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Messages - beersk

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16
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Top Cropping crash course?
« on: July 14, 2016, 12:59:26 PM »
I always give my beers a gentle but firm stir after top cropping to keep the yeast roused. I believe this is what he meant by "beating back" the yeast.

I usually skim the brown crud when I see it forming, usually about 24 hours, then again at maybe 36 hours, and then maybe one more time before I start seeing a creamy texture to the krausen. That's when I top crop yeast to use. Anywhere between 48 and 72 hours typically. I don't get diacetyl, so it hasn't been an issue. I'm thinking that as long as the yeast looks thick and creamy, it's ready to top crop. And give it another gentle but firm stir.

+1

My last batch of bitter was split between 1318 and 1968. Both carboys were well swirled 3 days after pitching. I didn't notice any diacetyl in the final beers, and I know I've gotten it from 1968 when I haven't swirled. Fermentation temps never exceeded 70o.

I'm starting to think that diacetyl is an indicator of a need to change your process, and perhaps that doesn't mean a diacetyl rest. I've heard that German breweries don't do rests, that they are able to control fermentation temps/yeast health to the point that the yeast will happily remove diacetyl while still at cold temps. I recently purchased CAMRA's "Brew Real Ale at Home" book, and the author mentioned rousing/beating the yeast back into suspension being a mechanism for reducing diacetyl. As homebrewers, we may always need to do diacetyl rests with lagers, but ales? I think we can nail those if we try. British brewing techniques seem to transfer to homebrew scales much more readily.

I'm considering going all open fermentation on my British beers.
I've been wanting to do nothing but top cropped beers. I don't do full open fermentations, but just leave the lid sit on top of the bucket. I snap it down after about 3 days after harvesting.
Right now I'm doing some "lager" styles with wy1007. It's just too fun to top crop and so easy to keep yeast strains going for a long time with clean healthy yeast. I even use yeast from dark beers for lighter styles because the krausen, after all the crud is skimmed, is nice and clean. It's darker, but I don't think it's a problem.

17
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Top Cropping crash course?
« on: July 14, 2016, 11:35:18 AM »
I always give my beers a gentle but firm stir after top cropping to keep the yeast roused. I believe this is what he meant by "beating back" the yeast.

I usually skim the brown crud when I see it forming, usually about 24 hours, then again at maybe 36 hours, and then maybe one more time before I start seeing a creamy texture to the krausen. That's when I top crop yeast to use. Anywhere between 48 and 72 hours typically. I don't get diacetyl, so it hasn't been an issue. I'm thinking that as long as the yeast looks thick and creamy, it's ready to top crop. And give it another gentle but firm stir.

18
Got off work early today. Brewing a Best Bitter.

3 gallons; 1044 OG
4# Maris Otter
0.25# C60
25 IBU EKG @ 60
10 IBU EKG @ 10
0.25# Honey @ flameout
WLP041 Pacific Ale

Accidentally had 0.7 extra gallons pre boil. Had to add an extra 45 minutes to the boil. :)



Sounds nice.

I'm brewing an all Vienna pale ale.

5.25g
10# Vienna
1oz Cascade 60 min
1oz Chinook 10 min
1oz Simcoe 5 min
1007 top cropped from recent batch

Going to brew it low DO (ducks from barrage of slander).
Looks like a good beer. I can't imagine low DO right now. My process already seems overly complex. I am waiting for others to chart the low DO waters and report back with experiment results.
My process improvement might just become lowER DO. My reasoning is, like on the cold side, the less O2 pickup the better.
I know bittering with Cascade seems weird in this recipe, not sure why I chose that...I might change it to Chinook.

I like the idea of swapping the cascade and chinook which would mean less chinook to meet your IBU goal. This thought is based solely upon my frugality and habit of using higher alpha hops for bittering...
True, I might just cut the Cascade altogether because I like Chinook a lot. Nice piney hops to go with toasty malt character of the Vienna. Could be good.

Tommy, I'm (maybe not so) ashamed to admit that I don't have a pH meter yet. I'm trying to keep things simple as much as possible. I know, I'm limiting myself by not having one, but for now, I'm dealing with it.

19
Got off work early today. Brewing a Best Bitter.

3 gallons; 1044 OG
4# Maris Otter
0.25# C60
25 IBU EKG @ 60
10 IBU EKG @ 10
0.25# Honey @ flameout
WLP041 Pacific Ale

Accidentally had 0.7 extra gallons pre boil. Had to add an extra 45 minutes to the boil. :)



Sounds nice.

I'm brewing an all Vienna pale ale.

