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Messages - beersk

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1321
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: All Grain Fermentation vs. Extract
« on: January 24, 2015, 10:02:55 PM »
Does amount of krausen foreshadow how your head retention in the beer will be? Is there a correlation there?
Could explain some of my head retention issues...my beer typically doesn't get a lot of krausen and I'm wondering what is affecting that. Comes down to water, I'm sure.

If anything, though, it would be the opposite.  The theory is that there are foam positive substances in the beer and once they get used up, they aren't there for future foam production.  In that case, a large krausen would actually cut down on later foam production.
Hmmm, interesting. Thanks for the response, Denny!

1322
Equipment and Software / Re: big mouth bubbler
« on: January 24, 2015, 09:59:39 PM »
You just need to bend the dip tube so there's a 1/4 to 1/2 gallon of deadspace. I cut a couple and wish I hadn't until I discovered that, duh, you can just bend the suckers. Pretty much relieves that point. Cleaning them with a brush is easy enough. I'd get a couple 10 gallon kegs, but they're pricey. Heard about the chico company ones, but buying a factory second makes me kinda nervous, like it's going to have some sh!te weld that makes it impossible to sanitize.

1323
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: All Grain Fermentation vs. Extract
« on: January 23, 2015, 02:41:47 PM »
There's definitely more nutrients in an AG wort than and extract wort. As I have mentioned several times in the past, extract is supposedly lacking in Free Amino Nitrogen. Also, as was mentioned, the break material has nutrients that are probably not present in extract.

And AG will have more protein, which will increase krausen.
Does amount of krausen foreshadow how your head retention in the beer will be? Is there a correlation there?
Could explain some of my head retention issues...my beer typically doesn't get a lot of krausen and I'm wondering what is affecting that. Comes down to water, I'm sure.

1324
Put a bag in your mashtun with your copper manifold, OP, and you'll never get a stuck run off. Just sayin'! I do this, the bag in the mashtun (braided hose) that is, and love it.

1325
Kegging and Bottling / Re: New toy
« on: January 18, 2015, 09:52:34 AM »
Check out all the canned goods on top of the cabinets. I'm moving in.
I never understood why it's called "canned" when they're clearly in jars.

1326
Ingredients / Re: Briess Bonlander Munich?
« on: January 15, 2015, 09:54:17 AM »
It's not really a good substitute. I thought it had a very toasty quality. Although, I will say, I did still enjoy the dunkel I made with it.

1327
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: pickling lime usage
« on: January 15, 2015, 09:51:30 AM »
Good call. I thought about that after I posted, but thought you'd say something. My water is pretty good, so I don't have to worry much about it, fortunately. A gram or so is usually all I need to raise the pH where I want it.

1328
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: pickling lime usage
« on: January 15, 2015, 09:47:26 AM »
FWIW, I use baking soda to raise pH on the darkest of beers and stay with Na limits, using RO water.

EDIT - I see now what you're getting at with the Ca, Ken. I've always gotten things to work out with baking soda, but no harm in using some PL either.
Right and I think a little more sodium is good for dark beers. That's what people are always afraid of when using baking soda, is too much sodium in the water profile. It's really not an issue.

1329
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: efficient small-scale brewing tips
« on: January 14, 2015, 09:26:05 AM »
Thanks, Sean. It looks, though, that the controlled mash is still the best. I usually lose 4-5 degrees over the course of 60-90 minutes and it annoys me. Perhaps I should fahgettaboutit, eh?

1330
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: efficient small-scale brewing tips
« on: January 14, 2015, 06:40:27 AM »


Aim a little high on the mash temp (like 156-158 F) and allow it to fall 6-8 degrees over the course of the mash.  It's all good on the average.  Anyway, you only really need to mash for 40 minutes in my experience, no need for a full 60 or more.



Is that really true, that it's okay if it falls that much over the course of the mash? If that's the case, why do people go to such lengths to maintain their mash temps?

Why indeed?!  All I know is that it works for me, and I don't see why others don't try it.  As long as you're not screaming up above 160 F to kill all your beta amylase, everything should work out well.  People just like to make things difficult.
Makes me curious to do a side by side of a batch where you let the mash fall 6-8 degrees on one and on the other, hold it at a steady mash temp. Wonder what differences there would be...

1331
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: efficient small-scale brewing tips
« on: January 13, 2015, 02:03:02 PM »


Aim a little high on the mash temp (like 156-158 F) and allow it to fall 6-8 degrees over the course of the mash.  It's all good on the average.  Anyway, you only really need to mash for 40 minutes in my experience, no need for a full 60 or more.



Is that really true, that it's okay if it falls that much over the course of the mash? If that's the case, why do people go to such lengths to maintain their mash temps?

1332
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Lager Success Finally
« on: January 12, 2015, 08:41:18 PM »
Pretty much everything is covered here. I love lagers...actually thinking about doing lagers most of the time now as they're the beers I enjoy drinking the most. I keep trying to brew all of these oatmeal stouts and stuff and just get disappointed because they're not what I want to be drinking. Some of the best beers I've brewed have been lagers...I need to keep rollin' with that. Got a helles in the fermenter now...so excited for that.

I like to start the fermentation cold, around 48, let it roll for a few days, then increase the temp by 5 or so degrees, let it roll for a couple days more, then increase again 5 or so degrees. Then after a couple days I'll let it free rise to room temp, which is anywhere  between 63 and 70 for another week, about. Good clean beers... Best beer I ever made was a schwarzbier I made a few months ago...damn that was good. Liquid Schwarz! (patent pending ;)  )

1333
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Classiest beer style
« on: January 12, 2015, 01:25:39 PM »
I think classy is a crystal clear helles or German pils. I was also thinking something like St. Bernardus ABT 12 or Rochefort 10 in a chalice.

1334
Equipment and Software / Re: Ventilation for Indoor Brewing
« on: January 09, 2015, 09:20:53 PM »
Ya tease, Martin! Show us the rest of what you got going on down there! hehe

1335
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Bucket lid problems
« on: January 09, 2015, 07:16:01 AM »
I was actually talking about plain old kettles with the lid resting on top. There is a pretty cool thread on HomeBrewTalk about cutting a silicone hose and putting it on the rim of the kettle and clamping the lid on with binder clamps. Seems like it could be a good way to seal a kettle for fermenting.

Never heard that one. I'll have to read up. Thanks.
Yeah, it seems pretty slick. Don't think it'll work with every kettle, depends if it has a lip or not around the edge for the binder clips to grab on to to make a good seal.

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