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Messages - narcout

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1846
These were really fun to watch. This one was by far my favorite though:

AHA SOB Big Brew Day 2010 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVazBXxQ5qY
.youtube.com/watch?v=JquCXeiYcq8]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JquCXeiYcq8[/url]

1847
http://www.mbaa.com/TechQuarterly/Abstracts/1996/tq96ab09.htm

"It was also found that higher pitching rates led to lower bitterness unit levels in the resulting beers (possibly due to the uptake of bitter substances by yeast cell walls and/or to increased foaming during fermentation) . . ."

I think it's cool that the tasters in Sean's experiment perceived the beer with the higher pitching rate to be less bitter.

It would be really awesome if someone who had access to and has read these scientific studies would put together a short summary of the results most relevant to homebrewers. Then we could all share in the knowledge. If the summary was citated, then people who were interested in more detailed results would have a guide as to which articles they might want to purchase in full.

1848
Ingredients / Re: Flaked Oats - Protein Rest Necessary?
« on: May 05, 2010, 04:40:27 PM »
I use a pound of flaked oats per 5 gallon batch (which is just under 9% of the grist) in my oatmeal stout without doing a protein rest, and it turns out great.

1849
Has anybody else here done this test?

I remember doing it in our 6th grade science class. That was awhile ago, but I don't think I was one of the people who could taste it.

1850
I'm about 15 minutes into the mash on a saison - finally going to try that 3711.

1851
I read the chapter in Brewing with Wheat on the weiss beers of Southern Germany yesterday, and I was surprised to learn how many of the breweries use a decoction mash for their hefeweizens. I didn't realize that was traditional.

Also interesting was the fact that Spaten abandoned decoction mashing in favor of a single infusion at 144F for their Fransizkaner Hefeweissbier. According to the head of brewing operations (Dr. Jorg Lehmann), they did a series of blind taste tastes in which participants couldn't tell the difference. By way of explanation, he is also quoted as saying "The malt quality has improved very much."

I do plan to try a decoction mash on my next hefeweizen.

Another thing I found interesting (which has nothing to do with decoction mashing but rather it reminded me of Kai's experiments with skimming) is that many of the brewers interviewed for the book talked about skimming the yeast and protein material from the top of the beer during fermentation. One of them notes specifically that this has to do with furthering the smoothness of the beer and is not just for yeast propagation purposes.

1852
Me too, must be the braid. ;)

Fine, I'm switching and will report back...

I just tried the braid for the first time. The wort cleared much more quickly, I was able to run it off faster than before (without chunks of grain coming through), and it stayed clear until the end.

I know other people have had great success with the bazooka tube, but, at least for my setup, the braid seems to work much better.

1853
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brew Balls?
« on: March 19, 2010, 11:54:11 PM »
I actually think they are kind of cool.

I ferment in 10 gallon cornies so I either have to reach my hairy arm way in there with a wine thief or use CO2 pressure to push a sample out through the liquid QD. I can do both, but it'd definitely be easier to just shine a flashlight in there and check which balls are still floating.

I agree that the default range is pretty useless. I wouldn't mind having a set calibrated at 1.016, 1.014, 1.012, 1.010, and 1.008.  Not that I'm actually going to spend the money on them, but I could definitely see them being useful - provided they actually work of course.

1854
The Pub / Re: Well that will certainly keep you awake.
« on: March 19, 2010, 01:31:45 AM »
Just preparing to go to bed at 4 PDT when suddenly 15 miles away.. a 4.4 magnitude.

Knocked a couple things off the wall and pretty much scotched the idea of sleep anytime soon.

http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/ci14601172.htm

Yeah, this one woke me up.

1855
The Pub / Re: Odd Ways You Never Thought to Make Money
« on: March 19, 2010, 01:27:03 AM »
I hope to finally get started on a book I've been talking to Brewers Publications about.

It's about time.   ;)

1856
Me too, must be the braid. ;)

Fine, I'm switching and will report back...

1857
All Grain Brewing / How do you handle the very last of the runnings?
« on: March 08, 2010, 11:13:20 PM »
I find that during sparging, the very last of the runoff (maybe the last 1-2 quarts) get very cloudy and full of grain particulate. I think this is because the liquid level is now well below the level of the grainbed and therefore is not being well filtered.

At this point, I stop the flow into the kettle, prop one side of the tun up with a large book, and drain the last of the runoff through a fine mesh hop bag into a pitcher. The hop bag catches all of the little grain particules but there is some white fluffy stuff that it does not filter out. This stuff is very fine and looks a lot like cold break. It does eventually settle out to the bottom of the pitcher, but it takes a while.

My questions are (1) what is this stuff (protein?) and (2) is it a bad idea to add it to the boil kettle? It's nice to be able to drain pretty much all of the wort out of the tun and add it to the boil but if this stuff is detrimental to the beer I'll start discarding it. My guess is that it's harmless and probably settles out with the break material during chilling, but I want to know what you all think.

1858
The Pub / NY times article on beer travel
« on: February 26, 2010, 07:29:52 PM »

1859
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Kegkits/Tom Hargrave
« on: February 25, 2010, 06:12:54 PM »
Why don't you guys just hire an attorney and file a civil suite - a class action on behalf of everyone who has been ripped off?

You could probably find someone to take it on contingency, especially in this economy.


1860
Equipment and Software / Re: Anyone use this fermenter before?
« on: February 18, 2010, 12:19:22 AM »
a poster on another board had drilled holes around the outside of the top so it would flex some to get the whole top off. wish i could remember who or witch board he was on, he had detail instruction on how to get the top off.

This might be what you are looking for:

http://www.thebeerjournals.com/Fermenter_Page.html

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