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Messages - jimpdx

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Thanks for sharing.  I think I'm going to add a column to mine to display "brew date", calculating back from the due date the number of weeks a particular style is at it's peak.

Yes customize it to your heart's content. I have added other things like fees, club points earned, etc. I hope to be able to feed competitions directly into the sheet from BJCP XML feed. Going to ask Jamil about that tonight since he built the BJCP integration for AHA's comp calendar.

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So about three years ago I started entering lots of competitions and wanted a way to track all my scores, upcoming deadlines, links to comp websites, etc. I built a Google Sheet that a number of our homebrew club (Oregon Brew Crew) members use and I realized that I never posted it to AHA.



Each entry (name/style) is listed as a column with upcoming competitions listed down the left (plus location and number of bottles required). Place a "X" for each entry you plan on submitting or a "B" to highlight beers you still need to bottle I like to link the name of the competition to the comp website. Input the event date and deadline. Column C will calculate the number of days you have until the deadline. I erase the deadline cell once I have shipped or dropped off my entries. Once scores come back, just enter the final number and it will average all the scores at the bottom and color-code according to BJCP score ranges (Fair, Good, Very Good, Excellent, etc).

This is a free template that anyone with a Google Account can access and use. Go to File -> Make A Copy, then look for it at http://drive.google.com under "My Drive". Feel free to use it and shoot me an email if you have any questions or comments!

Click here to view the template

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Homebrew Competitions / 15th Annual Oregon Brew Crew Fall Classic
« on: September 14, 2016, 04:56:21 AM »


The Oregon Brew Crew's
15th Annual Fall Classic
Homebrew Competition

November 5th, 2016
Deadline: 5pm October 28th, 2016


Registration: http://fallclassic.oregonbrewcrew.org

Hosted by Ecliptic Brewing
825 N Cook St, Portland, OR 97227
             
Best IPA - Sponsored by Breakside Brewery
Best Cider - Sponsored by Rev. Nats Hard Cider
Best Scottish - Sponsored by Ancestry Brewing

Entry Categories

All BJCP recognized categories are eligible for entry into this competition (23 beer, 3 mead, 2 cider). Recognized categories will be judged to the 2015 BJCP Style Guidelines. Categories may be combined to expedite judging. Awards will be given to all category winners!

Special Categories

Best New Homebrewer
These entries must be a homebrewers first EVER entry into ANY homebrew competition. Please write "THIS IS MY FIRST COMPETITION" on the top of your bottle ID tags. Winner will be best overall SCORING entry from a new homebrewer.

Best Fresh/Wet Hop Beer
These entries must be made entirely from fresh/wet hops harvested from the current hop crop. Hops can be commercially obtained or homegrown. Please specify the hop varieties used and the base style of the beer for the judges to consider. Judging will be based on the fresh hop character present and how well they are integrated with the declared base style.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Hitting you mash pH
« on: December 18, 2015, 07:06:58 PM »
After you take your mash ph reading at 15 mins how do you calculate how much acid or baking soda to add?  The spreadsheets all seem to focus on pre brew session planning, not adjustments along the way.

Excellent point! I look back at previous brew logs and I see where I added say 8ml of lactic acid and saw a drop of 0.3 pH, and adjust for the batch size. It is a rough approximation but usually gets me close. I don't think I ever found a calculator for those adjustments. Great idea @MartinBrugard for next version! :)

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Hitting you mash pH
« on: December 18, 2015, 05:51:44 PM »
Here is the question that has been bugging me lately. Even using Brun' Water I rarely hit my target. I have written to Martin about it and re-tested my water so I must be doing something else wrong. But regardless, I pull a sample about 15 minutes into the initial mash rest, cool it over ice water, take the measurement. Once I know what adjustment to make, it ends up being 25-30 minutes before I can nail my pH. Does this cause any issues? Ideally I would nail the pH target immediately but since I am sometimes high and sometimes low, I can't exactly make a blanket adjustment in advance. In general, my new theory is to stick with absolutely minimal adjustments. I think part of my problem has been TOO MANY adjustments.

