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Messages - mosinnagant

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I think for the price, and what is included, this kit is probably the best place to start: http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/1-gallon-small-batch-starter-kit-1.html

If the included beer turns out ok, I'll add-on as money allows.  This is probably as big as I'll ever need, but a good cheap place to start learning.  Hopefully good for cider making too.

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......But if you like DIY stuff then you will probably enjoy the brewing process regardless of what kind of beverage you make, so long as you enjoy what you make.

I do believe this is what brought me here :)  I'm always trying to find a way to DYI, as it means more than just buying or replacing something, when you have some of yourself in it.  Plus, knowledge is almost always helpful, and you can't get that as much when purchased.  I guess that's why they don't sell degrees, you have to earn them.

As for the other types of beers that have been suggested, I've never tried those.  I think that's what I'm going to have to do first, is try a commercial version, to see what kind of homebrew I want to make.  Thanks for the advice, I'll definitely be checking those out! :)

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Plastic bucket vs water jug
« on: October 15, 2013, 02:17:52 PM »
Learn something new every day.  Can't learn if you don't ask right? :)  Thanks for the heads up everybody, will definitely not be using anything like what is shown then.  Will probably stick to the bucket idea, since it's known to work just fine.

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Yeast and Fermentation / Plastic bucket vs water jug
« on: October 15, 2013, 08:48:50 AM »
I've looked up fermenters, and most are pretty expensive.  I see that most people use food grade plastic buckets.  Just out of curiosity, is there a reason these are better than something like this?



I have no idea, so that's why I'm asking.  I'm sure there's a reason for the way things are done.  I know the price of that particular jug above is much more expensive than a bucket, but is that the only factor?

I also know that it likely won't have as good of a seal than a plastic bucket, but I'm sure a rubber seal could easily be fabricated to seal the lid to the bottle.  If you can put a hole for an airlock in the plastic bucket, to release gasses, seems like you could with this too.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Oklahoma law changes
« on: October 14, 2013, 03:34:35 PM »
Hello all, if this is in the wrong place, feel free to move it for me if you can, as I didn't see any other place to put this.  I was reading through the Oklahoma Statutes on this site, and I saw it mentioned about how homebrewers can only brew up to 3.2% alcohol content.  I know that is currently the same law for beers sold in grocery stores and in some bars I believe.  I heard that law is about to change next month, and will be closer to Texas' 6 point laws.  I wonder if this will affect homebrewers here....

As a very small commercial brewery, we pay a higher state tax if our beer is over 7%ABV.  Just trust me when I say I never brew label a beer above 7%.

 ;D

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Other Fermentables / Re: Possible noob question about making yeast
« on: October 14, 2013, 01:23:05 PM »
"Here is a synopsis of the brewing process:

Malted barley is soaked in hot water to release the malt sugars.
The malt sugar solution is boiled with Hops for seasoning.
The solution is cooled and yeast is added to begin fermentation.
The yeast ferments the sugars, releasing CO2 and ethyl alcohol.
When the main fermentation is complete, the beer is bottled with a little bit of added sugar to provide the carbonation."

That section of that link you provided explained more to me about the process than most of what I've read in other places.  A lot of things I've read had step by steps, but didn't explain why, so it was confusing as to why you were doing what.  Thanks again, back to reading :D

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Other Fermentables / Re: Possible noob question about making yeast
« on: October 14, 2013, 01:20:00 PM »
If you want a good intro, try the online version of "The Complete joy of Homebrewing" http://www.howtobrew.com/ .  The online version is free.

Paul

Ooops, mixed titles!  The link is for How to Brew by John Palmer.  But I don't know how much good it wll do for someone who's mainly interested in cider.

From what I read on the Oklahoma Statutes, I'll need to have a permit before I can start making anything anyway, so might as well educate myself as much as possible.  I do like beer as well, so I'm sure I'll make some for myself ;)  Thanks!

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General Homebrew Discussion / Oklahoma law changes
« on: October 14, 2013, 12:58:07 PM »
Hello all, if this is in the wrong place, feel free to move it for me if you can, as I didn't see any other place to put this.  I was reading through the Oklahoma Statutes on this site, and I saw it mentioned about how homebrewers can only brew up to 3.2% alcohol content.  I know that is currently the same law for beers sold in grocery stores and in some bars I believe.  I heard that law is about to change next month, and will be closer to Texas' 6 point laws.  I wonder if this will affect homebrewers here....

