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Messages - beersk

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: Today at 07:37:13 AM »
Life's to short to drink s***ty beer!  :P

Since I am constantly testing methods, procedures, and ingredients. I dump a lot of beer.
Well, when you're broke-a$$ like me, that isn't always feasible.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: Today at 07:13:17 AM »
Well, here is a picture of a recent brew that most people don't post!

I had called it "Kitchen Sink Lager" because I just make it with all the spare things I had laying around one weekend, I guess this is another use for the name.  Drank about 3/4 of it and need the space for something better...down she goes.


I have ben there and done that.


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Same here. I pretty regularly dump a small amount to make room for something new.
What sucks is when you have to dump a nearly full keg because it just doesn't taste right AND you need the space for another beer. But I'd rather not waste the liver damage and calories on something that sucks. It's kind of why I'm glad I'm brewing 2.5 gallon batches now; not as much to dump if it turns out poorly. But it also only lasts a week and a half if it's really good...trade off. But I'm also trying to cut back on my consumption so it lasts longer than that.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: decoction mashing / home brewing myths
« on: December 07, 2016, 02:29:17 PM »
I have read that decoction is a dated method and completely unnecessary for grains available to us today. There is always contradiction to everything. I'm still a newbie so I don't have any experience to share with decoction.


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I still have the opinion that it was used before well modified malts and accurate thermometers. Completely unnecessary today.

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 01:47:00 PM »
It's the same thing of someone who's used to drinking Folgers or even 8 O'clock coffee and thinks that's the best, then tries a great Fair Trade quality roast and hates it, or at the very least, doesn't think it's any better. They wouldn't know quality if presented to them. But I guess that kind of makes all this arguing pointless, huh? Like I said earlier! We didn't need to go back down this rabbit hole, ugh. Moving on.

But you have no idea of the level of sophistication of those tasters, right?  In effect, you're saying "if they don't like what I like, then they're wrong".  You are overlooking the possibility that they knew exactly what what they were looking for taste wise, and in essence setting yourself up as superior to them.  An "Emperor's New Clothes" attitude.
If they say Folgers is the creme de la creme, they're wrong. End of argument.

I'm just laughing at myself here and how silly this all is. It's just like 6 months ago, sigh...

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 01:41:37 PM »

- Let's not forget that, as an example, there is published data indicating that the preference for a fresh vs a stale lager was 50/50 so low oxygen may not make "better" beer for everyone.

And this certainly is true, sadly. It's a matter of what you come to know as "fresh" beer, thinking it's the best there is, and developing a taste for that flavor quality.
But I suppose the proles only knew low grade chocolate and stale bread. I don't know why one wouldn't jump up and down when something good and fresh was presented to them.

I tried and tried to come up with a reply to this that wasn't insulting or condescending....
It's the same thing of someone who's used to drinking Folgers or even 8 O'clock coffee and thinks that's the best, then tries a great Fair Trade quality roast and hates it, or at the very least, doesn't think it's any better. They wouldn't know quality if presented to them.

EDIT: part of post removed, because...it's just not worth keeping the argument going.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 11:55:38 AM »

- Let's not forget that, as an example, there is published data indicating that the preference for a fresh vs a stale lager was 50/50 so low oxygen may not make "better" beer for everyone.

And this certainly is true, sadly. It's a matter of what you come to know as "fresh" beer, thinking it's the best there is, and developing a taste for that flavor quality.
But I suppose the proles only knew low grade chocolate and stale bread. I don't know why one wouldn't jump up and down when something good and fresh was presented to them.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 10:40:50 AM »
on a homebrew level?

maybe lets not get into this. From reading past posts here, most people that engage with you on anything more than a surface level get called amateur hobbyists, or in my case, ignorant.
Yes, let's NOT get into this. This is so June of 2016. This thread is for questions and information about low oxygen brewing. Not arguing the merits and trying to disprove the work people have done for the past 2 years.
I admit, like Derek, I had a long point of contention with Bryan, but the science part of my brain knew that this had merit and wanted to try it for myself. Boom, better beer. It's a process, it's like learning to brew all over again. It's exciting. So please, stay, discuss. But arguing against this idea will get you nowhere. We've been there, seriously. If you want to get your fill of that, we can surely point you to those threads from 6 months ago.

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 06, 2016, 08:40:25 AM »
Besides Bayareabrewer being about 6 months late to the argument and hate against low O2, and as much as I'd LOVE to revisit that old chestnut, we should get back on topic of questions about low O2.

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 06, 2016, 08:30:56 AM »
Know what you mean, Pete. You really have to keep an eye out and have that money in the bank in case there's a killer deal. Once in a while I see the kegs are $69 a piece and I kick myself for not having the disposable funds to pick a couple up. If you wait a bit, they'll come back down.

10
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 05, 2016, 08:55:16 PM »
Hah, you continue to prove you didn't even click on the link. That link is FULL of research papers and brewing literature.
After you get done ACTUALLY clicking the link to find the answers you seek. Call bsg and tell them they are selling bunk products to professional brewers.


Taken directly from my grain room.


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Well, doesn't BSG sell pH stabilizer 5.2? That is a bunk product.  :P

But, that aside, we're using the NaMeta in a mash pH range of 5.1-5.4 for the bulk of its protection anyway. The other protection is kegging with extract left and naturally carbonating. So whether NaMeta is effective in the pH range of 4-4.5 is a moot point. Is it not?

