Malts on hand so I just went with Briess. Great hops and great beer.
Continuing a bit off topic,  the complication is this.  Golding is not a variety.   It has been, since the 1700s, a catchall term denoting the most desirable hops from certain growing areas, mostly around Kent.  Over the years, dozens if not hundreds of genetically distinct hops, which don't even share similar appearance or growing habits, have been sold under the name.   This isn't a knock, it's just what you get in traditional agricultural products,  much the same happened with Saaz and other old hops.  Right now at least half a dozen varieties are marketed as Golding, and East Kent is the preferred subset. The grower knows it by its varietal name, but the brewer only buys it as EKG, sort of like a DOC seal I suppose.  What this suggests to me is that of much greater importance than the  variety,  is the terroir of East Kent (again, happens in Žateč and elsewhere.)  So I've long been skeptical of North American grown Goldings.  You don't know which variety they planted, and that may not matter.  So getting to the point at hand.   Tommy, if Ted's hops worked for you, and really have the English Golding character, that's great news.   Are they pellet or whole cone?   If they're whole cone,  I have to get some!  (You sound like you captured a very elusive quality.   When asked what English beer tastes like, my standard response is "Orange marmalade on buttered sourdough toast.")
I am just a hack. I brew what tastes good to me. I think my beers are close to style, but, that is never my primary goal.

I get the orange marmalade every time I use the Mangrove Jack’s M36 Liberty Bell yeast. I love that yeast.

Regarding the Hop Heaven US Goldings hops: they taste English to me, but, YMMV.

15
Beer Recipes / Re: Latest ESB recipe
« on: December 29, 2018, 11:29:16 PM »
If you can decipher a brewers log here is the ESB/London Pride/Chiswick Bitter partigyle recipe direct from Haley Marlor a brewer at Fullers.

PS. Anyone know an alternative to photobucket that doesn't put a hideous watermark on photos?



That’s an interesting sheet. It looks like the grain bill is

92.6% Simpsons (I wonder which malt?)
7.2% Crystal Light
0.2% Chocolate

The sheet lists 260 HL ESB @ 55.8, 520 HL LP (London Pride) @ 40.8, 260 HL CB (Chiswick Bitter) @ 34.5. I assume 55.8, 40.8, and 34.5 are the gravity points, which makes sense for those 3 beers.

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