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Messages - Pawtucket Patriot

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31
Going Pro / Trench Drain Plan
« on: October 16, 2013, 08:23:07 AM »
Hey guys,

We're working with our architect on our production-area floor-plan right now.  We've got a lot of things figured out, but we're still trying to sort out a trench drain plan.  I've got some ideas, and I've done a lot of research, but there doesn't seem to be any rule of thumb for this.

For you guys who are currently in production, do you have any suggestions?  Anything you'd do differently in hindsight?  I'm posting a drawing of our proposed production floor-plan so you can get an idea of the layout.  I'm also posting my ideas for trench drains.  You'll notice that I'm thinking of doing a round drain in the brewhouse area.

Cheers!

Matt




32
Going Pro / Re: Kegs
« on: October 09, 2013, 07:11:52 AM »
What's a good price for new kegs?  This seems reasonable but not great, though I have no reference point.  Plus, these are Chinese made but it seems like one of the more reputable companies.

http://discussions.probrewer.com/showthread.php?33055-New-kegs-arrive-check-our-price-for-1-2-1-6-bbl-and-50L-kegs-with-Micro-Matic-valve

The range for German- or American-made 1/2BBL kegs that I've seen is between $130-$160.

33
Going Pro / Re: Kegs
« on: October 09, 2013, 05:48:18 AM »
Is Micro star the one who doesn't allow you to have any of your own kegs?

Might be.  The guys who started Keg Logistics were previously with Microstar and left to start their own thing.  From what I've heard, Keg Logistics is much more flexible.

34
Going Pro / Re: Kegs
« on: October 08, 2013, 09:34:51 AM »
We'll be going through Keg Logistics for our kegs. 

35
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 08, 2013, 09:33:34 AM »
Hey Leos,

Actually, the TTB passed a temporary rule at the end of 2012 (which is still in effect), that reduces the bond amount for small brewers to $1,000 so long as the small brewer pays less than $50k in excise taxes in a given year.  Because the federal excise tax rate is $7 on the first 60k barrels, that $50k in taxes is equal to producing approximately 7,142 barrels per year.  We are estimating that we will produce fewer than 7,142 barrels per year for the first several years, so our initial bond rate should be $1,000.
See I should have you on retainer for any advice.
Thank you for the info.
I was starting to worry that I will have to Increase the bond to $2000.

 ;D  No problem!

This was a temporary rule? I thought is was that way always. Never the less I appreciated the rule.

Yep.  It's a temporary rule that is in effect for a period of three years.  Hopefully, they'll make it permanent after the three-year period lapses.

http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-07/pdf/2012-29488.pdf

36
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 08, 2013, 06:46:30 AM »
Hey Leos,

Actually, the TTB passed a temporary rule at the end of 2012 (which is still in effect), that reduces the bond amount for small brewers to $1,000 so long as the small brewer pays less than $50k in excise taxes in a given year.  Because the federal excise tax rate is $7 on the first 60k barrels, that $50k in taxes is equal to producing approximately 7,142 barrels per year.  We are estimating that we will produce fewer than 7,142 barrels per year for the first several years, so our initial bond rate should be $1,000.
See I should have you on retainer for any advice.
Thank you for the info.
I was starting to worry that I will have to Increase the bond to $2000.

 ;D  No problem!

37
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 08, 2013, 04:47:56 AM »
Hey Leos,

Actually, the TTB passed a temporary rule at the end of 2012 (which is still in effect), that reduces the bond amount for small brewers to $1,000 so long as the small brewer pays less than $50k in excise taxes in a given year.  Because the federal excise tax rate is $7 on the first 60k barrels, that $50k in taxes is equal to producing approximately 7,142 barrels per year.  We are estimating that we will produce fewer than 7,142 barrels per year for the first several years, so our initial bond rate should be $1,000.

38
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 07, 2013, 09:27:50 AM »
Pawtucket Patriot,
Check with you insurance agent about getting a brewers bond. That's what we did, we needed one for the Feds and one for the State. "Should be easy" to increase the bond when you need to, we have not had to do that, so take "Should be easy" with a grain of salt.

Thanks for the suggestion!  I'll definitely look into that.

39
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 06, 2013, 02:59:00 PM »
The TTB fraud prevention agent I spoke with a few weeks ago told me that COLAs are only necessary when a brewery is distributing outside of its home state.  I can't think of any harm from filing for a COLA even if a brewery is only distributing in its home state.  And, if you plan on distributing to other states in the future, it will save a step down the road.

40
Interesting piece. I had no idea Lagunitas took that long to become fully profitable.

http://priceonomics.com/the-craft-beer-movement/

Maybe "revenue positive," as used in the article has a special meaning in the accounting world (which is not my bailiwick), but it's hard to understand what the author means.  If Lagunitas sold one beer it would technically have positive revenue because revenue = $$ from sales.  Also, profitability is different than having positive cash flow.  It sounds like Lagunitas may have taken losses over a long period of time due to constant expansion and purchasing a lot of new equipment.  But this doesn't mean the owners weren't making money.  No business should take almost 20 years to reach "profitability" in the sense that the owners are actually making money. 

41
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 04, 2013, 12:25:10 PM »

42
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 04, 2013, 10:42:37 AM »
Ron, we were hoping to submit the app this week.  We're just going to post a collateral bond for $1,000.  It just seems so much easier than going through a bonding company.

43
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 04, 2013, 07:09:17 AM »
The wait for an ok to do a beer label is what caught my attention. I'm not convinced that we really need DC bureaucrats to survive that decision.

Only if the beer is going to cross state lines. Blame the founding fathers for that one.

So how does that work?  I remember reading on probrewer that someone wanted to get a kind of generic keg/tap label approved for their brewpub so they could do new styles more quickly, but it was denied.  Do you only need TTB approval if you're selling out of state?

Right, you only need to go through the federal labeling approval process (COLA) if you are selling beer out of state.  Unless beer is being sold in interstate commerce, the feds have no authority to regulate it.  Thanks to the 21st Amendment, the individual states retain exclusive control over alcohol regulation if the alcohol stays within their borders.

Though some states still require COLAs even within state borders.

True, and most states have their own unique labeling approval requirements.  E.g, Minnesota requires us to file brand registrations for each brand @ $40 a pop.

44
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 04, 2013, 05:05:42 AM »
The wait for an ok to do a beer label is what caught my attention. I'm not convinced that we really need DC bureaucrats to survive that decision.

Only if the beer is going to cross state lines. Blame the founding fathers for that one.

So how does that work?  I remember reading on probrewer that someone wanted to get a kind of generic keg/tap label approved for their brewpub so they could do new styles more quickly, but it was denied.  Do you only need TTB approval if you're selling out of state?

Right, you only need to go through the federal labeling approval process (COLA) if you are selling beer out of state.  Unless beer is being sold in interstate commerce, the feds have no authority to regulate it.  Thanks to the 21st Amendment, the individual states retain exclusive control over alcohol regulation if the alcohol stays within their borders.

45
Going Pro / Re: So you want to be a brewer
« on: October 03, 2013, 05:48:39 PM »
Have you got your brewery permits? Opening when?

Looking at an early spring opening. Right now we're waiting on our SBA loan approval - or rather we were. :-\

Sean, I feel for ya man.  We're on a similar timeline as far as opening.  I was telling my wife the other day how lucky we are that we started the SBA application process when we did.  We were approved in mid-September and closed on our loan shortly afterward.  At least we were able to order our equipment with the proceeds.  But we still need to get our Brewer's Notice application in.  It's all ready to go, but there's no one to process.   :'(

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