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Other Fermentables / Re: Possible noob question about making yeast
« on: October 14, 2013, 11:01:05 AM »
You would be using a wild culture and there is no guarantee what you would end up with.  I ' m not saying you shouldn't try it but I would caution to start out with a small batch.  That way if get earthy, pine tar, with ragweed flavor you won't feel so bad about throwing it out.   ;D  You have no way to know if what you will get started is a yeast or a bacteria and the flavors from wild strains of either can be absolutely great or horribly, horribly bad.

And, not to be an language freak but..., you don't make yeast.  Yeast make themselves.  We culture/grow yeast but we don't make it.  Some other higher process or power made it unless you are geneticist in which case maybe you can.   8)

That's why I asked, cause I've never tried it :)  I'm still researching home brewing, don't even have anything to get started, just wanting to learn as much as I can first. 

As for the language, I'm from the south, we call all soda Coke.  "Hey, you want a Coke?"  "Sure!"  "What kind you want?"  "Dr Pepper!" :D

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Other Fermentables / Possible noob question about growing yeast
« on: October 14, 2013, 10:44:54 AM »
When making a fruit based cider, would there be any benefit to making growing some yeast from the fruit you'll be using in the cider?  I have no idea if local fruit, water, yeast, etc, would have any benefit at all in the brewing process :)

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Ciders, Fruit Ciders, Perry's and Fruit Beers are all styles of some interest here on the AHA forum. You can find some discussion on this here: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?board=31.0

Welcome to the AHA Forum!

Thanks for the link Bluesman.  I was reading the thread about the "The Everything Hard Cider Book", and it sounded like it was right up my alley, so I went ahead and purchased it.  Sounds like if there won't be anything local here in OKC I can get into to get my hands dirty, this might be a good place to start too.

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Other Fermentables / Re: The Everything Hard Cider Book
« on: October 14, 2013, 10:00:03 AM »
Just purchased, will definitely read before I try to make anything :)

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Thanks for all the comments.  It sounds like there are many different ways to get started, just pick what  way works for you.  That's pretty cool.  Definitely something I'm interested in.

VinS - I'll definitely check into that, it's right around the corner, and might be the best way for me to get some ideas on how to get started, thanks!

While I appreciate the shout out, I'm not certain my approach is applicable to a brand new brewer.

To the OP....I'm not familiar with any of the beverages you mention.  If you could describe them a bit more, maybe we could figure out what you're after and how to help you.

The drinks all call themselves different things, though mainly hard cider or apple ale.  The Leinenkugel (sp?) has a definitely beer flavor, with a slight fruit aftertaste.  Another I forgot is Shocktop, which has an apple drink as well.  It's not as heavy on the beer flavor as the Leinenkugel, but obviously present. The others are all very similar, with more fruit than anything when it comes to flavor.  My fiancee just doesn't like the taste of beer itself, not sure if it's the malt or hops or what.  But the apple ales or cidars have almost none of that taste.  That's what we're looking to make.  Since almost all of them are apple based, I thought it might be fun to branch out, try some other stuff.  Mango makes a good mixed drink, why not a mango ale? :)  Tons of fruits out there, and I'm curious lol

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For as long as I've been legal to do so, I've always been a Budweiser drinker.  A lot of heavier beers aren't really for me, too bitter for my taste.  My fiancee can't drink beer at all.  So we've recently ventured into fruity ales.  I know this isn't serious brewing, making a dark flavorful lager or anything.  But I've tried Leinenkugels, Angry Orchard, Reds, etc, and really like the fruit flavors you can get, and it's something I can share with my fiancee.  Is brewing something like this similar to beer brewing?  I like to DIY whenever possible, as I love to learn new things, and perhaps find a new hobby.  Definitely not doing it to save money, but not wanting to spend big bucks, as we're really not heavy drinkers, just occasionally, and it would be nice to have a few bottles of my own brew in the fridge ready for us when we want :)  Anybody else here like this, or is everybody brewing up huge amounts?  I guess I'm just looking for a good place a newbie can go to learn about the process of home brewing.

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