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Messages - kmccaf

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1
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Sierra Nevada HopHunter
« on: March 02, 2015, 07:04:57 PM »
Found this at the grocery store today, and got a sixer. Whoa. It is very good. I really like the spice notes I am getting in the finish.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: mandarina
« on: March 02, 2015, 07:00:02 PM »
I should find my recipe that used Mandarina because it was very tasty. 10 gallons. I want to say it was 65% Best Pils 35% Triticale. 4 Ozs of Mandarina in the last 15 min, and 3 oz of Sterling as well. Half was fermented with saison yeast, and the other half got Bells house yeast. The saison was one of the best brew I have ever made. The apa was just ok until I let it sit in the fridge for a month. Something happened that rounded it out very nicely. Hop character was very lovely.

3
The Pub / Re: With German pils, must have food to pair
« on: March 01, 2015, 07:44:37 PM »

I bet that bier is suffig. Hey did you know pumpernickel means "devil's farts"?


I had never seen that, and in German devil = Teufel, so the Nick/nickel thing is new to me, but it might be a German idiom that I am not familiar with. The Young's old Nick with the devil on it is familiar to me, but that was a Brititsh beer.
I found this:
"The true origin of "pumpernickel" is nearly as strange, if somewhat less savory. "Pumpern" was a New High German word similar in meaning to the English "fart" (so chosen because, like the word "achoo," it imitated the sound it described), and "Nickel" was a form of the name Nicholas, an appellation commonly associated with a goblin or devil (e.g., "Old Nick" is a familiar name for Satan). Hence, pumpernickel is the "devil's fart," allegedly a reference to the bread's indigestible qualities and hence the effect it produced on those who consumed it."


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St. Nicholas is the bringer of gifts, and gifts are exchanged on Dec. 6th in Germany. Not a devil by any means. Now the Krampus is another thing all together, on Dec. 5th.

Most references to Old Nick that I can find say it is old English for the devil. How it got to Germany is something I don't know.
Old English and German are quite close. It was probably the other way around in that the folklore probably moved from Northern Europe to England (think Beowolf). Modern German is related very closely to old English, both Anglo-saxon in origen. Modern English is mostly Anglo Saxon with a strong french influence starting in 1066. If you read an old english version of something familiar, like The Lord's Prayer, it sounds a bit German. If you read Middle English like Chaucer (1300's), it sounds a bit French ("whan that Aprille with his shoure's  sote...) , then once you get to Shakespeare (1600) it sounds, well English.

Modern English is a Germanic language that has little resblance to German.
I think there is quite a bit of resemblance. Much of the vocabulary is close, maybe 60 percent of the same origins but different pronunciations of various vowels, shifts from v to w and p to f etc. mostly there is a more direct grammar than the latin derived languages.
My old medieval lit teacher could go on and on about how William the Conqueror ruined the English language, and Frenched it all up.

4
Yes I find this subject of some interest. Especially on a sour Braggot. Anyone got any experience with these?


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I haven't used braggot level of honey in a sour, but I've gone up to 20% of the fermentables. I am a fan of what the Brett and bugs do to the honey. Adds some interesting notes. I did just blend a braggot with a sour in the keg, and am looking forward to that. I have used Brett in a braggot, but I don't think I let it age long enough.

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brew Weekend 2/28
« on: February 28, 2015, 05:27:42 PM »
No brewing, but I kegged a ton. Made some odd mixtures in the keg that tasted pretty dang good as I tried to get the proportions right. Mixed a sour pumpkin ale with a rye porter, and a touch of oud bruin. Saison braggot got mixed with a very oaky Flanders and some oud bruin, as well as a very hoppy saison. Did a straight five gallons of oud bruin that was aged with gooseberries. Last keg was filled with a German red IPA.

6
All Things Food / Re: For the cool-climate gardeners
« on: February 25, 2015, 09:39:44 AM »



 I have a nice big palate to paint on now.

Excited to hear about your place - there really is nothing like having some land to work.
My garden changes every year.

Cheers to seed catalog/website dreaming. 8)

Indeed! I will start a thread on the farm come spring. I think some here would be interested in the progression of starting up a hop farm. Guess I need to learn how to post pictures.

7
The Pub / Re: Lots Of New Hops Farms
« on: February 25, 2015, 07:14:54 AM »
Great article. I really need to name my farm.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: mandarina
« on: February 23, 2015, 07:54:32 PM »

Beyond the ipa/pale styles for this hop, where to go.  I keep having Saison pop in my head.  Am I crazy on this?  I'm going to order some hops tomorrow and I think I will pick up some.  By the prices you can tell it is popular.
My saison goes in The keg this week and will get some dry hop with mandarina.


