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Messages - jimmykx250

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1
All Things Food / Re: Brussels Sprouts & Bacon
« on: February 16, 2017, 03:17:17 AM »
My wife and I love that dish. Although I throw  pound of bacon in a big fry pan cook until half way done then dump most the grease off throw in the sprouts and cook covering the pan with tin foil. Like you said the house smells just unbeliveble.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: How long does it take you to brew a beer?
« on: February 11, 2017, 01:45:11 PM »
BIAB no chlll 5.5 gal batch 3 to 4 hours cleaned up start to finish.

3
Equipment and Software / Re: pH probes
« on: February 07, 2017, 03:29:26 AM »
So when do you guys take your ph readings? If its at the 15 min mark in the mash do you draw a sample and let it cool before reading with your meter? I noticed the thermoworks model im looking at says it has temperature compensation built in.
The temp compensation is to accommodate the different ph at different temps and not to adjust the reading to what it would be at room temp.

Thanks for all that good info!

I pull a small sample at 10 minutes and put it in the freezer for about 10 minutes to test.

Thanks Steve
Any opinions on the thermowoks stuff? Thermometers are stellar.

I cannot state for Thermoworks but as far as temperature goes:

Most pH electrodes are made of General Purpose (GP) glass. The rule of thumb for GP glass is
At 25 oC expect 1-2 years
At 50 oC expect 6 month to 1 year
At 75 oC expect 3-6 months
At 100 oC expect less than 1 month.

The guidelines are for probes in continuous use. I would expect a longer time for probes that are used intermittently.

It would be recommended to cool samples to less than 140 oF (60 oC). If it is planned to measure at a higher temperature then a pH electrode with high temperature (HT) glass would be recommended. The HT glass has a higher resistance at 25 oC than GP glass. As the temperature increases then resistance decreases. The HT glass resistance at high temperature approaches that of GP glass at an ambient temperature.

The temperature compensation is used for voltage response as according to the Nernst equation for membrane potentials.  For a meter with manual temperature compensation it is important to adjust the calibration trimmer to match the value on the bottle at a specific temperature. The value on the bottle is the actual pH of that solution at a given temperature. For example pH 7.01 and 4.01 at 25oC.

4
Equipment and Software / Re: pH probes
« on: February 06, 2017, 11:21:41 AM »
So when do you guys take your ph readings? If its at the 15 min mark in the mash do you draw a sample and let it cool before reading with your meter? I noticed the thermoworks model im looking at says it has temperature compensation built in.
The temp compensation is to accommodate the different ph at different temps and not to adjust the reading to what it would be at room temp.

I pull a small sample at 10 minutes and put it in the freezer for about 10 minutes to test.

Thanks Steve
Any opinions on the thermowoks stuff? Thermometers are stellar.

5
Equipment and Software / Re: pH probes
« on: February 06, 2017, 11:12:21 AM »
So when do you guys take your ph readings? If its at the 15 min mark in the mash do you draw a sample and let it cool before reading with your meter? I noticed the thermoworks model im looking at says it has temperature compensation built in.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: State of the Forum
« on: January 27, 2017, 11:35:58 AM »
I have to be honest I saw the LODO post and never even read it. Need to keep things as simple as i can.

7
Ingredients / whats up with Niko brew?
« on: January 17, 2017, 01:02:55 PM »
I noticed homebrew finds advertised they had a sale going on the other day and the website has been down the last couple days. Any one know anything?

8
Ingredients / Re: Red X pH
« on: January 17, 2017, 12:20:34 PM »
I have not liked either of the two beers I've made with Red X even though I have liked commercial beers with large amounts in the grist. I finally jumped aboard the pH meter bandwagon and tested my batch of Red X and it came in at 5.17 or so. Fudging the color in Bru'n water tells me that my mash pH was 4.95 for one and 5.1 for the other. Could certainly explain why the beers were awful.

So I'm going to need to try another Red X based beer very soon.

Anybody else notice this?
Stevie-
What do you use currently to check ph? Im still looking at meters but VERY hesitant.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Glass Disaster
« on: January 09, 2017, 11:32:30 AM »
Right.  I used mine for many many years.  They can be used safely.

Having them around my kids though made the risk analysis a bit different for me.

I'd rather not worry about it.

Funny you say that. I have a 13 year old daughter that is an accident looking for a place to happen so I tried selling the 2 i have on craigs list and got tired of the bs. Drove to my my LHBS and said lets make a deal i don't want these in my home. I walked out with 2 packs of omega yeast and a clear mind. They make a few bucks and they are out of my house! win win for everyone.

10
All Grain Brewing / Re: First BIAB step by step brew questions
« on: January 04, 2017, 03:05:29 AM »
All good advice here. Get the biggest pot you can swing. I went with an alum for budget reasons and have had no problems. A couple thick beach towels thrown across the top hold the temp just fine for an hour mash. I think you will like the biab process for its simplicity. For me it means brewing at all as i just dont get 6 hours to blow on a multi vessel brew set up. I admit if i could i would!

11
Ingredients / Re: Zesting method?
« on: December 29, 2016, 11:57:02 AM »
Micro plane is the way to fly. Good tools in the kitchen are invaluable. But the good stuff once. Peeler will get the white stuff too.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

12
All Things Food / Re: Bread
« on: December 22, 2016, 03:11:20 AM »
recpie?

13
All Things Food / Re: Bread
« on: December 21, 2016, 02:44:50 AM »
FWIW i have made some pretty nice loafs doing the no knead method as well. Granted they are not sandwich loafs but tasty just the same. Nothing like warm home made bread.

14
The Pub / Re: Howdy
« on: December 20, 2016, 11:25:05 AM »
Jim-
I still owe you some barrel aged barleywine for the hops you sent. Expect a package in the spring when freezing threat is gone! Glad all is ok.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's the coldest I can brew?
« on: December 15, 2016, 07:40:03 AM »
I used the 'no chill' method several times (maybe 15) with that same container after hearing about it on Basic Brewing.  I was surprised by how well it worked, given the historical dogma about slow chilling being terrible.  The thing that I found the most problematic with it was that I couldn't get completely reproducible results.  I think the chilling time would change depending on outside temperature (-20F to +50F) and that would impact the hop character of the beer.  That probably isn't a problem making malty styles, but for pale ales or the like it can move things around a bit.
Ive been using the same 2 containers for well over a year! I even bought 2 extra screw on lids and mounted bubblers in them so I can ferment in them. Easy to clean a little pbw and hot water. After washing i store it with a 1/2 gal of star san to keep it bug free. Ive never noticed the reproducible thing however when I re-brew the same beer I always change one variable or another cause im always trying to improve the beer.
 

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