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Messages - ANDREW.GROGAN1

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1
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 09:17:07 AM »
No. Grains of dry yeast.

Boy do I feel dumb. Thanks for clarifying. 

2
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 09:06:23 AM »
A few grains per bottle would be fine, but a syringe will work well too. Adding all that bourbon would take your ABV to ~12.5%. This coupled with the amount of time may have been too much for the yeasts that were still around.

Do you mean un crushed grain?  The idea being that  the yeast in the grain with get with the sugar and carbonate?

3
Kegging and Bottling / Re: No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 07:06:13 AM »
Depending on how high the alcohol was, coupled with 6 month old yeast, maybe they just didn't have it in them to carbonate. You might try a touch of dry champagne yeast in each bottle, then recap.

I thought about this too but how much is a touch?  I need some level of control.  Don't want fountain soda or a bunch of bottle bombs. 

4
Kegging and Bottling / No carbonation on first barrel aged beer
« on: December 26, 2016, 06:41:05 AM »
Just opened a bottle from my first barrel aged beer.  15 gallon Imperial stout...

Brewed: 6/24
Into the bourbon barrel: 8/3
Bottled: 12/3

Used my normal bottling routine off boiling water/sugar mixture and adding to the bottling bucket.  I also added 1.25 liters of bourbon to the barrel to achieve the bourbon flavor I was looking for.  I opened my first bottle yesterday and there is no carbonation.  Do I need to give it more time or did I not bottle correctly for the amount of time it was in the barrel?  Did I kill the yeast by adding the bourbon?  FG going into the barrel had it at about 10.5% and the Scottish Ale yeast I used is rated up to 12%.

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stuck fermentation?
« on: December 03, 2016, 09:43:36 AM »
That FG is very indicative of a high mash temp and higher amounts of cara's.  As a general rule of thumb for me a FG of 1.020 is about 160 mash temp. I bet it's done.

I know this is a real newbie question but I am still learning about all the aspect of all grain brewing, including grains.

Are you considering the roasted/dark malts in my recipe the same as a cara's in terms of the unfermentables they bring to a recipe?

Yes.  Your grist bill has a major effect on fermentability, mash temp less so.


What could I do next time to make a little more fermentable but maintain the flavor I have achieved.  I am pretty happy with how it taste and it fits to the style.

6
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Stuck fermentation?
« on: December 03, 2016, 09:25:48 AM »
That FG is very indicative of a high mash temp and higher amounts of cara's.  As a general rule of thumb for me a FG of 1.020 is about 160 mash temp. I bet it's done.

I know this is a real newbie question but I am still learning about all the aspect of all grain brewing, including grains.

Are you considering the roasted/dark malts in my recipe the same as a cara's in terms of the unfermentables they bring to a recipe?

7
Yeast and Fermentation / Stuck fermentation?
« on: December 03, 2016, 08:52:28 AM »
I have an English Brown ale that has been fermenting since 11/18.  I used Wyeast 1450 and I'm stuck at 1.020.  I was hoping to get closer to 1.010.  I started at 1.055.  Should I add more yeast or just let it ride another week and bottle.  I am happy with how it currently taste but I have never had a beer finish this high so I am not sure what to do.  Recipe listed below. 

Mashed single infusion @ 156 (Although it may have been a little higher)

Maris Otter- 65.2 %
Caramel/Crystal Malt- 10.9 %
Flaked Oats- 8.7 %
Victory- 4 6.5 %
Brown Malt- 5 5.4 %
Chocolate Malt-6 3.3 %
Wyeast 1450- Denny's Favorite

8
Other Fermentables / OG of unfermented cider
« on: October 15, 2016, 10:37:52 AM »
Do you take the OG of cider the same way you do beer?  I just got back from picking up my unfermented cider from the local orchard and one of the guys there insisted you have to take you cider reading with a grain of salt.  He said all the excess fiber and pectin in the cider can keep you form getting an accurate gravity reading.


9
Other Fermentables / Timing of pectic enzyme in cider fermentation
« on: October 12, 2016, 02:42:52 PM »
When is the right time to add pectic enzyme to a hard cider fermentation?  This is my second year doing cider.  Last year I added it at the start of primary and again when I racked it for ageing/secondary.  Cider came out fine but curious as to when you are suppose to add it.

10
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 6 weeks in primary too long?
« on: September 20, 2016, 12:44:39 PM »
The only thing I would be concerned about is if you primary is in a plastic bucket.  You may get some oxidation.

6 gallon plastic better bottle carboy


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11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 6 weeks in primary too long?
« on: September 20, 2016, 07:04:38 AM »
It is in a 6 gallon better bottle carboy


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12
Yeast and Fermentation / 6 weeks in primary too long?
« on: September 19, 2016, 04:51:23 PM »
I have a beer that hit 4 weeks in primary yesterday. Normally I would have kegged it but I ran out of time. I leave tomorrow for a 2 week work trip. Am I risking it leaving it in primary for 6 weeks?

13
Yeast and Fermentation / Wyeast 1968 coagulating on stir plate
« on: September 18, 2016, 06:59:12 AM »
Is it normal for wyeast 1968 is coagulate on the the stir plate?  I have never seen this before but it's my first time using this yeast.


14
Kegging and Bottling / Re: My beer cold crashed in the keg
« on: September 11, 2016, 04:59:11 AM »
Leave it, It's normal. 3711 is a bear to drop clear and the first pulls are always cloudy. The yeast will pack down and the beer will clear as the tube will form a little yeast free zone. Don't move the keg often and you won't have issues with yeast again.

Also, why did you put it in a bucket before a keg? Go straight from the fermenter next time.

I did go right from the fermenter. I just had a little over 5 gallons so a little overflow went into a bucket. Should have worded that better.


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15
Kegging and Bottling / My beer cold crashed in the keg
« on: September 11, 2016, 04:37:53 AM »
I brewed a rye saison and used Wyeast 3711.  After 4 weeks and a packet of super kleer, I thought I was as clear as I could get with this yeast and I kegged it.  It's been in the keg for a week and I pulled a sample yesterday.  The beer is very yeasty. 

I remembered that when I was kegging, I had approximately 12 oz left in the bucket that I had put in a 12oz bottle and stuck in the fridge.  I tried that this morning and it is super clear.

I think the time in the fridge causes most of the yeast to drop out.  I know going forward, I should probably cold crash it but my question is, is there any harm in racking what is in the keg into my bottling bucket to get it off all the yeast in the bottom and then rack it back into the keg.  I imagine the kegged beer is so cloudy because in tube is sitting in the yeast bed that the cold crash caused.  My concern is oxidation and that the beer is at about 80% of what I want to carbonation level.       

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