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Messages - beersk

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1336
Ingredients / Re: caramunich vs caramel/crystal malt
« on: February 27, 2015, 08:10:51 PM »

1337
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Interesting 1056 behaviour
« on: February 25, 2015, 06:37:11 PM »
Does anyone know if Sierra Nevada uses the same strain for their "lagers"?

Ha, it's funny how you put lagers in quotes. I never thought Sierra Nevada's lagers were very good...they are definitely an ale brewery. The vienna lager was decent that I had in the fall pack last year, but I am not a fan of the Summerfest at all; it just isn't a smooth and clean tasting lager.
And the oktoberfest had a slight roast character to it that took me by surprise.

1338
Equipment and Software / Re: The Crush
« on: February 19, 2015, 11:14:36 AM »
I recently opened my gap up from .032" to .035" and started double crushing. I like the results better and efficiency didn't change.

1339
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: February 19, 2015, 11:08:01 AM »
Interesting discussion, but to the topic, do you also do this with your lagers?  I have decocted in this manner 45/15 or 60/15 with some success, especially for a Munich Helles.  I've even had the second rest at 156-158F due to the uncertainty of the grist volume pulled.  I like the flavor profile achieved with at least one decoction and the head retention from the higher rest step.  I could be wrong, but it seems to have improved my lagers more than anything since doing the RO with salts and lactic adds per Brunwater....
You REALLY notice a difference, huh? I may have to try one again on my next helles. I'm trying to brew a helles every 3rd batch or so just because it's a style I can drink everyday and never get tired of it. I've had poor luck with decoctions in the past though...I never seem to be able to get to my next rest from 145 to 158 and I usually pull a quart for every pound of grist, which ends up being almost all of the grist. Then I always loose several degrees while I'm boiling the decoction (even when the decoction boil is short >10). I just gave up...didn't feel it was worth the effort.

1340
Kegging and Bottling / Re: New Kegs...Used kegs>>>Sales
« on: February 17, 2015, 07:17:03 PM »
just picked up 2 more on sale for $75 each new.  http://www.homebrewing.org/AIH-New-5-Gallon-Corny-Keg-Ball-Lock_p_5100.html

Man, that's a good price for a new 5-gallon keg.
A friend of mine just had to send one of these back...some rust on the inside. So make sure to inspect them when you get them, you may be sending them back for a replacement.

1341
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: February 17, 2015, 07:13:07 PM »

I've found a Hochkurtz 2 step infusion mash is my favorite and easiest.  I rest at 145 for 30 minutes, infuse with a gallon or so of boiling water up to 158, rest for 40 minutes. Get good efficiency, good head retention, and great attenuation (1.010-1.012). I've been thinking about doing this mash schedule for all my beers, regardless of style.

I do the same, only with full volume/no sparge.  Half of my water to mash i at 145, the other half to raise to 155-158, vorlauf, drain, boil.

I do this for all styles, but I'll alter the rest times depending on what I'm brewing.  Pales usually get 45/15, Porters get 15/45, others 30/30.

Are you measuring and adjusting ph at each step?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I don't. I measure out my total mash water, add salts/acids, then pull out (and set aside) my infusion water, which is usually 3-4qt.

1342
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: February 17, 2015, 06:49:34 PM »
I've found a Hochkurtz 2 step infusion mash is my favorite and easiest.  I rest at 145 for 30 minutes, infuse with a gallon or so of boiling water up to 158, rest for 40 minutes. Get good efficiency, good head retention, and great attenuation (1.010-1.012). I've been thinking about doing this mash schedule for all my beers, regardless of style.

1343
All Grain Brewing / Re: Small Hot Break
« on: February 11, 2015, 11:03:15 AM »
I worried about this too for a bit, but decided it doesn't really matter. I think it was probably because you brought it up to a boil too slowly or slower than you usually do (such as when you are boiling a higher volume). This is when I've gotten little hot break. But the beer turns out fine.

1344
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Horrific Infection
« on: February 11, 2015, 10:58:04 AM »
What does Brett smell and/or taste like?

1345
All Grain Brewing / Re: Pilsner Malt question
« on: February 05, 2015, 05:04:10 PM »
are you using any nutrients or copper in your boil kettle? Sulphur is more of a yeast health problem. I brew with pils in almost ever batch and it is not a problem.
Even your IPAs and such?

1346
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller All Grain Batches
« on: February 03, 2015, 06:42:05 AM »
I normally do 6 gallon batches. I did a 3 gallon on my equipment recently. Two major differences. First, my efficiency went from 79-80% normally to 71%. Not sure why, actually. I did use a base malt I have never used before. Second, the mash lost heat faster than I am used to. It dropped 5F over an hour. I think this was because there was so much empty space in my 10 gallon Rubbermaid cooler during the mash. My FG was 1005 which was dryer than I expected. I think that was from the quick dropping temp. The mash started at 150F.

