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Messages - uintafly

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 15, 2013, 03:57:51 PM »
I think I need to go home and fool around with the spreasheets for a bit. I did for a bit yesterday and it seemed fairly straight forward. Thanks for everyones help on this.  I had a physics professor once say that  chemistry is nothing more interesting than baking a cake adn if I really wanted to discover the secrets of the universe I needed to be a physicist. I don't necessarily want to discover the secrets of the univeres, but the secrets to great beer would be nice.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Be afraid, be very afraid
« on: August 15, 2013, 03:49:04 PM »
Is it really that hard to pack in a few tall boys of Torpedo IPA? I think this is another example of a solution looking for a problem.

Depends on how long your going for. I like to do a fair amount of backpacking and usually will bring along a few for the first night, but if I am gone for a week there's no way to have a nice beer after the first day. Since there ain't much better in this world than to be at 11,000' after 10 miles of hiking, and standing in a river with a flypole and beer, I'd be willing to give it a try. Wouldn't really be expecting anything great, but hell, after eating dehydrated lasagna for 5 nights my standards are low.

FYI: If you think you like beer now, spend a week hiking 75 miles and get to your car and your dry ice cooler and crack a cold one. That's true heaven!

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 15, 2013, 03:29:32 PM »
No don't add any acid malt - it'll lower your pH more.  What profile are you using ?  5.2 is low for that style (and most others). Since you are using RO I would use the software to add baking soda to get your pH up to 5.3 or 5.4. That'll put you at a more desireable pH.

I am pretty sure I was using the Pale Ale profile, but I am not sure because I downloaded it on a different computer. I guess I am a little surprised that I would be too low on the pH with this recipe. I was under the impression that it was very difficult to get too low without having a higher proportion of roasted malts. Is this not accurate?

+1 to all of what Mort said. Bru'nWater takes the guesswork out.

So after leaving tab 1 and 2 blank in BrunWater (because I am using RO), and entering in my additions of gypsum and calcium chloride in tab 3 (Water Adjustment), and inputting my recipe in Mash Acidification it gives an estimated pH of 5.2. So does that mean I should leave it be at that point? No need to add the acidulated malt right?

sounds right. Just to check did you set the dilution % to 100 and the dilution water to RO?

Yes I did add that part in, I should have mentioned that originally.

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 14, 2013, 05:09:33 PM »
+1 to all of what Mort said. Bru'nWater takes the guesswork out.

So after leaving tab 1 and 2 blank in BrunWater (because I am using RO), and entering in my additions of gypsum and calcium chloride in tab 3 (Water Adjustment), and inputting my recipe in Mash Acidification it gives an estimated pH of 5.2. So does that mean I should leave it be at that point? No need to add the acidulated malt right?

5
All Grain Brewing / 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 14, 2013, 03:36:37 PM »
So I am finally starting to take a look at water chemistry, but I want to try to keep it simple. I don't have a way to measure Ph and probably won't anytime soon (new skis and a season pass makes to afraid to float the idea by wife). After doing a little research about my local water (very high alkalinity, but limited available info on much else) and the fact that I can get RO water for .35/gal, I have decided to build from RO.

Here's the recipe for an American Red:

Pale Malt 2-Row (Muntons) 9.5 lb. 74.8%
Victory .5 lb.  3.9%
Crystal (40L) 1 lb.  7.9%
Munich Malt 1 lb. 7.9%
Crystal (120L) .5 lb.  3.9%
Chocolate .2 lb.  1.6%

.5 oz Magnum @ 60 min
.5 oz. Centennial @ 10 min
.5 oz Cascade @ 10 min
.5 oz. Centennial @ 0 min
.5 oz Cascade @ 0 min

US-05 yeast
Mash @ 153 for 60 minutes (Batch sparge)

For the water I was planning on adding 1 teaspoon of calcium chloride and 1 teaspoon gypsum to my 5 gallons of strike water and 6 oz. acidulated malt into my grist.   For the sparge I am probably just going to use the RO water.

Any advice on water chemistry for this recipe, or just in general is much appreciated.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Happy Surprise
« on: August 07, 2013, 07:17:29 PM »
So while cleaning my fruit room a couple days ago I noticed a 12 pack box of swing top bottles I had lost track of. Since I knew I would be bottling today I went down to grab em and clean up and realized some of them were full of beer. ::) It took me a minute to realize they were from a batch that turned our bad on a Westmalle Tripel I brewed a few years ago. I had nothing but problem with the batch including a blown lid off of my fermenter and a storage room covered in wort. heh beer never rounded into anything good in the 6 months of aging I gave it and ended up dumping the rest (or so I thought).

Anyway, long story short I decided to taste one before dumping the bottles and it was actually really good! They were swing top bottles so I resealed the one I opened and put it in the fridge to see how it would be cold. Other than suffering from chill haze it's fantastic. Went back and checked my notes to see I brewed it on 3/11/11. So it only took 29 months of cellering to round into shape.  ;D

I ended up taking it as a sign that the universe didn't want me to bottle today. So I relaxed and had a homebrew!    8)

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Yesteray's (mis)adventure
« on: August 05, 2013, 06:09:59 PM »
Nice to know I'm not alone! I won't worry about it especially since I hit my target OG. And whoever suggested folding the IC so it's not over the kettle, that's a great (and easy) idea to avoid this in the future.

