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Messages - dmtaylor

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help be interpret this
« on: June 07, 2018, 08:48:38 PM »
Your interpretation of Dr. Cone's theory appears correct.  Dr. Cone's theories, however, deserve more testing.  I honestly don't know what to think until I test it some more.

Remember, Dr. cone was no slouch.  I've been working on his advice for 15 years and find it right on.

We should be clear here so that people reading this don't get the wrong idea: the stuff Dr. Cone proposes is not theory. It's well established and well studied microbiology. We shouldn't entertain the idea that this is something that requires testing to be proved right.

Maybe testing to see how it applies to each individual, but certainly not testing to validate.

We have the Macro-Lager industry to thank for most of what we know about ester and higher alcohol formation and synthesis.

I don't remember.  I never heard of Dr. Cone.  Could be Dr. Seuss for all I knew.  Guess I should look him up sometime.

Regardless, there are few humans in which I would place blind faith, regardless of whether they are doctors or scholars or wrote books or whatever.  They may be right about a lot of stuff, maybe even everything.  But who really knows.

I'll look him up sometime.  But I am not spending much time online this month.  Maybe July.

2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help be interpret this
« on: June 07, 2018, 01:25:21 AM »
Your interpretation of Dr. Cone's theory appears correct.  Dr. Cone's theories, however, deserve more testing.  I honestly don't know what to think until I test it some more.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Speaking of Weizen...
« on: June 01, 2018, 04:51:06 PM »
I've recently read on the BeerAdvocate forum from Bryan "The Beerery" that high pH is actually a *good* thing for hefeweizens......... so probably don't need to add any lactic acid at all!?

Cheers.

4
Beer Recipes / Re: Any Recipe Tweak Ideas?
« on: May 31, 2018, 01:16:25 PM »
That recipe is not bad, but you may want to remove 1 lb of the DME and use 1 lb cane sugar instead.  This will ensure your final gravity is as expected and prevent sticky thickness in the final beer (unless you like it really sweet).  That's where I would start.

You will likely also find this helpful -- it is the grand total summation of everything I wish I knew when I started brewing:


5
The Pub / Re: I finally did it: facebook
« on: May 29, 2018, 08:23:30 PM »
FB is good for a few things, but mostly is a time-waster.  It is also another way for Big Brother to keep tabs on us -- don't overlook that fact.  More don'ts: Don't over-use it, don't over-friend, don't hit "Like" to too many things, don't overreact to any political or religious themes, and don't get addicted, and you'll be alright.

After about 9 years, I'm growing more and more tired of it and try to limit use somewhat.  I'm not an addict, but it *is* an extremely wasteful way to waste time, for times when you have time to waste.  But I really don't use it now as much as I did before, and thank heavens.  It can make you laugh and make you sick all at the same time.  The least amount of time you can spend on FB, the better IMO.

6
I think you nailed it with "not sure all grain is getting cracked in mill". Wheat malt can often be a smaller size than barley malt. Depends on the variety but my guess is you will need to adjust the gap on your mill for you wheat.

This.  Wheat kernels are smaller.  Who is crushing your grains?  LHBS's notoriously have the mill gaps set too wide to crush very well, and might not crush wheat kernels at all.

7
The recipe above for a 6.5gallon batch.  You'll want to adjust for your system/process/efficiency.  At ~5.25g batch at 75%eff you'd want to reduce to ~0.75lb C60, and use 2-2.25lb less malt.... or thereabouts.

Right on.  Great points.  A recipe that works for one brewer might need to be adjusted to work for another brewer.  Always keep it in mind.

8
Kegging and Bottling / Re: beer storage
« on: May 23, 2018, 01:13:10 PM »
No one else might agree with me, but I think it's probably fine to do as you propose as long as the beer is consumed within about 4-6 months.  Aging affects different beers differently, some will show flavor impacts quickly while others will not, but in general they can last "for a while" without refrigeration.  Keep it as cool as you can -- move it to the coolest corner, etc. -- and get an extra refrigerator if possible.

9
I'm finding it difficult to get on your page.  Oxidation is a chemical reaction.  The oxidation doesn't know if it was controlled or poorly handled.

But I'll probably just politely duck out of the conversation now.  Maybe.

It's accelerated by it's environment. If I take a beer in a controlled experiment like Kai's where temperature, etc. are held constant, then that is totally different than beer being distributed with variable temperatures in transport, on the shelf, light exposure, etc. You have control over one and not the other.

I'm not sure it matters.  As I basically said previously, if it tastes good, I'll drink it, either way.  And it does, so I do.

10
I'm finding it difficult to get on your page.  Oxidation is a chemical reaction.  The oxidation doesn't know if it was controlled or poorly handled.

But I'll probably just politely duck out of the conversation now.  Maybe.

11
if you have ever tasted the Kibbles'N'Bits/Soy Sauce Doppelbock that is naturally or artificially made past its prime through age or poor handling

I have never tasted dog food or soy sauce in a German beer.  Never.  But maybe I just have a sh**ty palate.

12
Thanks for sharing this.  It's been tossed around for decades whether aging on the shelf is what gives lagers "that German flavor", or "it".  I'm sure many will say "no way in hell, that's totally wrong".  But, why not experiment and find out.  I don't have the answers on this.  I'll just say what I always say: more experiments are needed.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: lemon flavor
« on: May 22, 2018, 09:05:44 PM »
and dont forget Sorachi Ace hops... late addition and dry hop.

That's more like dill to me than lemon.

14
As I'd indicated previously (and copied below), based on my reviews of the genome study results, I didn't think 1056 and WLP051 could be equivalent.  I wasn't sure if 1056 might be a lager yeast, while WLP051 probably IS a lager yeast.

EDIT: And... forgot to mention... I *do* believe Sierra Nevada is 1056.  WLP051 on the other hand is supposedly Anchor Liberty.  Source: http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm

...to be clear, WLP051 and Wyeast 1056 are NOT equivalent.  They are very very distant cousins.

BRY-96 = Wyeast 1056, AND NOTHING ELSE!  NOTHING else is exactly equivalent!  1056 is unique!

BRY-97 = WLP051 = 1272, AND NOTHING ELSE!  Nothing else is exactly equivalent!  And if I'm right in my interpretation as explained above, then all 3 of these might be pastorianus...

...the pastorianus *might* indeed be limited to just BRY-97 = WLP051 = 1272...

EDIT #2: Hell... now expert "qq" says he doesn't think 1272 is actually the same as WLP051, but rather is more closely related to WLP002 and WLP007... and "German" ale yeast WLP029!  He found a different study separating 1272 from WLP051.  To be clear: Of all these, WLP051 is the only one identified verily as pastorianus.  http://beer.suregork.com/?p=4000

Hmm.... gonna be a while longer before we get all this stuff straight.

15
The Pub / Re: Beer brewed with Great Lakes Water
« on: May 20, 2018, 04:15:04 PM »

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