For example on a recent Wee Heavy I had 10 different grains in my malt bill - 45 pounds on a 12G batch. I wanted to accentuate body, maltiness, roundness, sweetness, etc. In order to hit a 5.4 mash pH I had calculated the following additions (added to mash only) with pretty soft/clean Portland water:
  • Gypsum - 4g
  • Calcium Chloride - 8g
  • Epsom Salt - 6g
  • Baking Soda - 5g

With these additions I should have produced the following mash water:
  • Calcium - 66ppm
  • Magnesium - 11ppm
  • Sodium - 27ppm
  • Sulfate - 77ppm
  • Chloride - 90ppm
  • Bicarbonate - 82ppm

20 minutes into the mash my first pH reading was 5.7. I was able to get it down to 5.4 using 3/4tsp of Lactic Acid. But that adjustment took place 1/2 way into the mash. Should I not worry about the 30 minutes of the mash sitting at the higher pH?

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Registration is now available at http://fallclassic2015.oregonbrewcrew.org/. You may list your entries beginning August 1st. Hope to see lots of entries!

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Dear fellow AHA members,

I am excited to tell you about this great competition coming up in a few months here in Portland, OR. I may be biased, but this is my favorite event (probably because it was the FIRST competition I submitted to). We are still finalizing some amazing sponsors and prizes but trust me, you won't want to miss out! If you are local to the Pacific Northwest, we are always looking for judges and stewards as well.



The Oregon Brew Crew's 14th Annual Fall Classic Competition
October 24, 2015


Entries due THURSDAY October 15, 2015

Event Website
http://oregonbrewcrew.org/fallclassic

Event Location
13 Virtues Brewing Company
6410 SE Milwaukie Ave, Portland, OR 97202

Entry Categories
All BJCP recognized categories (23 beer, 3 mead, 2 cider) are eligible for entry into this competition.

Special Categories
Fresh Hop category: these entries must be made entirely from fresh/wet hops harvested from the current hop crop. Hops can be commercially obtained or homegrown. Please specify the hop varieties used and the base style of the beer for the judges to consider. Judging will be based on the fresh hop character present and how well they are integrated with the declared base style.

Best New Homebrewer: these entries must be a homebrewers first EVER entry into ANY homebrew competition. Please write "THIS IS MY FIRST COMPETITION" on the top of your bottle ID tags. Winner will be best overall SCORING entry from a new homebrewer.

Entry & Judge Registration
You can register and pay for entries ($7 each) and register to judge or steward online on Monday, July 27th!
Thank you for your interest in the Fall Classic, the Oregon Brew Crew's yearly AHA/BJCP sanctioned homebrew competition held after hop harvest.

Any comments or questions may be directed to competition@oregonbrewcrew.org

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Screwed up my big black IPA
« on: May 11, 2015, 04:01:39 PM »
So it has been two weeks in primary and this beer has already evolved into a pretty good tasting "Black Ale". The roast character is still very prominent but no longer unappealing as it smooths out. Reminds me to never judge the final product only one week into fermentation (and of course before carbonation). My neighbor thinks a long swim in my bourbon barrel would compliment the roast flavors and give it more time to mellow so I will rack the remaining 11G into my 10G Tuthilltown bourbon barrel. Also a friend who has brewed hundreds of batches (and works at my LHBS) says he has done 15% roasted adjuncts before and had it turn out wonderfully. Time will tell but I am definitely not giving up!

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Screwed up my big black IPA
« on: May 06, 2015, 05:56:33 PM »
Thanks everyone for your input! Multiple mistakes on this one for sure, and as always a great learning experience. I am going to transfer the 12 gallons to secondary with some vanilla beans and wait it out. I might even make a 10 gallon stovetop batch with LME (American Pale Ale) and blend it downstream. Clearly nowhere near a Black IPA but I might end up with an enjoyable dark ale of some sort. The combination of heavy roast, fully body, high IBU and low ABV is interesting.

