Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Brewtopalonian

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 9
16
Ingredients / Re: sparge water pH
« on: March 12, 2019, 05:02:38 PM »
Ideally, you want to match the pH of your mash, but if you just want a consistent acid addition, shoot for 5.5.  We acidify the sparge water to prevent tannin extraction during the sparge.  If you want to increase your efficiency, I might recommend switching to a fly sparge technique. 

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

17
Other Fermentables / Re: Fermentation length?
« on: March 09, 2019, 02:05:09 PM »
Awesome, all great advice thanks guys.  I did a wine a few months ago and that fermented to completion in about the same time as my beers.  This just gave me pause to see it still going.  I will be patient.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


18
Other Fermentables / Re: Fermentation length?
« on: March 09, 2019, 07:11:53 AM »
Okay, so I thought I would Branch out and try to make some Mead.  I used the no heat method as I was once apiarist and understand that honey is naturally antimicrobial.  However, I pitched B71 into my first batch with 3lbs of honey for 1 gallon of water, aerated well.  3 weeks later I'm still at about 1 bubble every 7 seconds.  Should I be concerned that this is just turning into some fancy honey vinegar, or is this a longer fermentation.  It's been consistently at 68*F since pitching.  I also have another Mead started a week later that is still fermenting at about 1 bubble every 3 seconds using Wyeast 1388 Belgian strong as an experiment.

I'd love to hear from some professional and amateur Mead makers on what you have experienced in the past.  As a Beer brewer I have exactly no experience with Mead and  used to a quick primary fermentation (4-6 days).

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
Did you rehydrate the yeast using Goferm?

Have you added nutrients in a timed additions over several days.
I added nutrients at the beginning but not since. Yes, rehydrated the yeast.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


19
Other Fermentables / Fermentation length?
« on: March 09, 2019, 12:16:42 AM »
Okay, so I thought I would Branch out and try to make some Mead.  I used the no heat method as I was once apiarist and understand that honey is naturally antimicrobial.  However, I pitched B71 into my first batch with 3lbs of honey for 1 gallon of water, aerated well.  3 weeks later I'm still at about 1 bubble every 7 seconds.  Should I be concerned that this is just turning into some fancy honey vinegar, or is this a longer fermentation.  It's been consistently at 68*F since pitching.  I also have another Mead started a week later that is still fermenting at about 1 bubble every 3 seconds using Wyeast 1388 Belgian strong as an experiment.

I'd love to hear from some professional and amateur Mead makers on what you have experienced in the past.  As a Beer brewer I have exactly no experience with Mead and  used to a quick primary fermentation (4-6 days).

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


20
Equipment and Software / Re: electric brewing systems
« on: March 08, 2019, 06:43:05 PM »
The Brew Easy system from Blichmann is really good and easy to use.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


21
All Grain Brewing / Re: Help with Apple-like off-flavor
« on: March 06, 2019, 04:01:13 PM »
I *think* though I'm not positive and couldn't be without some experimentation myself, that you have a pitching issue.  At the Homebrew supply shop I work at, we usually recommend using 2 smack packs for a 5 gallon batch, creating a starter, or buy Imperial yeast in the same strand (though not all are available).  That's where I would start honestly. 

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

But he indicated that he made a starter...and calculated the pitch rate already.
So he did... Brain got ahead of my eyes.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


22
Equipment and Software / Re: Grain Bins
« on: March 06, 2019, 03:52:55 PM »
Yes, I would second this!  This is a good technique! Roll the tops of the bags down and press out as much air as possible then tape the tops shut, then lid.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


23
All Grain Brewing / Re: Help with Apple-like off-flavor
« on: March 06, 2019, 03:37:21 PM »
I *think* though I'm not positive and couldn't be without some experimentation myself, that you have a pitching issue.  At the Homebrew supply shop I work at, we usually recommend using 2 smack packs for a 5 gallon batch, creating a starter, or buy Imperial yeast in the same strand (though not all are available).  That's where I would start honestly. 

