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Messages - alemental

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1
Equipment and Software / Re: Sure Screen
« on: March 05, 2012, 11:19:48 AM »
Whole hops work just fine with the surescreen. That is my standard technique for dry hopping. No problem whatsoever. Don't try hop pellets: those will plug it up.
Loose hop cones have a real tendency to float though, so lay your keg on it's side to get more of them in constant contact with the beer. Then flip it end for end frequently to redistribute them a bit more evenly.

2
All Things Food / Re: Bread Pre-ferments
« on: November 22, 2010, 03:55:54 PM »
I've always called it a poolish. And IMO the approach lends itself to making great bread.



If it's 100% hydration - that is, the water weight equals the flour weight - it is indeed a poolish. If it is significantly drier, it is called a biga. And you are exactly right; preferments ARE just what can make an ordinary bread into great bread. One with depth of flavor.

3
All Things Food / Re: Bread Pre-ferments
« on: November 22, 2010, 11:03:29 AM »
Yep, you got it.
It is just like a big preferment. Note how little yeast is required for the no knead breads; that's why it can ferment for 18 hours without ruining the dough. All that time lets the enzymes take care of business and develop that refined flavor. The yeast or sourdough then has plenty of time to grow into what is essentially a large enough pitch, so to speak.
That it is also about the easiest way to make bread is a bonus.

4
All Things Food / Re: Chili
« on: November 21, 2010, 04:18:44 AM »
I've always poured the beer into me, then ate the chili. Perhaps I should adjust my techniques.
I've been meaning to make chili for a while now, and I have a stout on tap. Sounds like it's time to try adding some, and see what develops.

5
All Things Food / Re: Bread Pre-ferments
« on: November 21, 2010, 04:10:42 AM »
Dumb question time - What's a pre-ferment?

Not a dumb question at all. A preferment is taking some of the flour from a batch of dough, usually a lot of the water, and just a little of the yeast or sourdough culture and letting it start fermenting well before the rest of the ingredients are added to finish fermenting the dough. This breaks down some of the complex carbohydrates into  simpler ones, including sugars, that make for better flavor. Just adding sugar to the dough without prefermentation will not give you the same results.

6
All Things Food / Re: Bread Pre-ferments
« on: November 21, 2010, 04:03:13 AM »
Well, that makes a bit of sense I guess, but it's still starch right?  I can't imagine that the 110F water I'm adding is allowing for enzymatic conversion of that malt flour to sugars.   


Unless you are keeping your dough at a high temperature, the enzymes will survive & continue to break down the complex carbohydrates into simpler ones, which leads eventually to sugars. The Professor is correct about the added malt in flour, but you can take wheat berries & grind them into flour, and it will still benefit from a preferment.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Ask the Experts
« on: October 18, 2010, 09:34:55 AM »
I think a really good choice would be Kristin England to discuss brewing Berliner Weisse. Not much info is out there on this style, let alone techniques like culturing lactobacillus for it.
In fact, he could discuss all the nearly forgotten styles he touches on in Stan Hieronymous' recent wheat book. The Berliner Weisse is probably the one that will raise the most interest though.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Ask the Experts
« on: October 15, 2010, 05:10:30 PM »

Great effort Denny!

I'd like to see Jamil Z...can we talk about recipe development?

He's a popular guy in our wide world of brewing and I think he will generate alot of interest.

I'll 2nd this...recipe formulation & development is a big, big topic, difficult to explain. And who would be better than Mr.Beer Style himself?

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Your Homebrew Name
« on: August 16, 2010, 10:01:48 AM »
"Isles of Langerhans Brewery"

Isles of Langerhans are the part of the pancreas that produces insulin. Mine have been stone dead for many years, so this name is my little joke with myself.
I deserve it for having a hobby that I shouldn't.


One of my favorite comedy groups, Firesign Theater, used to talk about "the far flung Isles of Langerhans"....



Ha!
I used to listen to them all the time, even before my Isles crapped out.  Good memories. Thanks for that Denny

Now I think I'm gonna change the name to
 The Far Flung Isles of Langerhans Brewery

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Your Homebrew Name
« on: August 15, 2010, 11:53:18 AM »
"Isles of Langerhans Brewery"

Isles of Langerhans are the part of the pancreas that produces insulin. Mine have been stone dead for many years, so this name is my little joke with myself.
I deserve it for having a hobby that I shouldn't.

11
All Things Food / Re: The Homebrewed Chef with Sean Paxton
« on: August 12, 2010, 03:14:01 PM »
Food and beer. My 2 favorite topics.

And the man knows them both.

12
All Things Food / Re: brats
« on: August 12, 2010, 03:11:16 PM »
OK, that's all I can take. I just ran to the meat market & picked up some brats. The dough (sorta half way between ciabatta and French bread) for some buns is in a slow ferment right now.
Gonna be a-cookin tomorrow.

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Starting the mash COLD ?
« on: August 12, 2010, 10:06:02 AM »
Edit: OK on the way up, the grain will trap heat and cause a BURP. I have maybe half a shot glass on the stove. No biggie.

That burp means that you are reaching boiling temperature at the bottom. You need to stir more aggressively. And constantly, as long as you are applying direct heat

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Boil Off Rate
« on: August 10, 2010, 10:08:30 AM »
Either use a lower boil off factor in your calculations, or boil longer before adding your hops. If you have already tossed in the early hop additions, keep boiling, but hold off on the later additions. Your beer will be slightly more bitter, but the flavor and aroma profile should come out as planned this way.

15
Try attaching a stainless steel scrubbie over the end of your racking tube. Use a stainless hose clamp or even a cable tie. This will stop a lot of hop matter. Like anything that can strain hops, though, it can clog with enough hop bits. It is a very good idea to whirlpool first, just as beerocd recommends above to get the bulk of it away from your tube.

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