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Messages - jeffy

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Wort vs water boil off rate?
« on: February 14, 2019, 06:10:19 PM »
I have read all of the posts regarding boil off rate and keep wondering how much af an effect it has on the overall beer.  My method is not so much calculated, but more experiential.  I almost always employ a 60 minute boil and I usually make 10 gallon batches, so for a typical 1.050 cooled wort, I use 15 gallons of water.  I will use more water to make up for bigger grain bills (water absorbed by grain), but I can’t see if there is any other benefit to the amount of boil off other than to dial in your system.

Without getting into the weeds, there really isn't any reason to boil the snot out of the wort. I think most would agree with that. People have been becoming aware of things like boil stress on the wort for a little while now. It has long been considered best practice for commercial brewers and it seems to be catching on at the homebrew level as well.

People report good results when decreasing the boil vigor, including better finished malt and hop flavors, etc.
I have always boiled at what I would call a high simmer, nothing violent, but some occasional rolling activity.  It matches the videos I think I have seen Martin reference.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Wort vs water boil off rate?
« on: February 14, 2019, 05:01:01 PM »
I have read all of the posts regarding boil off rate and keep wondering how much af an effect it has on the overall beer.  My method is not so much calculated, but more experiential.  I almost always employ a 60 minute boil and I usually make 10 gallon batches, so for a typical 1.050 cooled wort, I use 15 gallons of water.  I will use more water to make up for bigger grain bills (water absorbed by grain), but I can’t see if there is any other benefit to the amount of boil off other than to dial in your system.

3
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Kegerator Life
« on: February 10, 2019, 01:18:43 AM »
The fact that it was making the beer freeze tells me that the main components, compressor and evaporator are working.  It could be something simple, like dirty cooling condensor coils.  It may be worth it to have it serviced.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: SRM
« on: February 09, 2019, 08:22:52 PM »
I vaguely remember going to a seminar at NHC on this subject by a speaker from Briess.  As I recall it was at least ten minutes of excellent information crammed into an hour session.

5
Beer Recipes / Re: Error in Sierra Nevada Resilience IPA recipe
« on: February 09, 2019, 03:38:23 PM »

It also says “recipe scaled to BYO recipe standards”. Whatever that means.


BYO explains their recipe standards on the 3rd or 4th page in every issue.  They standardize all the recipes they publish to help control variences.   If you use thier recipies a lot, it might help you know what to expect.

Paul
I have an article coming up in the next issue and had to write up two recipes by their standards.  It's mostly a standard efficiency, 65%, and having both metric and U.S. measurements.  Tedious, but not difficult.

Will look for it. What is the topic?
Brewing with peppers.  I just hope I don't embarrass myself on the national stage.

6
I agree with Narcout - hit all of those categories.  The BDSA may be the weakest fit to style but who knows?Certainly that botanical (bugleweed) pushes it into the SHV category and why not try experimental, also?  Give the judges a good explanation, so they hear what you were trying for and make sure that the intended or referenced ingredient is perceptible.  The best SHV beers I have judged retain the basebeer character and are simply nuanced by the unique or respective additions.  It would be wild for the same beer to sweep all three!

 Cheers and Welcome to the forum!

Hitting all three categories will probably not be possible at NHC considering how expensive it is, if you only registered for 1 entry or if you got four but then use 3 of your 4 on one beer?

I would suggest spice herb veg, especially with the herb being pronounced.  Have you considered American Strong Ale for a base? The Rye and willamette hops would push it in that direction unless the yeast character is very plainly Belgian.

This was an excellent idea!!!  I planned to do it, and had one of those “life comes at you fast” days on the last day to add entries and missed the deadline. C’est la vie.

I really appreciate the input. It’s will definitely help me to make a more educated rifle-shot, since I’m working with one entry.

I’m not necessarily going for a win, but rather some good feedback on my submission.

Thanks again / Cheers



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I agree it would probably fit best in the SHV (spice, herb, vegetable) category.  By tasting the beer and reading the BJCP style guidelines while tasting it, you should be able to determine the best fit for the base beer although American Strong Ale might be a good possibility here.  Remember, if you would enter it inn this category, you will have to provide extra information on what's in it to the judges so that they can evaluate it properly.

