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Messages - mr_jeffers

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Long Will My Smack Pack Last?
« on: November 13, 2011, 05:56:28 PM »
Thanks for helping me relax and not worry.  Think I'll have a homebrew before hitting the sack.

2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How Long Will My Smack Pack Last?
« on: November 13, 2011, 05:44:23 PM »
Should I stick it back in the fridge, or just leave it be on the counter?

3
Yeast and Fermentation / How Long Will My Smack Pack Last?
« on: November 13, 2011, 05:00:39 PM »
Evening fellow brewers,

Last night, in anticipation of a Sunday with nothing to do, I pulled my Wyeast 3278 Belgian Lambic Blend out of the fridge, and smacked the nutrient pack.  Quicker than I could say "Let's Brew This!" my Sunday seemed to fill up, and now I've got a fully swollen pack of yeast on my counter.  Unless I give up some precious sleep time I don't foresee anything making it into the carboy tonight.  Will my swollen pack of yeast still be okay tomorrow, or should I just suck it up and brew tonight? 

4
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Transfering from bottle to keg?
« on: September 26, 2011, 04:01:25 PM »
I did it with cheap commercial quarts to see how it works once. Probably will be some oxidation even if you purge. The funnel-tube sounds sketchy but who knows? Might work.

I imagine there's no way to do it without risking a little oxidation.  I figured a funnel & tube would allow me to transfer the beer quietly to the bottom of the keg, which may be better than slowly pouring it down the inside wall of the keg.  How well did it work with the cheap commercial quarts?

5
Kegging and Bottling / Transfering from bottle to keg?
« on: September 26, 2011, 01:57:01 PM »
Afternoon fellow homebrewers,

I've got two cases of barley wine, which didn't carbonate up.  It's been in the bottle for several months at room temp (65-70`) and there's a thin layer of yeast on the bottom.  I do get a little bit of a "ppfft" when I pop the top, but I'm thinking that between the high alcohol (10%) and the long secondary (I should have pitched some fresh yeast at bottling) it probably just isn't going to happen.  I am now happily kegging, and was wondering if there was a way to transfer the bottles to a keg and force carbonate without completely oxidizing the batch.  My thoughts were to purge a keg with co2, and then outfit a funnel with a tube that ran to the bottom of the keg.  I could then pour gently into the funnel.  I could even go one step further and attempt to blanket the funnel in co2, so that co2 might enter the bottle instead of oxygen.

So, what say you?  Anybody attempt this? What method did you use and how did it turn out?

Thanks for your input,
Jeff

6
Ingredients / Kegging With Homegrown Hops
« on: August 27, 2011, 04:17:55 AM »
'Tis the season, and I've got a healthy bine of Cascade and Chinook hops to pick from.  I've also got a rye pale ale I'll be kegging in a few days, and was thinking of trying to dry hop it in the keg.  I've got a few questions though.

1) From what I've read, the ratio of dry to wet hop weight is around 1oz dry = 4oz wet.  Sound about right?

2) Is it ok to put the cones in the hop sock whole, or will I get better results if I break them up a bit?  Any other suggestions for prepping the hops for their duty?


Thanks!
Jeff

7
Kegging and Bottling / Re: beer cases
« on: May 12, 2011, 01:59:01 PM »
They look killer.  Sturdy and completely waterproof.  Someday when I have extra money that isn't being spent on beer ingredients or beer equipment, maybe I'll buy some beer boxes.

8
Kegging and Bottling / Re: beer cases
« on: May 11, 2011, 01:38:52 PM »
I've been getting e-mails lately from these guys

http://www.cwcrate.com/

They look like pretty sturdy boxes, which would last quite a long time.  The only thing keeping me from taking the jump is the cost.

9
Homebrew Clubs / Re: Technical brewing education in brewing clubs
« on: February 04, 2011, 09:30:19 PM »
Sounds like a fun weekend Bruce.

I'm a member of the Southern Maine Homebrewers.  Some of our members have expressed an interest in discussing the more technical aspects of brewing at club meetings, so recently we've been trying to incorporate a short information session with each meeting. Somewhere in the 20-30 minute range, the topic can be about styles, techniques, etc.  November's meeting consisted of going over the style notes for Belgian Tripels, and sampling a couple commercial examples since there were no homebrewed versions available.

10
Other Fermentables / Re: Fixing a bland Cyser
« on: November 14, 2010, 06:55:52 PM »
Sorry about that.  I have a hard time putting descriptors to what I'm tasting, but I'll do my best.

It has a descent, non-assertive nose.  Slight honey/apple, with a hint of certain spice I can't quite put my finger on.

The mouthfeel is thin. Slightly tart with some astringency on the tongue.  No apple or honey flavor.  Would never guess it was a cyser.

