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Messages - case thrower

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Grain prices at AB InBev
« on: May 14, 2018, 08:50:15 PM »


AB/InBev, by buying NB, is doing research.

I was wondering if they're analyzing data (which recipe kits are most popular, etc.) in an attempt to understand or predict consumer preferences for craft beer.

I'm willing to bet that is just one of the things they're looking at.  I think the first thing they're looking at is how to adapt their business plan to the homebrew market.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Grain prices at AB InBev
« on: May 14, 2018, 04:14:44 PM »
The big question is if walmart was all there was, would you shop there?


To answer this question, if walmart was the ONLY option, I'd have no choice.  But what happens when they are able to drive all their competition out of business and then they pull out of that market 'cuz it's not profitable enough?  And then the nearest grocery store is 25-30 miles away.  And the nearest hardware store, etc., etc.  And it has happened.  Walmart's business model is not to reduce their competition, but to eliminate it.

And I'm a home brewer.  I buy very little from any brewery, let alone anything from 'Big Beer'.   :D

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Grain prices at AB InBev
« on: May 14, 2018, 03:41:53 PM »
Me five and I live in Akron, Oh.  (Not as big as Tampa, LA, & Boston, but big enough.)

It was a joke.  :)



Nobody is laughing.  We see the problem.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Grain prices at AB InBev
« on: May 14, 2018, 03:06:51 AM »
AB/InBev, by buying NB, is doing research.  This area of brewing, OUR AREA, is a thorn in their side and what better way to get to know your enemy, which I am sure is how they characterize craft beer AND home brewing, than to buy into it.  The cost of craft breweries is for them small and to buy into the homebrewing market even smaller.  Sometimes we have to look past our own wallets to see the true costs we are facing.

And no, I will NOT shop at wal-mart.  Just because they are now America's largest employer does not mean they are a good employer. 

5
Ingredients / making invert sugar
« on: May 08, 2018, 11:36:56 AM »
In another thread, there was a post about a Ron Pattinson recipe (https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=31727.0) and that recipe used invert sugar.  I contacted Ron and he was kind enough to reply with these directions.

No. 1 invert is a specific type of sugar used in brewing. It's very different to table sugar.

This is how to make it youirself at home:

Making invert sugar

As brewers’ invert sugars aren’t easily available, making them yourself is probably the best option. It doesn’t take a huge amount of ingredients or equipment. You’ll need:

•   cane sugar (not table sugar)
•   citric acid
•   water
•   a candy thermometer
•   a saucepan

This is what you do:

•   For each pound (455 g) of sugar you use, bring 1 pint (473 ml) of water to the boil.
•   Switch off the heat and add the sugar slowly, dissolving it.
•   Add 1/4 teaspoon (1 g) of citric acid per pound of sugar.
•   Turn on the heat again (not too high) and set the alarm on the candy thermometer to 230ºF (110ºC).
•   Stir frequently while it starts to simmer.
•   When the temperature hits 230ºF (110, reset the alarm for 240ºF (115.6ºC).
•   Heat slowly (the slower the better) until the temperature gets to 240ºF (115.6ºC).
•   Lower the heat to keep at 240ºF–250ºF (115.6ºC –121.1ºC).
•   For No. 1 maintain at heat for 20–30 minutes.
•   For No. 2 maintain at heat for 90–120 minutes.
•   For No. 3 maintain at heat for 150–210 minutes.
•   For No. 4 maintain at heat for 240–300 minutes.

The colors you’re aiming for are:

•   No. 1, 12-16 SRM
•   No. 2, 30-35 SRM
•   No. 3, 60-70 SRM
•   No. 4, 275-325 SRM

Thank you, Ron!

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: One brew that is a must.
« on: May 04, 2018, 10:08:51 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Invert sugars, nos. 1-4, are invert syrups of varying colors (ranging from 16-325 SRM) used in British beers. Ron's book The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer gives directions for manufacturing these. It's not just sugar, and is also not the same as Belgian candi syrups (which add distinctive flavors as well as color.)

Thanks.  I'll check it out.
For this recipe I generally use Lyle's Golden Syrup for the invert. I don't know if it's the exact same as the light colored invert sugars, but that's generally what I use when a recipe calls for a light invert sugar.

I'll keep that in mind but I went on youtube and found a couple of videos on making invert sugar that gave me what should be enough knowledge.  Thanks, though.

7
Equipment and Software / Re: New toy
« on: May 02, 2018, 10:29:13 PM »
Looks pretty good.  Just out of curiosity, where'd you source it?  I've got a 3500W Advantco I use in the garage.  On the couple of occasions I noticed some moisture build up on the car windows, I just cracked the garage door open a touch.  There were several more brews where I didn't notice anything, though.  When it was 5F outside, it was a balmy 40F in the garage.  Ain't electricity nice?

And while I'm only doing 2.5 gallon batches, bringing just a little less than 4 gallons of wort to a boil with 3500W doesn't take very long at all!  I had tried an 1800W unit that just didn't have the guts to get the job done so when we moved, I had a 220 line put in the garage and it's worked out great!