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I used it in a saison, and it was incredible. I think you will be very happy with it.

9
All Things Food / Re: For the cool-climate gardeners
« on: February 22, 2015, 12:14:37 PM »
Thanks Eric, I'll check them out. We're actually getting out our garden map and ordering seeds and onion plants today. I also like to try out hard to get varieties. We get most of our stuff from Johnny's Seeds in Maine. We're also members of the Northeast Organic Farmer's Association so we are able to buy all of our supplies and amendments in bulk as well as some cool varieties of potatoes. I can't wait to get out there but right now I can walk over my garden fence on top of the snow. Somewhere under there we have over wintered parsnips. I am shoveling off the cold frame today. Can you tell from the length of this post that I'm itching to get out there?

+1 on Johnny's Seeds. Good people, and great selection. I was just browsing their catalog this morning. I am starting to go a little crazy thinking about planting this year. I have a nice big palate to paint on now.

10
Ingredients / Re: Michigan Hops Farms Expanding.
« on: February 19, 2015, 12:29:00 PM »
Looking good, Michigan. I have really enjoyed the beers that have been made with Michigan hops. My wife and I bought a farm a month ago, and are looking to plant hops next year. Lots of research to do still.

11
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: February 19, 2015, 08:10:08 AM »
Had my well tested out at the new place. Here it is for Champaign IL:

pH 7.8

Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 362
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.60
Cations / Anions, me/L 6.7 / 7.0
ppm
Sodium, Na 66
Potassium, K 1
Calcium, Ca 39
Magnesium, Mg 22
Total Hardness, CaCO3 189
Nitrate, NO3-N 0.2 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S < 1
Chloride, Cl < 1
Carbonate, CO3 < 1.0
Bicarbonate, HCO3 424
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 350
Total Phosphorus, P 0.03
Total Iron, Fe 0.25

"<" - Not Detected / Below Detection Limit
That is pretty poor for brewing. Congratulations, it is even worse than mine.

Indeed! I am going to get RO installed. I knew it was not going to be good before we moved in.

12
Ingredients / Re: Post your water report
« on: February 19, 2015, 08:03:12 AM »
Had my well tested out at the new place. Here it is for Champaign IL:

pH 7.8

Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) Est, ppm 362
Electrical Conductivity, mmho/cm 0.60
Cations / Anions, me/L 6.7 / 7.0
ppm
Sodium, Na 66
Potassium, K 1
Calcium, Ca 39
Magnesium, Mg 22
Total Hardness, CaCO3 189
Nitrate, NO3-N 0.2 (SAFE)
Sulfate, SO4-S < 1
Chloride, Cl < 1
Carbonate, CO3 < 1.0
Bicarbonate, HCO3 424
Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 350
Total Phosphorus, P 0.03
Total Iron, Fe 0.25

"<" - Not Detected / Below Detection Limit

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Wedding beer names
« on: February 17, 2015, 05:01:33 PM »
From the proof of our food and beer menu, ours were as follows:




Except that the 10pm saison tapping was changed from the peach/ginger thing to a beer called "Dupont". It was just the base beer from all the other saisons since the peach/ginger thing tasted weird in bench trials. The drunk people never noticed.

We didn't feel the need to make corny names. If they related to the wedding, great. If not, we didn't care.

PS - one of our groomsmen did actually wear a kilt.

Dunkel Do Balls is great! I will be using that. Nice looking menu.

My wedding beers were called "Karen the Red" and "Kyle the Blonde". I spent a loooong time trying to get the red ale to match my wife's hair. I also made a mead. Nothing fancy.

14
Ingredients / Re: Peppercorns of different varieties
« on: February 13, 2015, 03:20:53 PM »
I'll throw this out there. The people who run the Spice House in Chicago and Milwaukee once told me that there is no difference between Black, Green, Pink, and White peppercorns. They gave a talk on the history of the spice trade that involved people who made more money off the ones that looked different than black, but said that they are not actually different. The only one that tastes and is different is Szechuan.

From my understanding pink peppercorns are from a differently species.  And Black, green and white peppercorns are from the same plant, but are different in the maturity and/or processing.

That may be true. The presentation was 4 or 5 years ago. I should really look into it since I've been repeating this ever since.

15
Ingredients / Re: Peppercorns of different varieties
« on: February 13, 2015, 07:23:47 AM »
I'll throw this out there. The people who run the Spice House in Chicago and Milwaukee once told me that there is no difference between Black, Green, Pink, and White peppercorns. They gave a talk on the history of the spice trade that involved people who made more money off the ones that looked different than black, but said that they are not actually different. The only one that tastes and is different is Szechuan.

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