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Messages - hmbrewing

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Secondary Fermentation... or not?
« on: February 07, 2015, 07:21:43 AM »

"By the way, the 3-month test that hmbrewing ran proves not only that autolysis is overblown, but also that oxidation when racking to a secondary fermentation vessel is overblown.  The old school autolysis bogeyman has been replaced with the new school oxidation bogeyman."

I did not think of it that way! 2 VERY good points!

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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Secondary Fermentation... or not?
« on: February 07, 2015, 04:03:00 AM »
I'm late to this thread, but I don't secondary anymore and haven't in years. I did an experiment with our homebrew club  a while back. Brewed 10G of summer ale and split the batch into 2 carboys. I let one sit for 3 months - on the trub and yeast and the other I racked over into a secondary after 3 weeks and let it sit the same amount as the first batch. I bottled both on the same day (boy did that suck).

The result? No one - not one single person in our club could pick out which batch sat for 3 months in primary and which one was put into a secondary. They couldn't even tell the difference by judging clarity as they were both spot on. I'll repeat that - there was NO visible difference in clarity between both batches. Some dropped secondary's from that point forward and haven't looked back, remain very pleased with the results of their beers, and continue to thank me for my experiment. Others are convinced my test was an anomaly and continue to secondary   :)

Hey - that's the wonderful thing about this craft - you make it yours and you own it. The beer you brew, ferment, condition, and care for is truly YOURS. Do what YOU think makes you the best beer and follow the process YOU enjoy the most! Cheers!

3
Equipment and Software / Re: Ghetto Mash Tun
« on: February 07, 2015, 03:39:08 AM »
I think I follow you...are you then going to push the stopper/tube setup into the spigot hole? Would the only thing holding the stopper in be pressure?

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 04, 2015, 11:53:50 AM »
Wait....what were we talking about? Why am I here?

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All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 04, 2015, 10:34:44 AM »
To those of you who don't know, I could literally walk 50 feet right at this very moment, and snap a picturesque photo of Lake Michigan and the Point Beach Nuclear Plant, where I work as an engineer.  However security might frown upon this behavior.  And I'll also say that it's really nothing very special to look at.  We don't have the awesome cooling towers.

Are you a former Navy "Nuke?"

Woah! What the heck happened to this thread? It took a turn for sure!  :o

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: cold steeping
« on: February 03, 2015, 11:01:25 AM »
Well, porter, it's actually an Everett "porter" clone with about 6.5% roasted barley. Still no cold steeping then? How about adding at the end of the boil?

Um, start by asking yourself what you;re trying to accomplish.  What's the reason for cold steeping or adding late?

+1. It all starts with what your intentions are. I prefer adding them at the end of the mash during the vaurlof. I've also cold steeped. BUT, I like my stouts/porters a little smoother and with less roasted bitterness. If you are looking for that full roast flavor/character, then yeah...you'll probably want to add them in the beginning.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 01:44:24 PM »
After experimenting with different mash lengths, I now do 90 for almost everything.  I simply prefer the results.

Hi Denny! What type of characteristics are you seeing from a 90 minute mash? Or - simply - what are the benefits that you see in your beers? I ask because prior to having this conversation about a 15 minute mash, I was actually thinking of going to 90. I've been averaging 75. Thanks!

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All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:53:37 AM »
Perhaps I need to re-run all my experiments conducted 8-9 years ago.  I guess I'll very cautiously give your friend the benefit of the doubt..... especially since I'm the same guy who's been saying for 8-9 years that you only need to mash for 40 minutes.

Apologies.  Cheers.

No worries...I was actually stunned when he was talking to me about it. Still am - hence the reason I posted. Just wondering if there was anyone out there who has heard about this or tried it recently. I know this is a topic that goes back a ways - but seems like things are changing so fast in the homebrew world that many techniques we thought were necessary may not be anymore?? We'll have to see what happens with my next batch. If I don't get great attenuation he'll have some explaining to do  :)

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:42:37 AM »
He's not a commercial brewer - he's a homebrewer...sorry, looking back I realize I mislead when I said "local brewer". He's doing 5 - 10 gallon batches and his beers are fully attenuating. And he's batch sparging. He's actually well respected and has helped many of us fine tune our brew days while also simplifying. So far, he hasn't lead me astray.

