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Messages - narcout

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406
I figured the purported extra body created by step mashing would be from unfermentable sugars. If its not that, does anyone know what it is? And how the step mash creates it but single infusion doesn't?

Look up glycoproteins, supposedly released at mash temps around 160.  Kai touches on them briefly, and they are mentioned in some other sources I have seen.

Edit: Below is the relevant page from Kai's site.

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Decoction_Mashing

"Narziss [Narziss, 2005] and Fix [Fix, 1999] suggest, that a rest at 158 - 162 *F (70 - 72 *C) benefits head retention and body of the beer though glycoproteides that are extracted from the malt but not degraded by enzymatic activity. Because of that Narziss suggests holding this rest up to 60 min."

407
Haven't most of the scientific facts about mashing already been proven empirically by professional scientists?  I guess I don't see much point in arguing about them.

What I think is more valuable (and more feasible for non-professional scientist homebrewers) is examining the subjective effects of different variables on actual tasters.     

408
That's a Westmalle Dubbel on the right.  It isn't the greatest picture, but you can see that it's a bit hazy.


409
Agreed it's not brilliantly clear.

The Rocheforts and Chimays I am getting are all somewhat murky.

410
If you read the Bru's Views, John Wible states that in his case the haze is protein haze from adjuncts such as flaked oats and wheat, not yeast.

I thought Heady Topper was pretty tasty.  I didn't realize it was cloudy, but I was drinking it out of a can at a Phish show.  I haven't had the chance to try beers from any of these other breweries yet.


411
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Always start low and go high?
« on: March 31, 2016, 09:27:07 PM »
I can't think of a strain or a reason why I would pitch higher than my main fermentation temp.

I interpreted the OP's post as asking whether you would ever want to pitch at the same temp you plan to ferment at rather than a few degrees below.

412


I'm also replacing the liquid lines in my kegerator with that ultra barrier silver anti-microbial tubing.


What made you want to move to those lines?

It's just time to change the lines, and I've heard good things. 

My experience with the regular tubing is that it's a crap shoot as to whether the particular tubing you receive will impart a plastic flavor to the first ounce or two of beer that has been sitting in it.  I understand this is a non-issue with the silver barrier tubing.

Are those the barrier lines with a higher resistance than normal barrier lines?

According to MoreBeer, they provide 2.2 lbs. of restriction per foot, which I think is the same as the normal lines.

413
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Always start low and go high?
« on: March 31, 2016, 05:26:36 PM »
I think it really depends on what the end goal is.

Please elaborate and give an example.

Speaking very generally and ignoring other factors that might be relevant (pitch rate, etc.), pitching cooler tends to produce a cleaner beer with less yeast character. 

That might be desirable for an APA but maybe less so for an ESB.

It's also strain dependent.  You can pitch fairly warm with US-05 and still end up with a relatively clean beer, but if you pitch 1214 much above the mid 60's, you're likely to end up with some banana flavors (at least that has been my experience).

414
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Always start low and go high?
« on: March 31, 2016, 02:09:50 PM »
I think it really depends on what the end goal is. 

415
I'm brewing a single hop APA (Eureka) tomorrow night, kegging an English ale (British Golden Ale?) tonight, and tapping a keg of Belgian Strong Golden sometime over the weekend.

I'm also replacing the liquid lines in my kegerator with that ultra barrier silver anti-microbial tubing.


416
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Review of new keg from India
« on: March 30, 2016, 02:24:36 PM »
These kegs are on sale right now at Beverage Elements for $74. 

I just bought another one, having been sprayed in the face last week due to an issue with the liquid post on one of my older kegs. 

417
Beer Recipes / Re: Test #2
« on: March 26, 2016, 09:06:24 AM »
Running it really warm (like 90 degrees) the entire time also works.

At the expense of flavor, IMO.  Drew and I discuss this on the podcast coming out Wed.

I tried it and liked it.  Will listen to podcast

418
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Winter Wyeast PC Strains
« on: March 26, 2016, 06:49:55 AM »
Well, there was no activity after 12 hours, but it was going strong when I checked on it at 22 hours.  I haven't checked the gravity, but it looks like it was finished or close to it after 3.5 days.

I ended up fermenting at 69-70 the entire time. 

I'll keg it up sometime late next week.

Edit: I kegged it tonight, and it tastes pretty good.  FG was 1.013 from 1.046 which is an AA of about 72%.

419
Ive used a brewbucket for a few months now and love it. Beats the heck out of plastic and/or carboys. 

considering adding a peltier stout tank fermenter (haven't acted yet though). Advantages would be standalone temp control, closed co2 transfers to kegs, sanitary design, and yeast harvesting...

You can pull off closed CO2 transfers to kegs with the brewbucket.  I have one too and really like it.

420
Beer Recipes / Re: Test #2
« on: March 26, 2016, 06:39:06 AM »
Running it really warm (like 90 degrees) the entire time also works.

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