PS: How did you old timers survive your first few years without the Internet? ;)

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Yesteray's (mis)adventure
« on: August 05, 2013, 07:48:39 AM »
Yesterday I brewed up a Northern English Brown and everything went very smoothly. Hit my mash temps on the nose, had great efficiency (for me) at 76%, and everything smelled great and looked good. Then it came to cooling...

After the boil I took the kettle down and turned on the hose for my immersion chiller and about a minute later I realized I had a leak where the vinyl tubing connected to the copper and the hose water was slowing draining into the wort. I quickly pulled it out, but I guesstimate somewhere between 2-4 oz's of water got in. The good news is that it is culinary water, but the bad news is I have no idea what may be growing on the inside of the hose. I ended up starting the bathwater and using my freezer ice to get it cooling, while I ran to 7-11 and picked up an ice block and another 20 lb's of ice. I was still able to get it down to 65 degrees in about 50 minutes, which is only about 15 minutes slower than my chiller, so no real harm done there. I just worry about possibly getting an infection, though I hope the fact that it was dripping into 200 degree wort will help a bit. If I would have been thinking better I would have just thrown it back on the kettle for 5 minutes to kill anything. Only downside I can see to that would be a slight change in my hop profile, but better than a ruinded batch. I guess I will know in a few weeks.

Just goes to show you need to plan for everything because nothing ever goes 100% smooth.

9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Is liquid yeast significantly better?
« on: August 01, 2013, 09:29:20 PM »
Well I guess the final conclusion is that I need to brew more beer and test. Thanks for the discussion.

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Northern English Brown Ale
« on: August 01, 2013, 07:42:44 AM »
I hear good things about brown malt but this is my first time using it. I think I may up it to 1 lb and cut the crystal to .5, while also increasing the Maris to 8.5 and eliminating the biscuit. Thanks for the feedback guys.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Northern English Brown Ale
« on: August 01, 2013, 06:13:01 AM »
Yeah, I think you guys aer right about the yeast. I will swap it out for 1098. Also if I get rid of the biscuit but add another .5 lb. of brown malt instead of more Maris would it be too overwhelming?

12
Beer Recipes / Northern English Brown Ale
« on: July 31, 2013, 04:01:36 PM »
I am looking to brew a brown ale this weekend and have come up with this. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

5 Gallon batch 6.5 gallon boil

8 lbs. Maris Otter
1 lb. Crystal 60
1 lb. Munich
.5 lb. Brown Malt
.5 lb. Biscuit
.25 lb. Chocolate

.5 oz. Northern Brewer @ 60
.5 oz. Fuggle @ 30
.5 oz. Fuggle @ 15
.5 oz. EKG @ 5

US-05 Yeast

Mash @ 152 for 60 min with 1.5 qts/lb.
70% effciency should give a OG of 1.057

13
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Is liquid yeast significantly better?
« on: July 31, 2013, 03:17:45 PM »
You can't tell south on IPA/stout/etc. but try brewing a mock lager or alt. you can brew a pretty convincing alt with wy1056, but us-05 just has that little touch of yeast bite that is not as clean.

That would make sense. I plan on brewing a brown ale this weekend and I'll probably give a dry yeast a shot.

14
Yeast and Fermentation / Is liquid yeast significantly better?
« on: July 31, 2013, 10:17:45 AM »
I have used liquid yeast exclusively since I began brewing, but as I talk to a couple other guys I know who brew great beer, I am starting to wonder if it is worth the extra $$ and hassle of making a starter. Often times I don't end up knowing I will brew until the day before or even the day of, so I end up buying 2 vials of yeast instead of making the starter, and I am sick of dropping $16.00 for my yeast.

For the styles I brew (IPA's, Brown Ale's, ESB's, PA's) am I gaining anything significant over using US-04 or US-05?

15
Beer Recipes / Re: Golden Ale Recipe
« on: July 19, 2013, 10:39:01 AM »
 [/quote]

BTW, there is a lot of important info missing from your water report.
[/quote]

Agreed.

Sulfate and Chloride is a prerequisite for good brewing water, especially the ratio of the two.
[/quote]

Well I guess I will look into it further to see if I can find the rest of the info.

On another note though, I decided to change up my planned recipe, and do a bit of a Dead Guy Ale clone I found on this site. What do you think?

8 lb. Maris Otter Pale 2row
1 lb. Munich
1 lb. Crystal 20
1 oz. Perle for 60
.5 oz. Saaz for 10
.5 oz Saaz for 1

Mash temp of 150 for 60 minutes.

Assuming I can get 70% effeciency I should have an OG of 1.051 and a FG of 1.010

Any suggestions on a good ale yeast for this?

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