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Messages - brewsumore

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1
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Ethyl acetate or fusels?
« on: March 25, 2017, 02:31:15 PM »
Yep, it's usually fusels due to too hot a pitch and/or ferment temp, especially within the first 0 - 48 hrs, and for many beginners might also involve poor yeast health from pitching less than the recommendable amount of yeast.  Some additional band-aid flavors can come from chlorine or chloramines in your tap water if brewing with that, which is simple to remove via one crushed campden tablet per 20 gal water, stirred in prior to heating the water.

2
All Grain Brewing / Re: Traquair House Clone boil down process
« on: March 25, 2017, 02:15:38 PM »
I boil down 2 gallons of first runnings down to about a quart - a nice thick brown syrup.  The best way is to get a much deeper (read that as "BIG") pot than you think you'll need, since as the wort boils it foams quite a bit, and gets slower and slower to reduce as time goes by.  In my experiences it takes longer than 90 minutes to get it boiled down enough to create the caramelized syrup that, once re-added to the boil, will provide the brewer with the great signature flavor you should be (IMHO) looking for.

I run off the mash into the syrup pot and the rest, plus the sparge, into the kettle, and actually start boiling the syrup for 1/2 hour before even beginning the kettle boil.  For me that works about right, although even this way I've gone a good 2-hour boil total for the full volume boil.

Good luck.  It's worth it - a great beer.

Sorry, a gallon or so of wort is correct for 5 gal of beer.  I forgot that for me I boil down 2.2 gal of first runnings wort for 10 gal of beer.  So your reduction boil time would be different than mine.

Also, I brew outside and so set up a separate propane burner in the same brew area to make the syrup, so I can keep a close eye on it.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: Traquair House Clone boil down process
« on: March 25, 2017, 02:12:09 PM »
I boil down 2 gallons of first runnings down to about a quart - a nice thick brown syrup.  The best way is to get a much deeper (read that as "BIG") pot than you think you'll need, since as the wort boils it foams quite a bit, and gets slower and slower to reduce as time goes by.  In my experiences it takes longer than 90 minutes to get it boiled down enough to create the caramelized syrup that, once re-added to the boil, will provide the brewer with the great signature flavor you should be (IMHO) looking for.

I run off the mash into the syrup pot and the rest, plus the sparge, into the kettle, and actually start boiling the syrup for 1/2 hour before even beginning the kettle boil.  For me that works about right, although even this way I've gone a good 2-hour boil total for the full volume boil.

Good luck.  It's worth it - a great beer.

4
That's looking really great.  Well done!

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: March 23, 2017, 12:07:53 PM »
Saturday:

"Far Far Away" Pale Ale

94% 2row
6% carared

magnum for bittering
rest Galaxy

Are you going for a Chewie texture?   ;D

haha - another name I was thinking was "These Aren't the Hops You're Looking For" lol

Made using a droid brewing app.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: March 23, 2017, 12:03:00 PM »
Saturday:

"Far Far Away" Pale Ale

94% 2row
6% carared

magnum for bittering
rest Galaxy

Are you going for a Chewie texture?   ;D

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Batch sparge efficiency
« on: March 19, 2017, 05:45:53 PM »
Also helpful:


Mash at lower end of mash temp range and at least full 60 minutes
Sparge temp (grist + sparge water} = 166 - 169F
Stir well the sparge (before vorlauf/runoff) for at least 4 minutes
if doing single mash and sparge, shoot for mash grain ratio of 1.6 - 1.7 quarts water per lbs grain, and remaining needed water volume in the sparge.

For me (cheap n.easy batch sparge) for a 1.072 beer my brewhouse effciency is around 72 -73%.  That includes a good crush and water manipulation.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Celleraring vs storage
« on: March 19, 2017, 05:05:32 PM »
I believe the recommended temp for cellaring (not refrigerating) beer is 50 - 55F.  I converted a basement room into a wine/beer cellar and keep it at 51F in cold winter, 57F in hot summer, and 55F the rest of the time and it cellars beer just fine.  I also make wine.