I added enough Baking Soda to keep the mash pH within range, although I wish I had an accurate reading. Estimated mash pH is almost always different than reality, no matter how good your software or spreadsheet is.

Ill try to post updates on how the flavor evolves.

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Screwed up my big black IPA
« on: May 06, 2015, 03:18:13 AM »
Any thoughts/comments on Munich as a base malt? Has anyone ever done this with 60-70% Munich?

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Screwed up my big black IPA
« on: May 06, 2015, 03:09:06 AM »
What was water profile and PH?

Well unfortunately I was "between" pH Meters at the time. My last one broke before brewday and new one hadn't arrived yet. However I use Bru'N Water pretty extensively and went with the suggested additions to hit a 5.3 mash pH. For a 12 gallon batch I used:
  • 6 grams Baking Soda
  • 4 grams Gypsum
  • 0.7ml Lactic Acid (sparge only)

We have pretty soft, simple water in Portland (OR). Here is my latest report:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ecc6e49k9b83n38/WardLab-Water1.pdf?dl=0

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All Grain Brewing / Re: Screwed up my big black IPA
« on: May 05, 2015, 11:14:01 PM »
16.7% roasted malt seems like way too much to me.

Normally I would agree but I thought that "bitterless" or dehusked malts would express themselves in a "softer" more mellow way. And maybe they will after secondary? I'm sipping another sample off primary now and it is not nearly as acrid as two days ago! Definitely a heavy roast element and still a med-full body. I was thinking of adding some vanilla beans in secondary and see where that takes it...

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All Grain Brewing / Screwed up my big black IPA
« on: May 05, 2015, 10:30:37 PM »
First post on AHA forum, nice to meet all of you. Have been homebrewing about 6 years and done around 50 batches. I decided to brew up 12 gallons of a CDA/Black IPA. One of my favorite breweries had posted this on their Facebook page when I inquired about one of my favorite dark hoppy beers of theirs:

Quote
Midnight wheat ,Carmel Munich , Munich ,soarchi ace , citra, cascades . $4# per bbl . FG 1.018 usually

I ended up with the following grain bill based on some research:

  • 72.7% Munich
  • 10.6% Caramunich
  • 10.6% Midnight Wheat
  • 6.1% Carafa Special II

Having recently learned that Vienna and Munich are only slightly more kilned than pale 2-row, I assumed it was a safe base malt that would contribute lots of body and malt sweetness to standup to the 85 IBU I had planned. I included two bitterless black malts since many CDA recipes feature Carafa II and I wanted more dark malt than just the midnight wheat.

After a healthy pitched starter of 1056 with pure O2 and nutrients in the boil, the ferment completely died at 1.030 (from OG 1.072). I know that 1056 can hit 75-78% attentuation so this puzzled me. Looking at my daily temps, the fermenter had reached 78 degrees which I do all the time with Belgian strains but I understand that upper 60s, lower 70s is better for this strain. I swirled the fermenter and added some yeast energizer but no joy.

The resulting samples from primary after 7-10 days are fairly acrid and bordering on the dreaded "ashtray" descriptor I have seen thrown around, and an extremely full body. I did more research on Munich as a base malt and although you get conflicting answers, many seem to say that it should not exceed 30%. While it may have not as much diastatic enzyme, I *did* hit my OG after all so I got good conversion. I kept the mash between 148 and 154 - both of which should provide enough fermentables to have a lower final gravity, or even a lower gravity after primary.

I don't really want to pour 12 gallons of this down the drain but not seeing many other options. I thought about diluting it with some distilled water, blending it with a lighter second batch or even throwing in Champagne yeast. However losing more sweetness will only further exaggerate the crazy high bitterness, which I don't believe will fade all that much over time.

Any suggestions, ideas, comments?

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