5.25g
10# Vienna
1oz Cascade 60 min
1oz Chinook 10 min
1oz Simcoe 5 min
1007 top cropped from recent batch

Going to brew it low DO (ducks from barrage of slander).
Looks like a good beer. I can't imagine low DO right now. My process already seems overly complex. I am waiting for others to chart the low DO waters and report back with experiment results.
My process improvement might just become lowER DO. My reasoning is, like on the cold side, the less O2 pickup the better.
I know bittering with Cascade seems weird in this recipe, not sure why I chose that...I might change it to Chinook.

20
Got off work early today. Brewing a Best Bitter.

3 gallons; 1044 OG
4# Maris Otter
0.25# C60
25 IBU EKG @ 60
10 IBU EKG @ 10
0.25# Honey @ flameout
WLP041 Pacific Ale

Accidentally had 0.7 extra gallons pre boil. Had to add an extra 45 minutes to the boil. :)



Sounds nice.

I'm brewing an all Vienna pale ale.

5.25g
10# Vienna
1oz Cascade 60 min
1oz Chinook 10 min
1oz Simcoe 5 min
1007 top cropped from recent batch

Going to brew it low DO (ducks from barrage of slander).

21
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 13, 2016, 07:15:47 PM »
Absolutely. With you 100% here. But I'm trying it out. If I don't notice positive differences I'm going to say fvck it. But I'm also not going to completely discount it because I'm probably doing something wrong. I truly believe there's merit to it. But whether it's worth it to go "all in" on, is the question. I'm happy with all my beers except helles. Again, makes me wonder...


Yeah, I feel the same. I believe in the concept because excellent breweries wouldn't be wasting time and $ implementing it for no reason. The question is to find out if I can implement it in a way that is feasible, reasonable time-wise, and makes noticeably better beer.
I have to believe that every little bit counts. Even if you aren't all in, I'd think it makes a positive difference. I'm hoping for that at least.

22
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 13, 2016, 06:59:41 PM »
Yes, but those traditional beers of 100+ years ago likely didn't taste like they taste today. There is merit to it...

And I've read some people not wanting to put "additives" into their beers. If you use irish moss, whirlflock, gelatin, etc. you're putting additives in your beer that aren't necessary. Tired of reading about that. Sulfites are used for wine, why not beer too?
I guess I'm not crazy about the idea, but if it works, it works.



EDIT: To clarify, I'm sure LODO does something. I'm just not yet sure that it does something I care enough about to implement. Yet. Time will tell, and meanwhile I'm going to RDWAHAHB.
Absolutely. With you 100% here. But I'm trying it out. If I don't notice positive differences I'm going to say fvck it. But I'm also not going to completely discount it because I'm probably doing something wrong. I truly believe there's merit to it. But whether it's worth it to go "all in" on, is the question. I'm happy with all my beers except helles. Again, makes me wonder...

23
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 13, 2016, 12:23:02 PM »
I see it as still being a wash. Some European brewers perform LODO, others do not but still have that fresh grain field at night "it" aroma. (I'm looking at you, Pilsner Urquell...)

Add to that the fact that I don't like using more additives in my beers than I have to, and I have absolutely  no interest in any of the methods currently being described.

Do you know which ones?  I'd like to look into it, but haven't been able to find any info.

I should have stated "Some European brewers are said to use LODO." IIRC that one German textbook was a source for this statement, but I could be incorrect.

I'd rather be the guy making a great lager the traditional way, complete with HSA, than chasing after possible straws. I'm going to let things settle out before I worry about this any more.
Yes, but those traditional beers of 100+ years ago likely didn't taste like they taste today. There is merit to it...

@brewinhard, I don't know, the malt seems stale to me. It might be water, but I'm doubting that. It's just missing that fresh grain character that I'm after. I'm definitely going to give low DO brewing a shot to my fullest extent to see if I notice an improvement. The improvement is said to be so night and day that blind tastings aren't necessary. I don't know and don't care much about that. If I notice the beer is better than I've ever brewed it, then I see it as an improvement. And knowing what "it" tastes and smells like will only help me identify whether the process improvement was worth it.


And I've read some people not wanting to put "additives" into their beers. If you use irish moss, whirlflock, gelatin, etc. you're putting additives in your beer that aren't necessary. Tired of reading about that. Sulfites are used for wine, why not beer too?
I guess I'm not crazy about the idea, but if it works, it works.

24
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 13, 2016, 05:45:39 AM »
I've never even gotten it fresh here in the US. And in green bottles...no bueno.

Process-wise, much debate over that... brew with degassed water, keeping dissolved O2 low throughout process, step mash 30 minutes at 145F, raise to 162F for 30-60 minutes. Boil 60 minutes, chill to 45F, ferment at 48F for a week or so. Raise to 60F for a day or two, then keg or drop it down slowly to the 30's and lager.