Like I said - I'll be testing this out. I'll report my findings but it's going to be a while.

10
All Grain Brewing / Re: The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 11:09:07 AM »
I knew I was going to miss a detail in the conversation: I asked him about attenuation and whether or not it would be affected. His response was none at all. We used to worry about this 5 or so years ago, but apparently this too has become a thing of the past. Malts have come a long way in just 5 years. He's getting his beers down in the 1.01 range with no issues. And he's also someone who batch sparges. So the wort is literally sitting in the mash for no longer than 15 minutes. Sorry...I'm sure I missed some other details...he threw a lot at me  :)

11
All Grain Brewing / The End of the 60 minute mash???
« on: February 02, 2015, 10:59:02 AM »
Hi! Just recently had an in depth discussion with a local brewer who also has a degree in micro biology yada yada some other degree too. Anyway...very smart. He's doing research and experimentation for a local malt company and said that 60 minute mashes will become a distant memory (if not on their way already). Apparently, the malts that are now available to us are now so well modified that you can achieve full conversion in 15 minutes or less. This includes Briess malts, who I understand will be completely discontinuing 6 row malt as 2 Row has become so much more efficient/well modified. With his last few batches he only mashed for 15 minutes at most and achieved full conversion and great efficiency! The only word of caution he gave to me was to be sure I did an iodine test prior to draining to confirm full conversion, which I always do anyway. So yes - on my next batch, I will surely be testing this. And if I achieve full conversion and it doesn't nick my efficiency I will most likely never look back as I'm not one to get stuck in a routine just for the hell of it. I love trying out new theories and ideas! Anyone else out there hear about this?

12
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Prime Dose Review
« on: January 13, 2015, 05:05:43 AM »
Just thought I would post a follow up to my original post....opened up the last test bottle, and its been a solid 2+ months since bottled, and the gel capsule is still in there. Oh well... I'll chalk it up to being a bad batch based on some of the positive feedback I'm seeing.

13
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Do you strain your wort?
« on: January 10, 2015, 06:44:46 AM »
I don't strain....use a hop spider and whatever makes it in after that is just fine. Some will actually argue that the trub ADDS to the hop character. Who knows how true that is.

14
Equipment and Software / Re: Another Fermentation Chamber
« on: January 08, 2015, 09:07:56 AM »
I used to own two Sanyo 9.5 cu. ft. refrigerators before I took an extended hiatus from the hobby.  I used one of the refrigerators as my beer/brewing refrigerator, and the other, which I acquired from a previous employer for a song, as a temperature-controlled fermentation chamber because I brewed mainly lager beer at the time. I sold the modified temperature-controlled refrigerator and kept the non-modified refrigerator as a basement soda/overflow refrigerator.

I periodically think about acquiring or building another fermentation chamber.  I have ruled out chest freezers.  Almost every temperature-controlled freezer I have seen that has been in use for a more a couple of years as a fermentation chamber has had internal rust from condensation build up.  With a refrigerator, condensation forms in the freezer section where it drains and evaporates.  I also do not want to have to lift full carboys out of a fermentation chamber (I have gone back to using glass). 

With that said, where does condensation form in a SOFC-style fermentation chamber?  I am assuming that it forms as sweat on the frozen jugs of water.  Has anyone experienced condensation problems on the fermentation vessel side of the chamber?

If you look at the picture "cooling chamber open" you'll see the frozen coffee can sitting on a towel. The condensation collects on the towel - not enough to end up with it soaking wet - but enough that I don't want it collecting on the floor. I don't get any condensation at all in the actual chamber the fermenter is in. Yet anyway.

By the way - that's a fantastic point about freezer units - I never even considered that!

15
The Pub / Re: What's your favorite thing about being a Homebrewer?
« on: January 08, 2015, 08:34:55 AM »
This is a tough one!

But definitely the DIY aspect of homebrewing - from formulating your own recipes to making your own equipment. Currently in the process of setting up a my own mini yeast lab and enjoying every minute of it! Can't wait to give it a run!

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