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Messages - beersk

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1
A couple of days, sure, but 5 days? I'd be pitching more yeast after 3 days, at least, I think.
I generally don't like to pitch slurry if it's more than 4 weeks old, at which point I'll make a 1L starter 24 hours before brewing to wake it up again and pitch the whole thing.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lagering/Filtration
« on: August 21, 2015, 11:42:57 AM »
Denny, you crash in buckets, yes? Does it suck all your sanitizer back from the airlock? That's only thing I don't like about cold crashing.

If you fill the airlock to the line that doesn't happen. A few milliliters of sanitizer isn't going to do anything, though.
It always does for me...

@Joe Sr. - True, but it's gross to me. I use it on the occasion, but typically avoid it and just give the beer time and it clears just fine. I don't usually need my beer clear RIGHT NOW anyway.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Lagering/Filtration
« on: August 21, 2015, 10:22:50 AM »
Denny, you crash in buckets, yes? Does it suck all your sanitizer back from the airlock? That's only thing I don't like about cold crashing.
Gelatin works, but then you have to put that nasty sh*t in your beer. I try not to add anything "unnatural" if I can help it.

4
Thanks for the tip, Toby :)

5
Where did he source the Armadillo? That must be pricey, unless you're in the southern states...

It was my understand that blending yeast tended to favor the stronger fermenter of the 2 yeasts, basically making it pointless to blend yeasts.

He bought the Armadillo hops from Yakima Valley Hops, said they're pretty incredible: http://www.yakimavalleyhops.com/ARMADILLOLEAF8OZ_p/hopsexparmadilloleaf2.htm

I've heard the same about blending yeasts, I think Greg's goal in adding the 090 after the Vermont was to get the ester character from the former and the attenuation of the latter. We have more blend xBmts on the list, I'm pretty excited to get to those!
I see. I was unaware of this Armadillo hop variety. I was being silly and thinking he used actual Armadillo (kidding of course).

6
Equipment and Software / Re: I finally did it
« on: August 17, 2015, 08:09:56 AM »
Been there, cursed about that, now happily using buckets. As the saying goes "There are two kinds of glass carboy users; those that have dropped one, and those who will.".
Ha, well, I'm sure it's possible. I was VERY careful. I have a friend who uses carboys and does not (ever) take them out of their milk crate he carries them in.
I switched from carboys to kegs, and lately I've been using buckets because my batch size went up a tad to where kegs are too small. The whole spigot thing isn't that big of a deal, I love the auto siphon and have an extra as a back up. Doing a closed transfer with keg fermenters is really nice though. Kind of wish I had 3 gallon kegs and fermented smaller batches in my kegs, or could brew and split 6 gallon batches with different yeast. Perhaps I'll move to that some day.

7
Where did he source the Armadillo? That must be pricey, unless you're in the southern states...

It was my understand that blending yeast tended to favor the stronger fermenter of the 2 yeasts, basically making it pointless to blend yeasts.

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Turning Around a Hefeweizen Quickly
« on: August 17, 2015, 06:57:19 AM »
You should have no problem kegging it after two weeks, or less, if your fermentation was healthy.  I wouldn't cold crash before kegging because you're going to miss that yeast later.  It will clear in the keg, but if enough yeast was transferred over you can shake the keg up and reintroduce yeast from the bottom later on.

That's exactly what I do. Keg @ 2 weeks,  rock the keg to re-suspend the yeast when necessary.
I don't think I'd worry about re-suspending the yeast. I have a hefe turned kristalweizen now on tap and it still tastes awesome. It's gotta be almost gone, I've been hitting it hard. It's the bottomless keg, which I'm fine with, it's been tasting great.
Ten days in the fermenter should be enough for most ales in the 1.050 range, where the yeast character plays a big role.

9
How does this person on HBT know what level of dissolved oxygen they're getting in their wort?

This. Oxygenating without a DO meter is just guesswork. With aeration, you can at least say with some confidence that you're getting close to saturation levels - which are ~9 ppm at 18°C/64°F and ~12 ppm at 8°C/46°F. So the guy arguing didn't even do his math right.
Agree, 100%. Using a wand pretty much takes the guess work out of it. Whether it makes a difference to the finished beer or not is the real argument here. It probably doesn't, but I'm not going to quit using mine. Same as the dry yeast debate - rehydrate or pitch dry. Do what you do, I'll do what I do.

10
One of the things i gripe to my wife about all the time is that the internet is the best thing and the worst thing at the same time. Too much information can be a bad thing after a certain point in the hands of the wrong people.

This lends itself to many hobbies. I used to frequent some of the guitar tube amp forums and many of the same problems plagued them as well. Given access to so many opinions and such a multitude of information, people are bound to have many different opinions on many subjects with various levels of merit attached to them. Some opinions are heavily steeped in confirmation bias and some are groomed through experience.

I find the former frustrating and latter enlightening.
Well, in playing an instrument, technique is paramount if you want to excel. Equipment is only a medium to getting the sounds you want. As a drummer, having a really good set of drums and cymbals helps me to achieve the sounds I want. Practice a sh!t ton got me to the point of using those sounds to my benefit. A good musician can make a sh!tty set up sound good, but only to a point.

So, I'm not sure how this relates to the current topic, but you're using music analogy so I thought I'd add to it. Maybe aeration with a stone and pure o2 vs a mix stir is like having a 2 bass drum setup vs a double pedal setup. One is simpler, more compact and less expensive. The other is more powerful, more to haul, more to keep in tune (unless triggers are being used). Two separate pedals are more efficient than a double pedal with an axle shaft for the slave pedal. But the double pedal is good enough for almost all applications, especially with modern technology.