You'll have many different opinions on this.

Is that what Jever does?
Does anyone know what Jever does? This is what I would do.  And I'll bet Jever does at least 50% of that.

Not trying to be argumentative or derail the thread, but I've stopped following those threads.  Are people making better beer following this process?  Is there any consensus?  Or is it still a hotly debated theory?  Just curious.  I have some lagers planned for my line up but I don't really plan to follow this method anyway.
They claim they're better, yes; fresher malt character. I believe it. But I'm trying it out for myself to see if there's a difference. I still have yet to get a spunding valve though, so that might be the kicker for me right now. Can't hurt to try it, is all I'm saying. There's been a lot of push back on it that I don't understand. Try it or don't. That simple. Jury's still out for me.

But I think the main point is: if you like the beer you're making now, your way, stick to it. But, like me, I'm not very happy with my lighter styles after fresh ingredients, pH control with Bru'n water, fermentation temp control; I'm looking for an improvement in my process...this might just be it.
I've got a 2.5 gallon batch of helles on tap now that was fermented in a keg, close transferred to a purged 2.5 gallon keg and it just tastes stale to me...shouldn't have been any O2 pickup in the transfer... makes me wonder, ya know?

Alright, back to the thread at hand! Sorry OP.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: July 12, 2016, 12:20:41 PM »
Badass! So jealous. I'll get there someday.

26
Equipment and Software / Re: New Mill Rollers
« on: July 12, 2016, 09:37:53 AM »
I returned my Barley Crusher to have the rollers replaced last year.
The only cost to me was the shipping to them.
They paid the cost of the return shipping.

The mill works better now than it did when it was new.
How long did it take before you got it back from them?

It took about 4 weeks from the time I shipped it until I got it back.

And, Jeff, yes I flipped the roller around; several times now over the last couple years.

I'm thinking it took about about 3 weeks.  It was a while ago so I'm a bit fuzzy.

In terms of warranty, it has a lifetime warranty and pretty much everything that can go wrong with it is a "wear and tear" issue.  BC was happy to repair, I was happy to have it repaired.  Seemed like a good outcome.

Paul
Good to know, thanks! I'll be sending mine in at some point, for sure. It's a no brainer.

27
Equipment and Software / Re: New Mill Rollers
« on: July 11, 2016, 01:46:58 PM »
Bought my Barley Crusher back in 2011, just replaced the rollers a month ago. New rollers fixed all my crushing problems. I will not hesitate to replace them a lot sooner if/when it starts acting up. I fought issues for way longer than I should have.

I did not do it under the "warranty" as I figured that the rollers are technically a wear item. Eventually they will dull and it's not a manufacturing defect. I didn't feel right asking them to replace it for free. I figured a $50 investment over 5 years is more than reasonable.
Well it is under warranty, so you shouldn't have to pay anything. I've put up with my milling issues for far longer than I should have as well. I may send in mine in, like, November or something. Probably should sooner than later, but I don't want to wait a month. Suppose I could borrow a friend's mill.

28
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 11, 2016, 01:42:48 PM »
For a start, use the boiled Jever water profile from Brunwater.  This may also be of help....https://byo.com/mead/item/1183-northern-german-pils-style-profile
Interesting that the picture they have in that article looks like a Vienna lager rather than a pilsner.

And it's probably not a wild a$$ guess, but more of an educated guess.

29
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 11, 2016, 09:00:03 AM »
I've never even gotten it fresh here in the US. And in green bottles...no bueno.

Process-wise, much debate over that... brew with degassed water, keeping dissolved O2 low throughout process, step mash 30 minutes at 145F, raise to 162F for 30-60 minutes. Boil 60 minutes, chill to 45F, ferment at 48F for a week or so. Raise to 60F for a day or two, then keg or drop it down slowly to the 30's and lager.

You'll have many different opinions on this.

Is that what Jever does?
Does anyone know what Jever does? This is what I would do.  And I'll bet Jever does at least 50% of that.

30
Beer Recipes / Re: Jever Clone
« on: July 11, 2016, 05:48:52 AM »
I've never even gotten it fresh here in the US. And in green bottles...no bueno.

Process-wise, much debate over that... brew with degassed water, keeping dissolved O2 low throughout process, step mash 30 minutes at 145F, raise to 162F for 30-60 minutes. Boil 60 minutes, chill to 45F, ferment at 48F for a week or so. Raise to 60F for a day or two, then keg or drop it down slowly to the 30's and lager.

You'll have many different opinions on this.

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