That said, AFAIK most beers suitable for cellaring are +6% ABV, give or take.  I also recommend oxygen scavaging caps for cellared beers.

9
Ingredients / Re: Hop Suggestions for an Over-the-Top, Citrusy IPA
« on: March 16, 2017, 11:48:33 PM »
Thanks good to know. Maybe in a Saison


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk



I will say as a Lemon Drop fan that it's one of the hops in Stone Delicious IPA, along with El Dorado. That beer isn't exactly a lemon meringue pie, it's tasty IMO. I like it with hops like Amarillo, Citra, and others. Each his own. As for it in a saison, it's very good - I'm using some more in a saison soon.


I don't mean to cast a negative spin - in my limited experience it's just not to my palate.  And oddly enough, it was worse when it was super fresh, and again six months after kegging.  In the middle 6 months I enjoyed it.  Weird, right?

10
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Best filling volume for keg
« on: March 16, 2017, 11:41:59 PM »
To prevent fear of beer going up the gas line, I fill to just beneath the gas poppet diptube.

11
All Grain Brewing / Re: How many here would buy a Grainfather???
« on: March 16, 2017, 09:49:28 PM »
Too "hands off" for me. I enjoy brewing more than drinking and I like to have my hands in every aspect. This seems to me to be more of a coffee pot. Put your grounds in, add water and turn it on. Plus, more than brewing, I enjoy building 90% of my equipment.

I get this.  Although my base approach and technique have always followed Denny's cheap n' easy set-up and process, my unique modifications and tools and improvisations, and built-by-me equipment come together to satisfy my creative side to hit numbers, make better and better beers, and feel like I'm not following the same manual as the thousands of people who buy a designed and mass-produced system with parts that may or may not limit what I can brew in at least a full 5-gal batch.  That said, many designed systems make me drool, and the efficiencies and control they offer definitely provide a greater range of control than I have with my system.

I definitely would consider a Grainfather if I didn't have ample room to store multiple propane burners, keggles, picnic cooler mash/lautertuns, yadda-yadda-yadda.  Gee, I'm a lucky, if somewhat frugal and engineering-deficit guy!

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Testing....1,2,3...
« on: March 16, 2017, 09:27:20 PM »

Weazletoe makes such nice toys, er, I mean brewing equipment.  I still remember your old basement hood exhaust photos long time ago.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Matured Beers
« on: March 16, 2017, 09:21:23 PM »
So truly... "It depends" :P

Thanks guys!

It's up to you...when it tastes good, it's ready to drink!

This.  Also, I typically wait at least 2 weeks after kegging for my IPAs/PAs, to come together.

14
Ingredients / Re: Hop Suggestions for an Over-the-Top, Citrusy IPA
« on: March 15, 2017, 01:07:49 PM »
I like to bitter w Nugget.  Then 5 min w Citra and Columbus. I finish w Amarillo and Cascade in whirlpool and also for the dryhop. I'd also add 4-5% sugar to get it to finish dry.
I've not used Ekuanot, Idaho 7, Lemon Drop, and other new hop varieties. Too many in the freezer already.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I found lemon drop to impart a flavor somewhat like the lemon custard in lemon meringue pie, and it dominated and clashed with the other hop flavors when I made an IPA also with Columbus, centennial, amarillo, cascade and simcoe.  YMMV

15
Ingredients / Re: Hop Suggestions for an Over-the-Top, Citrusy IPA
« on: March 14, 2017, 10:27:31 PM »
Galaxy, Citra, Mosaic, and Azzaca in a late hopping schedule make for a serious juice bomb. I used them in an APA together last summer that included the Vermont Ale/Conan yeast strain. The Pale Ale served as a yeast starter of sorts for a bigger DIPA and I preferred the Pale after all was said and done.

I have also had a great, juicy IPA with El Dorado, Amarillo, and Citra. Cashmere and Lemon Drop would also be interesting options if you wanted to push more into the lemon-lime citrus territory.

Hmmm, interesting combos.  I might have to try something on that order - either of the combos you mentioned. 

FWIW, I found out that my tastebuds are not suited to lemon drop, which I've only used in combo with other hops.

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