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Messages - majorvices

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1
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: July 25, 2016, 06:33:21 PM »
I only use whole beans from a local roaster and have a top of the line burr grinder. I'm probably a bigger coffee snob than I am beer snob.

Same here. I hope single origin coffee, relatively lightly roasted, and you use filtered water?

Yes and yes and yes. The guy that roasts my coffee hands roasts every batch. He is a true craftsman. Excellent coffee.

I have have heard both good and bad about storing coffee in freezer. Now, most recently, there is some science that says that grinding frozen coffee makes the best coffee because of the mire uniform way in which the beans are crushed.

2
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: July 25, 2016, 07:49:13 AM »
Who has a great recommendation on Espresso machines? I owned a cheap Delongi for several years that made a decent shot. Looking maybe at this one on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Breville-BES870XL-Barista-Express-Espresso/dp/B00CH9QWOU/ref=sr_1_6?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1469285740&sr=1-6&keywords=espresso+machine

We have this one.  No complaints, makes great espresso.

Awesome! I'm pretty excited about receiving the unit.

3
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: July 25, 2016, 07:48:40 AM »
We had a krupps a long time ago and it made great espresso until it crapped out.    We’ve had a rancilio silvia and have been making espresso on it everyday for a few years now.  I have been very happy with it, but it can be finicky.  Grind, freshness of beans, amount of pressure tamping. It can take a while to get the hang of making great espresso every time and you definitely need a good burr grinder. The most important thing is the coffee.  If you use crappy coffee expect crappy espresso.

I only use whole beans from a local roaster and have a top of the line burr grinder. I'm probably a bigger coffee snob than I am beer snob.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewing as you age
« on: July 24, 2016, 06:25:38 AM »
The answer is to open a brewery and hire young 20 year old studs to do all the hard work for you! :)

5
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: July 23, 2016, 12:52:12 PM »
would get the model without the burr grinder. you probably already have a good grinder. why pay for another one?

You are right, I do already have a top of the line burr gringer. I bought this one anyway because, well, what the hell. :0

6
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: July 23, 2016, 12:51:03 PM »
I like coffeegeek for reviews: http://coffeegeek.com/reviews/consumer/brevillebes860xl

In the old days, during my espresso serial obsession, the rule was to first buy the best grinder you can afford and then buy for an espresso machine. I used to have  a Rancilio Silvia with an external pid . Then my coffee obsession went out of hand, and now I hand-pour filter coffee. With the right quality of coffee (the best and freshest light roasted you can find), better than 90% of espresso coffee.

Thanks. Your coffee set up is exactly what I use and I agree it makes superior coffee. But it doesn't make espresso. ;)

7
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: July 23, 2016, 08:35:57 AM »
Yeah I don't want a cheap steam powered one. The good ones use a pump. The Delongi I had was a 15 bar pump driven espresso machine. Looks like they are still available and under a $100.

From the reviews of all the espresso machines I have seen on line it seems like you can only rent them, not own them, since they wear out after a couple of years.

8
The Pub / Espresso machines
« on: July 23, 2016, 08:04:07 AM »
Who has a great recommendation on Espresso machines? I owned a cheap Delongi for several years that made a decent shot. Looking maybe at this one on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Breville-BES870XL-Barista-Express-Espresso/dp/B00CH9QWOU/ref=sr_1_6?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1469285740&sr=1-6&keywords=espresso+machine

9
The Pub / Re: New Massachusetts Brewery
« on: July 23, 2016, 07:40:49 AM »
Cool! Congratulations, sounds like a sweet place.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Oktoberfest Ale
« on: July 12, 2016, 05:36:13 AM »
If you can ferment WY1007 at 60 degrees (72 hours is all you really need to keep the temp that low, the first 3 days of active fermentation) and then keep it cold (below 45 degrees) you will hardly be able to distinguish that yeast from a lager. I do agree that 2124/830/34-70 @ 60F. can work well, many commercial breweries that brew lagers use that lager strain as their "ale" strain at that temp. But nothing beats WY1007 as a lager like beer.

11
I just brewed a gose and I kettle soured the batch. I brought the temp just up to 190 to kill off most critters, held it there for an hour and then lowered the temp to 80. Pitched a lactobacillus culture and waited till the pH hit 3.8 and then boiled, added hops and salt and corriander. It's not completely done fermenting yet but it's close and it tastes pretty awesome.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Aerarting still hot wort
« on: July 11, 2016, 09:01:46 AM »
My search of HSA only resulted in stuff I already know about health savings accounts, please give me a clue what HSA stands for and maybe I'll make more headway.
  Thanks;
  V

BTW: If you type in "HSA Brewing" it pops up right away. Just sayin'. ;)

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Aerarting still hot wort
« on: July 09, 2016, 07:46:28 AM »
Do a search on "HSA" and decide for yourself whether or not you believe in the problems created by hot side aeration. Personally I try to avoid HSA but don't overly stress about it either. I recommend trying to minimize aeration of the wort when it is hot and I think it's best not to aerate until the wort is under 80 degrees.

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lacto and whirlpool hops
« on: July 08, 2016, 04:24:15 AM »
Seems to me that the antimicrobial properties of hops are still going to be released at whirlpool but I'm no expert on that subject, for sure.

15
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Pale Ale Fermentation
« on: July 08, 2016, 04:22:29 AM »
The first 72 hours is the most crucial period to keep the beer cool. After the first 72 hours most of the yeast growth is done and you can be safe to raise the temp up into the upper 60s/low 70s without fear of generating warm fermentation temp off flavors.

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