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 05, 2016, 02:27:15 PM »
I got mine for about $75 with shipping to SoCal. They were $84 each, but AIH had a $50off $250. So about $225-230 with ground transit for three.
Ah, you must've moved when you changed your name from "Steve in TX", yes? How long's that been, a year or two now? Damn, time really flies by...
I plan to get more of these kegs. My chest freezer can fit 4 - 5 gallon kegs on the floor and a 2.5 on the hump. With a bunch of 2.5's, I can fit 8 on the floor and one on the hump and have 9 kegs! That'll be a while before I have that many though and I may not even get that many. Not sure I'm completely done with 5 gallon batches yet.

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 05, 2016, 02:22:25 PM »
I think its an interesting thought. I don't know how well it would work in execution. The fill completely with sanitizer, and co2 push method is about as easy and foolproof as it gets.

How short are you cutting your gas in post dip tube to get that sanitizer to fill up your keg?

And another quick question regarding carbonating beers with normal commercial CO2 gas?
   -Once the beer has been spunded properly and allowed to naturally carbonate, I assume you are then using
    your CO2 just to push the beer out for dispensing?
   - If so, haven't you stated before that most normal CO2 is not fully pure and can actually add to the   oxidation of your beer over time (maybe I was imagining this)?
   -If you are dispensing with normal CO2, then doesn't the beer absorb some of this gas as the keg is slowly
    consumed over time leading to potential oxidation, or is this negligible?

I don't cut my tubes. I built a little adapter that goes from the faucet to the gas in post and I fill it though there with the lid on but the PRV open, when water comes out the PRV that means the keg is completely full. Even if it is not we are using the active yeast on the spund transfer to eat up that residual o2. Spunding will also naturally rouse the yeast which will encourage proper final attenuation.

Thats correct, Spund then normal co2 to push the beer. You are totally correct in the fact that the co2 has enough oxygen to oxidize a batch. If you force carb you WILL be over the acceptable limit of DO.
You are also correct on it oxidizing slowly, but this is why we use sulfury german lager strains. These strains not only produce sulfur(a great natural antioxidant) but the yeast themselves produce about 10ppm of sulfites for us. So those 2 things will help you protect against that. This is why sulfur can fade in a closed keg, its reacting with the oxygen in the co2.

I'm sorry man, but this flies in the face of what I've seen countless award winning breweries do that are run by educated and experienced head brewers.
Are these the same head brewers that throw pound after pound of hops at the kettle? Just because they win awards in the category of "over hopped" doesn't mean they actually know the real nitty-gritty science of brewing. I'm not claiming to know more than they do, however I think the attitude that they are the all-knowing brewing masters needs to be rethought.
And you're absolutely right, it DOES fly in the face of these brew masters.

I had the pleasure of drinking a few Northeast IPAs yesterday. Those brewers are doing some low o2 brewing and as much as I despise the cloudy-as-f*ck orange juice beers, they really are well brewed and tasty. I just wish they'd get over the mindset that hops are everything.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 05, 2016, 09:20:11 AM »
Sounds like MoreBeer is probably your best bet, Pete, since it's in PA. And you probably won't find used 2.5 gallon kegs, but the new ones at Adventures in Homebrewing are fantastic. I have 3 of them. You can generally get them for $75 each, which is very reasonable for new kegs.
That is a better price than I Have seen for 2.5 gallons. Why are these particular kegs fantastic?
They're ISO 9001 certified and NSF approved, they're good quality. They're $79 on AiH right now, but if you time it right, you can get them for $69 each. I timed it bad this last time I bought some, which was Black Friday when they were $69 (I had ordered 2 on the Monday before Black Friday, D'oh!).

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 05, 2016, 07:33:31 AM »
How long are you taking to dough in?  I find that I have to add the water to the grain very slowly, otherwise I don't get good wetting of the grain.  For example, I have 10lb of pils malt in a 10g round cooler, and I'm putting in 5gal of water and I let it go in over the course of about 5 minutes and that still seemed too fast because the grain mass floated up and then later had to settle down into the water.  The last couple times I tried it, I found that I got dry spots if I didn't put it in very slow (previously I would have just run it in and then stirred it up...but I guess that is out).

My dough in takes 10 minutes.
That's a fairly long time, but good to know. Probably takes me 5 minutes to dough in.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pale Lager off flavors
« on: December 05, 2016, 07:23:46 AM »
Could it be sulfur?


I don't believe so but maybe I am misidentifying it.
Since it goes away eventually and smells I thought maybe sulfur.

Sulfur is usually described as rotten eggs. That's what I smell from the fermenter when sulfur is out gassing. But in the beer, I think the taste is more complex and I am not sure I can adequately describe what I associate with sulfur. I think sulfur  comes across as similar to  skunked flavor to me.


This article has a table of descriptors which may help.

https://www.morebeer.com/articles/sulfur_compounds_in_beer

Sulfur can also present itself in a burnt match smell.
You should be able to pick it up in the hops themselves if it is isovaleric acid. However, not meaning to overlook the obvious but: when was the last time you cleaned your lines?
Yeah, this reminds me that I should probably clean mine as well. But he said it was only in this beer, I believe.
The only time I've had this type of off flavor/aroma, I've attributed it to old hops, whether stored properly or not, I think they can go stale over time from opening and resealing, etc. which is why I plan to start buying my hops by the 4oz bag.

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