I got it from Amazon. I looked at the Avantco which had a better price point but had poor reviews from what seems to be a recent bad batch. If you’ve had yours a while you probably have an earlier one which have been reportedly better. One guy has had his Avantco five years with only minor maintenance. ...but the later ones seem less resilient. I rolled the dice on this one because the reviews seemed better. (Pay once cry once mentality.) We’ll see if I live to regret the decision.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I got mine almost exactly a year ago.  I've got 25 batches on it and so far, it's worked like a champ.

8
Equipment and Software / Re: New toy
« on: May 02, 2018, 10:04:18 PM »
Looks pretty good.  Just out of curiosity, where'd you source it?  I've got a 3500W Advantco I use in the garage.  On the couple of occasions I noticed some moisture build up on the car windows, I just cracked the garage door open a touch.  There were several more brews where I didn't notice anything, though.  When it was 5F outside, it was a balmy 40F in the garage.  Ain't electricity nice?

And while I'm only doing 2.5 gallon batches, bringing just a little less than 4 gallons of wort to a boil with 3500W doesn't take very long at all!  I had tried an 1800W unit that just didn't have the guts to get the job done so when we moved, I had a 220 line put in the garage and it's worked out great!

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: One brew that is a must.
« on: May 02, 2018, 08:39:56 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Invert sugars, nos. 1-4, are invert syrups of varying colors (ranging from 16-325 SRM) used in British beers. Ron's book The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer gives directions for manufacturing these. It's not just sugar, and is also not the same as Belgian candi syrups (which add distinctive flavors as well as color.)

Thanks.  I'll check it out.

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: One brew that is a must.
« on: May 02, 2018, 07:57:05 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Australian Sparkling
« on: April 13, 2018, 05:03:39 PM »
Check out the Craft Beer & Brewing website.  Josh Weikert did an article a couple of months ago on this style.

12
The Pub / Re: Giving Back a Rescue Dog
« on: February 10, 2018, 11:42:52 PM »
My sympathies.  I know it hurts.

13
The Pub / Re: Giving Back a Rescue Dog
« on: February 10, 2018, 12:13:49 AM »
Don't give up hope.  There are some great rescue dogs out there just waiting for you.  To type this, I had to move Samson out of my lap.  He's an 8 10 12# Yorkie mix who's my best bud.  We've also had some who had their issues.  When my son was still in high school, we got a 6 month old Dalmation mix from the local humane society.  The mother and the pups had been abused and while she wasn't a bad dog, she did have issues.  Every time my son walked into the house, she would growl and slink into the other room.  After he'd been there 10-15 minutes, she'd be ok, but I guess he must have resembled someone from her past.  And she did that until she got leukemia and we had to put her down 14 years later.  The sad thing about these dogs is that you have no idea what they've been through and they can't tell you.  Right now we also have a chihuahua mix we've had for 3 months now.  Bend down to put a leash on and she cowers, but she's getting better.  And it just seems like all she wants is to be your friend.  Like I say, they're out there.  Good luck!

14
Ingredients / Re: Maris Otter
« on: January 29, 2018, 10:27:13 PM »
I was impressed.  Nice and open, fairly well organized.  They seemed to have most of what you'll need.  I wasn't checking prices since there's only so much space in my tiny little head.  And I just realized I needed Campdon tablets and I forgot all about them.  I really like G&G but it's nice to have options, too!

15
Ingredients / Re: Maris Otter
« on: January 29, 2018, 09:30:17 PM »
Don't forget Thomas Fawcett, they've been my go-to for a while. To me, Crisp has been the most disappointing, their Maris Otter comes off as muddy, likely a result of their blending. Their specialty malts weren't anything to write home about either.

It's possible I didn't have great examples, but again, Fawcett has never disappointed me. Supposedly their Maris Otter wasn't blended back when Crisp was doing so. (Don't know the current state of protein in MO, so i don't know if Crisp is still blending.)

Thomas Fawcett isn't available locally and I'm not going to pay the shipping for grains.  Otherwise, I've love to try that brand.  As it is, I went to Vine n Hop today and picked up a bag of Simpson's Maris Otter.  On top of that, they give a 10% discount on grains, hops, and dry yeast to AHA members.

You were peeking, weren't you?  Yeah, local is Grape & Granary.  Not so local is Label Peelers and now I've got to try Vine n Hop.
Yep, G&G is local, I've still never checked out Label Peelers.   Vine n Hop is nice, their prices are a little steep next to G&G, but they have a pretty wide selection of malts.  If I want something different I often go there and the price washes out when I save shipping!

I visited Label Peelers a couple years ago lured by the low prices on hops. I was surprised when we walked back into the shipping area and there were 6 or 7 pallets stacked with boxes of hops. The bulk (volume) explained the low prices but what surprised me was that they were not refrigerated. Just sitting in the 60-65 degree warehouse. I don't mean to bash them because walk in coolers are not cheap to install or run, just want to inform anyone who expects their ingredients to be stored in the best conditions possible prior to use.

 

Probably just me being a jerk, but I've had some issues with Label Peelers so they are just about at the bottom of my options.  For any equipment, if I can't get it at G&G, I'll search the net.  I have gotten hops from Yakama Valley but for grains and yeast I stick to what's locally available.  This is why I was so glad to see another option for the Maris Otter.

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