Got a bit off topic there... maybe it's just all what you're willing to put up with. Plenty of drummers use 2 bass drums, plenty use 1 with a double pedal and are just as fast... I'm an extreme metal drummer, that's why I'm using speed as an indicator of the equipment quality. It's pretty tough to play fast on really crappy pedals.

11
I think the true folly here is entering into an argument on HBT. There is a reason why many of us choose this forum as our home base. The attitude is much different 'round these parts.

And HomeBrewTalk is just as DIY and scientific, at the same time, as this place, if not more so.

My beef is definitely not with HBT. 90% of the people that post there are great.

My problem, which carries over to real life and work as well, is not with someone having a strong opinion on something. I'm an engineer working in Nuclear so opinions backed up with technical expertise are valued. My real problem is someone telling another person that there is this way, my way, of doing it for the best results. Add in misconstrued or misunderstood scientific articles and technical information to back up opinions and my head starts to hurt.

This is especially true for something subjective like taste.

It's like telling a guitar player, "You can make good sound with a Fender Twin Reverb, but if you want to make the best sound, you need a Marshall Superlead full stack."

Both are equally valid tools in the hands of their users. The difference is in preference and comfort using that tool.
Good points. Taste is subjective...who knows, y'alls beer might suck, mine might suck. I don't know. What's it matter? I have people in my homebrew club who've brewed for a long time, and pontificate all the time about this and that, "this is how I do it" like it's the best possible way...and sh!t, I'm guilty of this too, but I can still tell they've a long ways to come in their beer quality...as well as I do. A lot of the stuff I pontificate to my club that I do is stuff I learned from this site...and I know, sadly, none of them really read this site or any other homebrew forums, as far as I know. But, that's neither here nor there...or anywhere.

Another thing I always find amusing is when people say, "I do [insert whatever method, etc here] and my beer turns out great!" This person might think Shock Top is the greatest beer in the world for all I know, or thinks Amber Bock is an actual bock... ya just can't trust these people until you've had their beer.

On a slightly different note, why is aerating with pure O2 more of a big deal on a commercial scale and not so much on a homebrew scale? What difference would batch size have to do with it? Maybe you should tell commercial breweries to get a really big mix stir and aerate that way.

12
I bought an O2 canister a few years back, used it on a few batches, then piled it away with the rest of the questionable brewing gear purchases. I have been known to break it out once or twice a year for the really big beers, but even then I'm not sure it makes a huge difference. I don't use pure O2 in my 18% melomels, and they turn out just fine. I'm not sure if you can draw an exact correlation to beer from that, but that makes me feel a bit more confident skipping the O2.

I brew smaller batches, so I probably overpitch when I use dry yeast. And for liquid yeast I'm typically either making a starter and pitching it at high krausen or brewing a style where underoxygenation isn't necessarily a bad thing (i.e., styles where I want a bit more flavor expression from the yeast). In other words, I'm not necessarily the type of brewer that would necessarily see a lot of the purported benefits of pure-O2.

Nowadays, most of my beer is poured through a series of mesh screens to filter out hop trub before it hits the fermenter. I'm pretty confident that this is giving me all the aeration I need.

I think the true folly here is entering into an argument on HBT. There is a reason why many of us choose this forum as our home base. The attitude is much different 'round these parts.

Man, why are you going through all that trouble to separate the trub? I think you're wasting your time there. I know you brew smaller batches, but still...

And HomeBrewTalk is just as DIY and scientific, at the same time, as this place, if not more so. Do you read there or post there often? Everything one could need to know about brewing is on that site. I don't think the attitudes are all that different, it's just a different group of people, more of a broad spectrum of brewers.

Steve, I have one of the stones that is on a stainless steel wand. Best invention for aeration stones ever.

13
It's not a matter of telling the difference in flavor, I've just had less attenuation issues since switching to pure O2. I know it's probably a waste, but I brew a lot of lagers (50-75% of my batches) so I want to make sure I start off with good amounts of dissolved O2.

And a stone isn't hard to keep up. Some of y'all use pH meters...now come on, don't give me that excuse that a stone is hard to maintain...

But maybe I'll have to get my mixstir back out and give it a go...

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 8 month old tastes phenomenal
« on: August 13, 2015, 01:49:12 PM »
That post title makes it sound like you were eating an 8 month old baby or some kind of animal.

I had a weizenbock that was bottled off the keg about 2 years ago last night. It was tasty. Also had a porter that I found in my closet that's been there for probably 8 or 9 months. It was amazing. It had mold around the cap, haha.
That's why bottling is so fun, when you find those mystery bottles. Feel a bit sorry for the people who write off bottling for good when they start kegging.
One of the pluses for making 6 gal. batches is that, if you keg 5 gal., there's still 10-12 bottles that you can squirrel away.
Yeah, that is fun to do. I've just been bottling off the keg to turn batches over quicker if I want something else on. Kind of the best of both options for me.

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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 8 month old tastes phenomenal
« on: August 13, 2015, 06:18:26 AM »
That post title makes it sound like you were eating an 8 month old baby or some kind of animal.

I had a weizenbock that was bottled off the keg about 2 years ago last night. It was tasty. Also had a porter that I found in my closet that's been there for probably 8 or 9 months. It was amazing. It had mold around the cap, haha.
That's why bottling is so fun, when you find those mystery bottles. Feel a bit sorry for the people who write off bottling for good when they start kegging.

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