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Messages - zanderson

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The bubbling is still going on.  The temp on the side of the carboy is 70 or 71.  Foam has really settled down and puffed up a lot but not close to the airlock so no need to swap to a blow off tube.  Good smells are still coming out of the airlock.  Going to wrap another wet towel around it and let it stew and bubble. :)

Thanks,

-Zac

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Big Al, et al, brewed the kit today.  Ended up with an OG of 1.045 as far as I can tell from the read.  Pitched the yeast at 78 degrees after some vigorous shakes / rotations of the carboy.  This was done around 2:30PM today.  It's 11:11PM and I have the carboy down in my basement.  Just to test the temp down there I set a glass of water there overnight and took the temp this afternoon.  It was 68 degrees so I'm going to assume that is the ambient temp in the cellar/room.  I did pitch 2 vials of the WLP002.  When I cracked open each vial they were under tremendous pressure - they almost fizzed all over.  I was able to get 90% of both vials into the carboy.  I bunged up the carboy and tossed on the airlock.  I'm getting some activity as shown in the video below.  Is that airlock setup right from the looks of the video?  9 hours in and I'm getting this kind of activity - that's good right?  The beer tasted great from the OG reading tube sample. :)  Sweet and hoppy.

http://youtu.be/jLmVagZs-iI

Any questions, please ask. :)

Thanks,

-Zac




Sounds like you're on your way to great beer right from the start! Arguably the two most important factors in making great beer are the two that are most overlooked by new brewers and you're already taking care of the first one on your first brew. The second is fermentation temperature control. This is huge! Always know what temperature range works best for your yeast and try to keep the temperature in that range. You can find it here: http://www.whitelabs.com/beer/homebrew/listings
WLP001 likes 67-73f but many ferment it cooler to keep the flavor cleaner.
Keep in mind that the temperature of the fermenting beer will be several degrees warmer than ambient temperatures. You can keep it cool by placing your fermenter in a water bath and tossing in frozen bottles of water as needed. A wet T-shirt fitted over your fermentor with a fan blowing on it works well. Or simply placing it in a cool corner of the basement can work well. Happy brewing and welcome to the hobby.

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Thanks for the reply!  This is my first brew ever and I'm hoping it turns out well!  I will def. note the link you have above.  I will also post back how this turns out as I'm going to document everything I can.  ;D

-Zac
Elgin, IL

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I have seen, on more than one occasion, that some have pitched dual packets or vials of yeast in their 5GAL batches.

I'm going to be brewing up NB's 20min Pale Ale extract kit next week and it comes with (1) vial of WLP001.  I ordered a 2nd vial of WLP001 since I had heard/seen online that some have pitched two vials to get the yeast count up there.

Any reason why this would hurt or hinder something in my batch or is it okay to do but *might* be overkill?  Sure the cost of an extra vial would be a downfall but that wasn't a main concern.  Looking for pro's and con's of dual pitching of vials/packs.

Discuss.

Thanks!

-Zac
Elgin, IL

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Equipment and Software / Re: Tap Water Temp
« on: September 25, 2013, 09:35:40 PM »
I just wanted to add another note on this.  In the culinary world - they use blast chillers and ice wands to bring the temp of soups and stocks down below the temperature danger zone.  I bet if you sanitized one of these ice wands it would help chill down very quickly aided by a wort chiller.  (They are also knows as cooling paddles or rapid cooling paddles.  San Jamar is one manufacturer of them.)

-Zac
Elgin, IL

P.S. In culinary school we always used the ice wands in conjunction with an ice bath.

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Equipment and Software / Choosing The Right Brewpot
« on: September 25, 2013, 05:34:04 PM »
Hello brewers!  I'm looking to spend a few bucks and get a nice brewpot for brewing.  I will be doing 5GAL batches to start off with but want the option to go bigger 10GAL down the road without upgrading equipment.  If I were to get a 15GAL brewpot to do 5GAL batches to start with - any issue with that?  I don't see how there could be but I wanted to ask.

When doing 10GAL batches, will a 15GAL brewpot be large enough?  What is a good rule of thumb in selecting a brewpot for various sizes?

Thanks in advance for any and all advice.

Regards,

-Zac
Elgin, IL

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