11
Other Fermentables / Fixing a bland Cyser
« on: November 14, 2010, 05:40:31 PM »
Unfortunately, I can't find my notes.  What I do know is that it was a half batch of cyser, with brown sugar as well.  Fermented with WLP 775 English Cider Yeast.  I transferred it a few weeks ago into another carboy, and it was nice and dry with good flavor.  I pulled off a 375ml bottle for a friend last night, and found it to be rather bland.  There was more yeast sediment on the bottom of the carboy, so I'm assuming that whatever yeast was left in suspension chewed up whatever sugar was left and settled out.

Obviously I don't want to dump this.  There are no off flavors that I can detect, and the friend I gave to bottle too suggested a little malic acid to help with the flavor.  Looking for suggestions that other people have tried that turned around a batch that may have gone a little too far to the bland side.

My gut reaction it to stabilize with potassium sorbate, add a little concentrated apple juice get a little apple flavor back in there and balance it out with some acid blend.  What say you?

13
The Pub / Re: Name That Tune!
« on: September 12, 2010, 05:27:00 AM »
Maybe I'd sell you a chicken
wisd de poison interlaced wisd de meat.


Ween - "Buenas Tardes Amigo".  I've been a big Ween fan since high school.  I remember listening to Pure Guava and thinking that it was unlike anything I'd ever heard before.



"Well Rex was a Texan outta New Orleans and he traveled with the carnival show,
 ran th' bumper cars, sucked cheap cigars, and he candied up his nose"

Winona's Big Brown Beaver by Primus???

You sir, are correct!

14
The Pub / Re: Name That Tune!
« on: September 11, 2010, 03:41:18 PM »
Maybe I'd sell you a chicken
wisd de poison interlaced wisd de meat.


Ween - "Buenas Tardes Amigo".  I've been a big Ween fan since high school.  I remember listening to Pure Guava and thinking that it was unlike anything I'd ever heard before.



"Well Rex was a Texan outta New Orleans and he traveled with the carnival show,
 ran th' bumper cars, sucked cheap cigars, and he candied up his nose"

15
Equipment and Software / Re: Removing surface lead from brass
« on: August 30, 2010, 04:05:17 PM »
Nevermind, I put Google to work, and managed to find the answer I was looking for.  Here it is for anybody else who's interested.

http://brewingrabble.com/resources/surface-lead.htm

Removing surface lead from brass.

This is completely from John Palmer off the Realbeer website
(http://realbeer.com/jjpalmer/Welding.txt)

<start>"Brass is an alloy of Copper and Zinc with some lead thrown in for
machinability. The lead percentage varies, but for the common brass alloys
used in plumbing fittings it is 7% or less.  Lead is entirely soluble in
copper, but the presence of zinc changes this. In Brass, the lead exists as
minute globules. These globules act as an intrinsic lubricant during
machining. The result is a micro-thin film of lead being smeared over the
machined surface. It is this lead (a very small amount) that can be
dissolved off by the wort. While this small amount of lead should probably
not be a cause of concern, most people would be happier if it wasn't there
at all.

Well, never let it be said that the Space Program never yields technology
applicable to the home. Some chemists working on the International Space
Station Alpha program were consulted for an etchant that could safely remove
the lead from the surface of brass parts. The chemists determined that a
1-to-1 volume ratio of Glacial Acetic Acid (98% by vol.) to Hydrogen
Peroxide (30% by vol.) would accomplish this without pitting the brass. This
procedure was performed in the lab using the standard laboratory
concentrations of these chemicals. The process consisted of a 30 second
dunk, swirl and rinse at room temperature, and was successful in removing
the lead, as determined by a Lead Home Test Kit (swabs). In addition, the
procedure had the added benefit of turning the brass into Pure Gold. (Okay,
the color of, anyway.)

Because 98% Acetic Acid and 30% Hydrogen Peroxide are not available to the
average brewer, the experiment was repeated using the concentrations
available in the supermarket. These are 5% Acetic Acid (White Distilled
Vinegar) and 3% Hydrogen Peroxide. Due to the difference in concentration,
the relative concentration ratio is changed. For the household variety
concentrations, a 2-to-1 volume ratio of Acetic Acid to H2O2 is needed.

The process was expected to take longer with the more dilute solution, so
the brass part was immersed for 10 minutes. The results showed the same gold
color and the Lead Test swab indicated the lead had been removed. The
buttery yellow gold color can be used as an indicator that the process has
completed.  Home Lead Test kits should be available at most hardware stores.

This procedure for removing surface lead from brass can easily be conducted
at home. A 10-15 minute dunk, swirl, and rinse in a 2/1 volume ratio of 5%
Acetic Acid and 3% Hydrogen Peroxide has been shown to be effective. By the
way, the solution can be irritating to the skin so either wear gloves or use
tongs."<end>
____________________________________________

John Palmer also addresses this in his "How to Brew" on-line book
(www.howtobrew.com) in Appendix B under cleaning copper.

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