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Messages - homoeccentricus

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1
Beers in which I have enjoyed a certain amount of oxidation : gueuze, quadruple, Orval, barley wine.

Once brought home a large box of German beers bought in a beer shop in Bonn. Organized a beer tasting two months later. Result: all beers poured down the drain because of oxidation.

There's a difference...

2
Maybe I'll manage dactylic hexameter in a post someday.

I heard your diacetylic hexameter skills are phenomenal, so it's only a short way to go!

3
A friend brought beer a flat single barrel lambic (or was it gueuze?) from Belgium in a wine-in-a-box bladder.  I could see why sour beers are often blended.  Like homoeccentricus said, would be easy to add fruit or blend in a younger sour.
Geuze is by definition Iambic that is bottled and quite carbonated, no?
Yes. Gueuze does not come in a box.
Now, where did I put that u I'm missing?  Apparently I've been misspelling "gueuze."  My apologies to Belgians everywhere.  Well, to Frank at least.
No, it's geuze in Dutch and gueuze in French. I normally use the Dutch version, I simply thought most English people use the French version. Hey, now I'm confused too :(

4
A friend brought beer a flat single barrel lambic (or was it gueuze?) from Belgium in a wine-in-a-box bladder.  I could see why sour beers are often blended.  Like homoeccentricus said, would be easy to add fruit or blend in a younger sour.
Geuze is by definition Iambic that is bottled and quite carbonated, no?
Yes. Gueuze does not come in a box.

5
Trust me, it's good. I've also used simple lambic to add fruit myself.
Correction, it cán be good, for instance when it's kriek from Girardin ;)

6
Trust me, it's good. I've also used simple lambic to add fruit myself.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Invincible Rumors
« on: April 11, 2018, 05:20:13 PM »
My invincible rumor: it's not because someone says that something is an invincible rumor that it is an invincible rumor.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Potassium metabisulfate
« on: March 28, 2018, 08:27:36 AM »
You could consider using Antioxin SB or its equivalent after fermentation: add 2-4 grams per 100 liter of 50% metabisulfite and 50% ascorbic acid.

It's interesting to note that the same company that produces Antioxin SB (AEB Group) also produces Antioxin SBT, which contains 10% gallotannins, and is used in the mash. So implicitly they are recommending against using gallotannins after fermentation.

9
Ingredients / Re: cherries
« on: March 12, 2018, 01:14:05 PM »
Schaarbeek cherries are almost impossible to find in the US.

Same in Belgium :(

10
Ingredients / Re: cherries
« on: March 11, 2018, 10:44:40 PM »
Never, ever put sweet cherries in lambic.
Belgium thanks you.

11
I went back to a 10 minute charge in my IPA and I think it tastes way better.

+1

If anything, I think early boil additions other than a small bittering charge are out of favor.

And, to take the assertions here and twist them around, what does a whirpool accomplish that can't be done better with dry hopping (both during and after active fermentation)?

In my experience, whirlpool hops give a different character than dry hops. Dry hops can't be beat for that big blast of aroma when you stick your nose in the glass, and they are at least part of the equation when looking for that "juicy" character. Whirlpool hops tend to leave more of an enduring flavor that lingers on the palate. To me, whirlpool hops seem less "fruit juice" in flavor than dry hops. Neither are strictly better than the other, but I do think they give different results.

For my part, I have moved to just one large whirlpool/hop stand addition for my IPA's - no boil or dry hops. It is as much for simplicity in the brewing process as it is for flavor, though. I don't necessarily see it as "better" than boil or dry hopping from a flavor standpoint, but it gets me a beer that I thoroughly enjoy and keeps my brewday simpler.
Also interested in skipping dry hopping. What do you call large?
2-4 oz/gallon (about 15-30g/L). For my IPAs I whirlpool hot (immediately after flameout) for about 45-90 minutes. I get the right quality of bitterness for my tastes with this kind of addition (firm, but not abrasive).

I don't know if this is necessarily a replacement for dry hops, but it's generally "good enough" for me. I'm just to busy/lazy to be messing around with dry hops lately. You can certainly use dry hops in addition to the whirlpool to really max out the hop character.
A 90 minute whirlpool? The Gods of Low Oxygen will throw me off the Tarpeian Rock   if I dare do this.

12
I went back to a 10 minute charge in my IPA and I think it tastes way better.

+1

If anything, I think early boil additions other than a small bittering charge are out of favor.

And, to take the assertions here and twist them around, what does a whirpool accomplish that can't be done better with dry hopping (both during and after active fermentation)?

In my experience, whirlpool hops give a different character than dry hops. Dry hops can't be beat for that big blast of aroma when you stick your nose in the glass, and they are at least part of the equation when looking for that "juicy" character. Whirlpool hops tend to leave more of an enduring flavor that lingers on the palate. To me, whirlpool hops seem less "fruit juice" in flavor than dry hops. Neither are strictly better than the other, but I do think they give different results.

For my part, I have moved to just one large whirlpool/hop stand addition for my IPA's - no boil or dry hops. It is as much for simplicity in the brewing process as it is for flavor, though. I don't necessarily see it as "better" than boil or dry hopping from a flavor standpoint, but it gets me a beer that I thoroughly enjoy and keeps my brewday simpler.
Also interested in skipping dry hopping. What do you call large?

13
TPL (total potential maltiness) = grams of malt per liter finished beer

IBU (which ever metric you prefer) because hopping reduces perceived maltiness

SRM÷2  because color increases perception of maltiness, but it's not linear

TPL ÷ IBU × SRM/2 = RMF (Raw Maltiness Factor)

If RMF is greater than 100:
RMF - Max IMF (100) equals CF (Correction Factor)
RMF - CF = IMF

If RMF is less than 13, just use IMF 13. The IMF is not mean spirited.

FAQs:

Q: Why no calculation concerning Yeast/Fermentation effects?

A: Because without any Malt the yeast would just lay there asking stupid questions. So, any flavors that might be thought to originate with yeast are actually from malt.

Q: Why no calculation concerning unmalted grains, or adjuncts?

A: Some things require a higher level of understanding, and you're just not there yet. Roll with it, and one day it will come to you.

Q: Why not just describe the maltiness of beer using words?

A: Who let this moron in here? No further questions!

So make two beers, exactly the same in every way except one is made with 100% pils mout, and the other with 100% maris otter. They will both have the same IMF. I assume that's a feature of your algorithm, not a bug.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Biotransformation
« on: February 05, 2018, 01:34:23 PM »
Another vote that it's baloney.

Sometimes I'm wrong.  But sometimes I'm right.
It's a statistics thing. If you always say that everything is baloney, then you are right every time you are actually served baloney. Just kidding. You are awesome!

15
Ingredients / Re: grams per gallon of "Trifecta mix"
« on: January 29, 2018, 02:06:12 PM »
A distant member of my family emigrated to Canada after the war. He called himself Mike, but his real name was Marcel. From now on you are Marcel.
     My Grandmother and her brothers came to Canada first and then on to KC. I remember the story of Grandmother being bullied in school in the US because her last name sounded like  the Kaiser.
De Keyser :)
That's right her name was De Keyer. I'm part Irish and part Belgian so I have to like beer ;)

The best of both worlds: an alcoholic addicted to good beer!

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