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Messages - beersk

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1
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 05, 2016, 08:55:16 PM »
Hah, you continue to prove you didn't even click on the link. That link is FULL of research papers and brewing literature.
After you get done ACTUALLY clicking the link to find the answers you seek. Call bsg and tell them they are selling bunk products to professional brewers.


Taken directly from my grain room.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Well, doesn't BSG sell pH stabilizer 5.2? That is a bunk product.  :P

But, that aside, we're using the NaMeta in a mash pH range of 5.1-5.4 for the bulk of its protection anyway. The other protection is kegging with extract left and naturally carbonating. So whether NaMeta is effective in the pH range of 4-4.5 is a moot point. Is it not?

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 05, 2016, 02:27:15 PM »
I got mine for about $75 with shipping to SoCal. They were $84 each, but AIH had a $50off $250. So about $225-230 with ground transit for three.
Ah, you must've moved when you changed your name from "Steve in TX", yes? How long's that been, a year or two now? Damn, time really flies by...
I plan to get more of these kegs. My chest freezer can fit 4 - 5 gallon kegs on the floor and a 2.5 on the hump. With a bunch of 2.5's, I can fit 8 on the floor and one on the hump and have 9 kegs! That'll be a while before I have that many though and I may not even get that many. Not sure I'm completely done with 5 gallon batches yet.

3
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 05, 2016, 02:22:25 PM »
I think its an interesting thought. I don't know how well it would work in execution. The fill completely with sanitizer, and co2 push method is about as easy and foolproof as it gets.

How short are you cutting your gas in post dip tube to get that sanitizer to fill up your keg?

And another quick question regarding carbonating beers with normal commercial CO2 gas?
   -Once the beer has been spunded properly and allowed to naturally carbonate, I assume you are then using
    your CO2 just to push the beer out for dispensing?
   - If so, haven't you stated before that most normal CO2 is not fully pure and can actually add to the   oxidation of your beer over time (maybe I was imagining this)?
   -If you are dispensing with normal CO2, then doesn't the beer absorb some of this gas as the keg is slowly
    consumed over time leading to potential oxidation, or is this negligible?

I don't cut my tubes. I built a little adapter that goes from the faucet to the gas in post and I fill it though there with the lid on but the PRV open, when water comes out the PRV that means the keg is completely full. Even if it is not we are using the active yeast on the spund transfer to eat up that residual o2. Spunding will also naturally rouse the yeast which will encourage proper final attenuation.

Thats correct, Spund then normal co2 to push the beer. You are totally correct in the fact that the co2 has enough oxygen to oxidize a batch. If you force carb you WILL be over the acceptable limit of DO.
You are also correct on it oxidizing slowly, but this is why we use sulfury german lager strains. These strains not only produce sulfur(a great natural antioxidant) but the yeast themselves produce about 10ppm of sulfites for us. So those 2 things will help you protect against that. This is why sulfur can fade in a closed keg, its reacting with the oxygen in the co2.

I'm sorry man, but this flies in the face of what I've seen countless award winning breweries do that are run by educated and experienced head brewers.
Are these the same head brewers that throw pound after pound of hops at the kettle? Just because they win awards in the category of "over hopped" doesn't mean they actually know the real nitty-gritty science of brewing. I'm not claiming to know more than they do, however I think the attitude that they are the all-knowing brewing masters needs to be rethought.
And you're absolutely right, it DOES fly in the face of these brew masters.

I had the pleasure of drinking a few Northeast IPAs yesterday. Those brewers are doing some low o2 brewing and as much as I despise the cloudy-as-f*ck orange juice beers, they really are well brewed and tasty. I just wish they'd get over the mindset that hops are everything.

4
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 05, 2016, 09:20:11 AM »
Sounds like MoreBeer is probably your best bet, Pete, since it's in PA. And you probably won't find used 2.5 gallon kegs, but the new ones at Adventures in Homebrewing are fantastic. I have 3 of them. You can generally get them for $75 each, which is very reasonable for new kegs.
That is a better price than I Have seen for 2.5 gallons. Why are these particular kegs fantastic?
They're ISO 9001 certified and NSF approved, they're good quality. They're $79 on AiH right now, but if you time it right, you can get them for $69 each. I timed it bad this last time I bought some, which was Black Friday when they were $69 (I had ordered 2 on the Monday before Black Friday, D'oh!).

5
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« on: December 05, 2016, 07:33:31 AM »
How long are you taking to dough in?  I find that I have to add the water to the grain very slowly, otherwise I don't get good wetting of the grain.  For example, I have 10lb of pils malt in a 10g round cooler, and I'm putting in 5gal of water and I let it go in over the course of about 5 minutes and that still seemed too fast because the grain mass floated up and then later had to settle down into the water.  The last couple times I tried it, I found that I got dry spots if I didn't put it in very slow (previously I would have just run it in and then stirred it up...but I guess that is out).

My dough in takes 10 minutes.
That's a fairly long time, but good to know. Probably takes me 5 minutes to dough in.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pale Lager off flavors
« on: December 05, 2016, 07:23:46 AM »
Could it be sulfur?


I don't believe so but maybe I am misidentifying it.
Since it goes away eventually and smells I thought maybe sulfur.

Sulfur is usually described as rotten eggs. That's what I smell from the fermenter when sulfur is out gassing. But in the beer, I think the taste is more complex and I am not sure I can adequately describe what I associate with sulfur. I think sulfur  comes across as similar to  skunked flavor to me.


