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Messages - gymrat

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781
Beer Recipes / Re: Modification question
« on: December 05, 2011, 07:20:05 PM »
For a no-sparge, you can get a really accurate estimate of the pre-boil gravity as long as you assume 100% conversion efficiency. Given that, the only factor that impacts SG is the liquor-to-grist ratio. Kai has a chart here: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Troubleshooting_Brewhouse_Efficiency#Determining_Conversion_Efficiency

Since you want to dilute to 5 gal at 1.050, you need to collect 3 gal at 1.085. Checking the chart, you can see that requires a mash ratio of 1.44 qt/lb. Assuming 0.12 gal/lb absorption and no dead space, x is the grain weight in pounds:

3 + 0.12x = (1.44/4)x; x = 12.5 lb

Ah ok. So I need around 3.5 pounds of base malt. Either go buy some 2 row or use some of my wheat.

782
Beer Recipes / Re: Modification question
« on: December 05, 2011, 04:58:00 PM »
Preboil and thankyou.

783
Beer Recipes / Re: Modification question
« on: December 05, 2011, 03:26:11 PM »
Total will be 5 gallons. I intend to make up the difference with water. So I thought I would make a concentrate of sorts.

784
Beer Recipes / Modification question
« on: December 05, 2011, 01:25:37 PM »
My next brew is going to be my favorite Red Ale recipe.

9 lbs 2 row barley
12 oz Caramel 40
4 oz Special B
4 oz Roasted Barley
1 oz Cascade Hops
3 oz UK Fuggle hops
Safale US_05

I am thinking about moving my operation to the kitchen for the winter. Maximum boil on my stove would be 3 gallons and that is pushing it. So I am thinking about just boiling my first runnings. I thought I could compensate by adding more grain. Ideally that would be more 2 row barley but I have about 40 pounds of malted wheat collecting dust. So I thought I might use a pound or two of that instead. I am not sure what this will do to the recipe but I bet it will still taste good.

My question is, giving I usually get 75% efficiency doing a batch sparge from my system, how much wheat would I want to add to this recipe to hit an OG of around 1.050?


785
The Pub / Re: Lost another friend yesterday
« on: November 21, 2011, 01:15:01 PM »
I am truly sorry for your loss. How old was she?

786
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What makes a beer "Imperial"
« on: November 16, 2011, 09:37:01 PM »
Hoppy not holly. Damn I hate auto correct.

787
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What makes a beer "Imperial"
« on: November 16, 2011, 09:35:16 PM »
From what I've read/researched, if we're talking IPA's an American IPA's gonna be way more bitter.  It's generally a higher hopped IPA.  Imperial is that higher hopped but also has a higher alcohol content and malt which balances it better.  That's why people who don't like American might like Imperials.

Original topic was imperials not IPAs. Imperials were not holly beers. Originally they were a stout with amped up ABV brewed especially for the Russian hierchy. Again look at what I copied and pasted from Wikipedia. Now imperial is a marketing term usually just meaning the beer is high ABV for the style.

788
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What makes a beer "Imperial"
« on: November 16, 2011, 07:58:15 PM »
Imperial stout was not hopped up. It was not designed for long voyages on the sea like IPAs. It was hopped up in alcohol to ne worthy of the Russian heads of state. That is where the term "imperial" came from. Now it is just a marketing term.

789
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What makes a beer "Imperial"
« on: November 16, 2011, 07:53:27 PM »
Where imperial came from out of Wikipedia

 Imperial stout

Imperial stout, also known as "Russian imperial stout" or "imperial Russian stout," is a strong dark beer or stout in the style that was brewed in the 18th century by Thrale's brewery in London, England

for export to the court of Catherine II of Russia. [8] In 1781 the brewery changed hands and the beer became known as Barclay Perkins Imperial Brown Stout. When the brewery was taken over by Courage the beer was renamed Courage Imperial Russian

Stout. [9] It has a high alcohol content - nine or ten percent abv is common.

790
All Grain Brewing / Re: All grain brewing in the winter
« on: November 05, 2011, 10:28:01 AM »
It's cold here in the winter, which makes it a great time of year to brew Alts and Lagers.  I do most of my brewing from the fall through spring.  One alternative, the one that I use when it gets too cold to brew outside, is to make 3 to 3.5 gallon AG batches on my kitchen stove.  That's just about the upper limit I can hit and still get a proper boil.

Thats my limit as well. That is the size of the boils I was doing when I did extract brewing. I thought about just extract brewing through the winter but I have a back log of grain I would like to use while it is fresh.

791
All Grain Brewing / Re: All grain brewing in the winter
« on: November 05, 2011, 07:40:10 AM »
Suds I was thinking I might have to explore that option. But the other suggestion of a cheap pond pump sounds good too. I saw some at lowes.com for $20

Problem with brewing outdoors and chilling indoors is that after 3 hernia surgeries I really don't want to carry a pot with 5 gallons of liquid in it.

792
All Grain Brewing / Re: All grain brewing in the winter
« on: November 05, 2011, 07:01:55 AM »
Seajellie I like how you only see the positives. Thankyou that was helpful. I will look into a pond pump.

793
All Grain Brewing / Re: All grain brewing in the winter
« on: November 03, 2011, 03:44:36 PM »
How do you do a partial boil with an all grain brew? Do you not sparge?

794
All Grain Brewing / Re: All grain brewing in the winter
« on: November 03, 2011, 07:26:30 AM »
I can't use my garden hose in the winter. When the temperatures really drop there is a danger of bursting pipes if I don't shut my outside spigots off. What does the acronym HLT stand for?

795
All Grain Brewing / All grain brewing in the winter
« on: November 03, 2011, 07:03:40 AM »
I did a search on this before asking on the forum. Nothing came up so if I am rehashing an old thread please let me know and point me to it.

This will be my first winter all grain brewing. I did extracts the last two winters. My concern is the need to steep my grains in the cold, and how to cool my wort without a chiller (the garden hose will be put away).

I have a small unattached garage that I will be using for my brewery. I use a Rubbermaid 10 gallon cooler for a mash tun. Will that maintain the temperatures I need for an hour on a cold day? And for cooling the wort, should I just put the lid on my kettle and let it sit in the cold? Maybe put it outside to get the wind to blow on it? Stir it frequently?

Would I be better off switching back to extract brewing until the weather warms up?

I am open to advice and suggestions.

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