Also since this is your first competition, I would enter a smaller competition to get appropriate written feedback.  As has been mentioned, the NHC uses a checkbox format rather than written comments.  The written comments give you a lot more feedback on the beer and you can use them to tweak your recipe for the next NHC competition.
I also agree with the above.  NHC over the years has been geared more toward winners than toward feedback, with the score sheets giving less of the latter in both rounds of the competition.  If you are looking for feedback, another competition may be a better idea.

7
Beer Recipes / Re: Error in Sierra Nevada Resilience IPA recipe
« on: February 09, 2019, 03:02:11 PM »

It also says “recipe scaled to BYO recipe standards”. Whatever that means.


BYO explains their recipe standards on the 3rd or 4th page in every issue.  They standardize all the recipes they publish to help control variences.   If you use thier recipies a lot, it might help you know what to expect.

Paul
I have an article coming up in the next issue and had to write up two recipes by their standards.  It's mostly a standard efficiency, 65%, and having both metric and U.S. measurements.  Tedious, but not difficult.

8
Equipment and Software / Re: jacketed conical fermenters for homebrewers
« on: February 08, 2019, 08:25:12 PM »
Hi Denny,
Are those Rennerian coordinates in your signature line?

Thanks for the conical info!  And yes, those are Rennerian coordinates!

Denny,
Thanks for the reply. Those coordinates take me back to a simpler time in this hobby of ours.
I got 'em as well!

9
Equipment and Software / Re: Adding a whilpool port
« on: February 06, 2019, 11:41:13 PM »
I added a whirlpool port to my kettle a little higher than half-way up the liquid level.  I think it depends more on the strength of your pump than the location of the port.  I use mine with an external chiller which cuts down on the flow a bit so I use my paddle to give the boiled wort a really good stir before I start chilling.  This helps with the true pile.

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Leaking Post
« on: February 05, 2019, 10:14:07 PM »
"Sometimes I have to poke at the poppets to reseat them after disconnecting the quick disconnect."

But then more beer would shoot out, right?
A quick stab since it's already leaking, but yeah....

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: American Barleywine Recipe Critique
« on: February 05, 2019, 10:11:37 PM »
What is the purpose of this:
0.375 lb light DME @ 20 mins

12
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Leaking Post
« on: February 05, 2019, 03:41:20 PM »
It's probably not the post that is bent, but the part of the keg that the post screws onto.  It may make a difference as to where the dip tube goes at the bottom of the keg, but it probably isn't the cause of the leak.  The spring-loaded poppet in the post is most likely not seating properly or the o-ring may be damaged.  Sometimes I have to poke at the poppets to reseat them after disconnecting the quick disconnect.

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« on: February 05, 2019, 01:09:59 PM »
I am not so sure that a longer mash will extract tannins from dark or roast malts.  That has more to do with higher pH during sparge than the recipe's malt bill.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: February 04, 2019, 10:30:31 PM »
On Sunday I brewed a German Pils using low oxygen techniques.  I had a couple of glitches that were easy to work around.  I wetted the malt a bit too much for mill conditioning and it took forever to run through the mill, but it worked.  Pre-boiling the water works better if you don't have to change the propane tank right in the middle of the brew session.  Later I opened up two one-ounce packets of Sterling hops that I had purchased the day before only to find the pellets brown and odorless, so I had to find a good substitute in the freezer.
Anyway, it wasn't too bad and I made ten gallons of very pretty wort.
And I smoked a rack of ribs. :)

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Habanero Friendly Hops
« on: February 03, 2019, 03:55:52 PM »
Were you making a habanero beer what hop(s) would you use for a hoppy style of beer?

I used 100% Centennial in my strong ale and felt that I couldn’t discern either flavor, which wasn’t bad, but seemed to meld together into something I couldn’t recognize. I’m not sure if it’s a something to consider or not but I feel I’d almost prefer a hop that’s more habanero flavored. And though that’s a tall order as far as I know I’d still like to hear ideas of hops that would play nicely. Recommendations?
I would go with tropical fruit forward hops like Citra or something similar, maybe South American.  Stay away from strong, harsh bittering hops.

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