This article has a table of descriptors which may help.

https://www.morebeer.com/articles/sulfur_compounds_in_beer

Sulfur can also present itself in a burnt match smell.
You should be able to pick it up in the hops themselves if it is isovaleric acid. However, not meaning to overlook the obvious but: when was the last time you cleaned your lines?
Yeah, this reminds me that I should probably clean mine as well. But he said it was only in this beer, I believe.
The only time I've had this type of off flavor/aroma, I've attributed it to old hops, whether stored properly or not, I think they can go stale over time from opening and resealing, etc. which is why I plan to start buying my hops by the 4oz bag.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« on: December 05, 2016, 07:17:42 AM »
Sounds like MoreBeer is probably your best bet, Pete, since it's in PA. And you probably won't find used 2.5 gallon kegs, but the new ones at Adventures in Homebrewing are fantastic. I have 3 of them. You can generally get them for $75 each, which is very reasonable for new kegs.

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: First Low Oxygen Brew
« on: December 03, 2016, 03:18:03 PM »
Looks like you've got nice hot break in there. I started getting that when I switched to low oxygen. Egg drop soup, huge white clumps of break material. Never had that before. I've also been getting scummy crap on top of the boil, almost like a skin film that forms. I skim that off also.

9
Equipment and Software / Re: Mash Caps
« on: December 02, 2016, 02:34:32 PM »
I used several layers of foil, sort of rolled and crimped on the ends. The foil was slightly bigger than the inside of the cooler, so that I could mold it to the edges and corners. Not sure if it's a long term solution but it turned out a really tasty beer.
I imagine your rolled edges create rigidity. Aluminum isn't an issue?
I asked Bryan this and he didn't seem to think aluminum was a problem...

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: December 02, 2016, 02:30:43 PM »
Thanks, I'm really hoping the carafa III doesn't come through too much. Planning to add it at the end of the mash, or halfway through when I add step infusion water. Low oxygen is messing with me. It was easier before when it was ignorance is bliss.


I'm curious to hear how that carafa III comes out here, Jesse. Yeah, the color adjustments still have me scratching my head. I'm probably headed to Sinamar for that in low O2 beers unless I hear that these small additions can work. Yeah, kinda changes the ballgame, huh?


Definitely does change things. I'm either going to quit brewing dark beers since I don't drink them much anyway or get some sinamar, which isn't available everywhere. I'm thinking adding at mashout or before running off should work fine as a temporary fix though.

Yeah, hopefully so. Honestly I'm wondering if brewing porter and stout (or any roasty beer) non-lodostyle  is the way to go. If the roast is amplified that much in malts like midnight wheat and carafa in lodo, then I can't see how to make a roasty stout work otherwise. Roasted malts are high in antioxidants. Maybe it's the answer for dark, roasty beers.

When you stop and think about, the roasted malts added to beers like stout and porter are more for flavor than color. Backing off the roasted malts in percentage should still maintain the color of the beers. In that sense you aren't really changing the recipe all that much.
Yeah, I'd think you could just back off on the amounts for porter and stout and still get the best results.

I think it wold be interesting to compare dark beers brewed LODO to the more traditional home brewing methods.  Myself, I don't need to add angst to my brew day.  Kind of defeats the purpose.


I'd like to compare, too. Don't get me wrong - I'm a laid back brewer. Just thinking out loud on connecting lodo to dark beers. Only one way to find out, huh?  :)
I'm just thinking that, at this point, I'd like all my beers to be brewed low O2 just for consistency sake. And it just feels pure. So, it's like learning to brew all over again, which makes it both fun and stressful at the same time. Just like any learning process.

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: December 02, 2016, 12:44:48 PM »
Thanks, I'm really hoping the carafa III doesn't come through too much. Planning to add it at the end of the mash, or halfway through when I add step infusion water. Low oxygen is messing with me. It was easier before when it was ignorance is bliss.


I'm curious to hear how that carafa III comes out here, Jesse. Yeah, the color adjustments still have me scratching my head. I'm probably headed to Sinamar for that in low O2 beers unless I hear that these small additions can work. Yeah, kinda changes the ballgame, huh?


Definitely does change things. I'm either going to quit brewing dark beers since I don't drink them much anyway or get some sinamar, which isn't available everywhere. I'm thinking adding at mashout or before running off should work fine as a temporary fix though.

12
Kegging and Bottling / Re: 3 gallon kegs
« on: December 02, 2016, 12:17:40 PM »
Hmmm, check out Farmhouse Brewing Supply. They started getting the ones from India, the AMCYL brand. I've heard those are decent. I have the 2.5 gallon kegs from Adventures in Homebrew. Those are great.

13
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottle Spunding Trappist Ales
« on: December 02, 2016, 12:05:13 PM »
Thanks for posting, Derek. I have the advantage of being able to do this quite easily since I ferment in kegs. I could bottle a couple off at the same time I transfer to spund in the keg.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: December 02, 2016, 11:50:58 AM »
Nice. I'm due for a schwarzbier also. Brewing Vienna lager this weekend though.
32% Vienna
32% Munich
32% Barke Pils
3% Carahell
1% Carafa III
wlp833

Think it's around 23 IBU, OG 1.053

Looks real nice!
Thanks, I'm really hoping the carafa III doesn't come through too much. Planning to add it at the end of the mash, or halfway through when I add step infusion water. Low oxygen is messing with me. It was easier before when it was ignorance is bliss.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend? 01/18/2014
« on: December 02, 2016, 10:36:15 AM »
Nice. I'm due for a schwarzbier also. Brewing Vienna lager this weekend though.
32% Vienna
32% Munich
32% Barke Pils
3% Carahell
1% Carafa III
wlp833

Think it's around 23 IBU, OG 1.053

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