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


24
Equipment and Software / Re: Grain Bins
« on: March 06, 2019, 03:23:27 PM »
For my base malts I like these: IRIS Airtight Pet Food Container, 50-Pound, Clear/Black https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B006JRRRQI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_uu-FCbVXYFN14

For adjuncts/specialties I like these: Bergan Stack-N-Stor 40 Stackable Storage https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00004X14K/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_cw-FCbT2V1179

Most importantly is that they have a lid to prevent rodents and to keep moisture out.  Depending on where you live you may want to get a dehumidifier for the grain storage room. I live in Utah and don't have problems with moisture because, well, desert.  Good luck!  Hope it works out for you!

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


25
Ingredients / Re: Water Profile: Stout (Steeped Roasted Malts)
« on: January 16, 2019, 04:00:36 PM »
Robert, Goose,  Thank you very much!  I input the grain bill with the roasted grains and then made the selection at the bottom of the grain input to remove roast from the main mash.  I guess I will add salts to boil for flavor.

26
Ingredients / Re: Water Profile: Stout (Steeped Roasted Malts)
« on: January 16, 2019, 03:06:01 PM »
The enzymes that turn starches to sugar in the mash work best in the pH 5.2 - 5.6 range, so you need to have the mash pH correct or you may suffer from poor efficiency. Steeped roasted grains are usually added at the end of the mash, when their acid contribution is too late to have any effect.

Thanks, that kind of steers me in the right direction.  I guess I won't add any alkaline to my mash profile.

27
Ingredients / Water Profile: Stout (Steeped Roasted Malts)
« on: January 16, 2019, 03:53:13 AM »
Hello All!

I'm brewing an Irish Stout tomorrow (not dry, just a nice rounded stout).  I'm currently steeping my roasted malts in room temp RO water.  I'm using Martin's Bru'n Water and trying to come up with a good water solution for this recipe.  I would like to have some RA in the final beer in order to improve body.  If I use the mash profile's provided by Martin for either a Black Full or Dublin, my pH is rather high (5.83) after making the adjustments.  I don't want to add acid and alkalinity.  Should I not worry about the mash pH being that high because the roasted malts are going to add acid to the overall beer?

Here's the recipe:

8.75lb Golden Promise
.5lb Flaked Barley
.5lb Chocolate Malt (250SRM) <--- cold steep
.5lb Roasted Barley (695SRM) <--- cold steep
.25lb Crystal Medium (77SRM)

Thanks for the feed back, hope you all are enjoying a cold one!

28
All Grain Brewing / Re: Increasing body in stout recipie
« on: January 04, 2019, 04:14:14 AM »
Another question.  What were your OG and FG numbers?  If it attenuated way down, that could also give the perception of being thin.

OG = 1.070
FG = 1.022
Man, that should have tons of body to it! Bordering on cloying.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

^^^Exactly what I was thinking. Respectfully, another possible reason for why you think the body is thin: your palate. The beer's numbers and ingredients suggest that it should be full of body and fullness, provided the carbonation is reasonable. Did you get a second and third opinion on the beer? Based on the recipe, there's not much more you can do to increase the body. You could add a little wheat malt, but if you didn't get body from the recipe in its current form, you likely won't detect any more body from adding wheat.

Yes, I have had three other friends of mine try this with a similar response, descriptions included thin and almost watery.
That's crazy man, the only thing I can think of is carbonation or water profile.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


29
All Grain Brewing / Re: Increasing body in stout recipie
« on: January 04, 2019, 03:06:00 AM »
Another question.  What were your OG and FG numbers?  If it attenuated way down, that could also give the perception of being thin.

OG = 1.070
FG = 1.022
Man, that should have tons of body to it! Bordering on cloying.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

I agree, body should be better than it is currently being perceived, that is why I asked the question. Something just doesn't seem right.

Also, this was bottle conditioned. Unfortunately, I have yet to switch to kegging.....hopefully this year......
Are you still use the tried and true 1oz. Dextrose per gallon?  That will give a higher carbonation profile than you would typically want in a stout.  Ideally, serve this in a keg on nitro.  I've noticed a big difference since switching to beer gas.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


30
All Grain Brewing / Re: Increasing body in stout recipie
« on: January 04, 2019, 02:53:38 AM »
Another question.  What were your OG and FG numbers?  If it attenuated way down, that could also give the perception of being thin.

OG = 1.070
FG = 1.022
Man, that should have tons of body to it! Bordering on cloying.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 9