But, I want to move to 3 gallon (or less). I can't keep up with 6 gallon batches with out constantly finding ways to give away beer.

I built a 3-gallon brewery when I switched to 3-gallons as my packaged batch size.  From my kettles (24 and 27 quarts) to my mash tun (5-gallon Igloo) and hot liquor back (5-gallon Igloo) to my kegs (3-gallon AEB), everything is sized for producing 3 packaged gallons of beer.

I struggled to keep my yeast bank healthy via normal strain rotation when I was brewing five packaged gallons at a time because five packaged gallons was too much beer.  I wound up having to subculture strains just to keep them alive.  Reducing my batch size to 3 gallons allows me to subculture a new slant from an old slant and propagate a starter at the same time, ensuring that all of my strains get subcultured at least once a year through normal use.  I am brewing a 3 packaged gallon (3.3 to 3.5 primary volume) batch every four to six weeks.
AEB kegs are the sh*t! Have 3 of them and really want more. I brew 4 to 4.5 gallon batches nearly every week this year...I must drink more than you do. Try to stick to 2 pints a day and a few more on weekends. Five gallons of beer is generally too much, as I start getting tired of a beer about half way through the keg and want something new. But there were also times where I wanted more of a given beer, but that was pretty rare. My issue with smaller batches is putting less beer in a 5 gallon keg and having all the head space...it's not a problem, just something about it irks me. The smaller kegs are probably the way to go, but I just can't justify spending the money.


1347
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller All Grain Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 07:06:19 PM »
For me it takes just as long to keg a batch as it did to siphon beer from the fermenter to the bottling bucket when I was bottling.  Replace bottling bucket cleaning time with keg cleaning time. 
Time saved = however long it took me to wash, bottle brush, rinse and sanitize every bottle, along with the actual filling/capping time. 
I won't say I'll never do that again, but I will say that I don't miss it. 
You're doing it wrong. 
I doubt it.  Whether you clean/sanitize 50 bottles beforehand or not, cleaning 50 bottles takes longer than cleaning 0 bottles.

Meh, this argument really has no bearing on the overall time spent packaging your beer. Bottling or kegging, like stated above, there's a good amount of maintenance either way. Kegging has a lot more complicated maintenance, frustrating at times... It's great for lagers and hoppy beers, definitely. This isn't supposed to turn into a kegging vs. bottling thing, I don't think. Just saying, each has their place and I very much disagree that kegging saves time over bottling. On packaging day, yes, but overall, I'd argue they're fairly similar in time spent.
And "cleaning and/or scrubbing bottles" is totally unnecessary, especially if you rinse them well after pouring and store them upside down.
Anyway, each has their place. I have a bit of frustration with my used kegs and getting a good seal on them for the 3.5 to 4 gallons that gets kegged. Sometimes I'll have beers carbonate mostly in a week and sometimes they're still kinda flat... It can be frustrating. Seems like there's always something. I'm sure the pros go through this crap too.

1348
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 02:05:06 PM »
For me it takes just as long to keg a batch as it did to siphon beer from the fermenter to the bottling bucket when I was bottling.  Replace bottling bucket cleaning time with keg cleaning time. 
Time saved = however long it took me to wash, bottle brush, rinse and sanitize every bottle, along with the actual filling/capping time. 
I won't say I'll never do that again, but I will say that I don't miss it. 
You're doing it wrong.  :P

1349
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:49:35 PM »
I like your technique, beersk.  Thanks for sharing.

Unfortunately, for me, I get things like spiders and centipedes that crawl into my bottles over time, paper, old yeast sediment, etc.  I can't tell you how many times I've found things in my bottles that your technique would not have caught.

But would it work about 99% of the time?  You betcha!  Yeah, it could save me a lot of time.  I'll have to give this some more consideration.....
I make sure to give the bottles I'm using a quick inspection before sanitizing. Otherwise, I see your point. Fortunately, I've never found any of that kinda crud in my bottles! HATE centipedes.... They're OH. SO. DISGUSTING.

1350
All Grain Brewing / Re: Smaller Batches
« on: February 02, 2015, 12:06:19 PM »
Given how fast I am at sanitizing bottles, the difference between 1 and 5 gallons is only a couple minutes.

Fill 5 gallon kettle half way with water/sanitizer. Take a bottle in each hand, dunk and let fill part way, cap ends with thumbs, shake, then put on bottle tree. Repeat. 5 minutes to sanitize enough bottles for 5 gallons. Twice as fast as the vinator and you don't have another crappy piece of equipment to break and deal with. My vinator broke, never worked properly, was difficult to prime, would collect too much foam from pumping sanitizer into bottles...annoying.

All the hate for bottling is unjustified. The only thing to whine about bottling over kegging that is legitimate, in my opinion, is the possibility for bottle bombs and over/under carbonation. Everything else is a moot point (as much as I hate using that term).

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