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Messages - Slowbrew

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1
Equipment and Software / Re: Brew Guru App.
« on: September 22, 2016, 12:26:29 PM »
It runs on my Droid Turbo fine.  The little bit I've played with it seems like it may be useful when out on the road.

One annoying thing it does is notify me every time I go past Granite City Brewery.  Which is everyday on the way to and from work.  Am I just missing how to turn off notifications or is there no way to do it?

Paul

2
Equipment and Software / Re: Keg Post Won't Come Off
« on: September 13, 2016, 03:45:56 AM »
Looking at the teeth that are left on it (it might just be the picture) I would replace it once I got it loose.  Some of them look to be ground down to almost nothing.

The suggestions give so far are all good ones.


Good luck with it.

Paul

3
Equipment and Software / Re: Fermenter Recommendations
« on: September 09, 2016, 12:06:56 PM »
Interesting idea. 

A conical that you can see into might ease the fears of some on how to dump the trub and yeast off without losing too much beer.  I admit it's one of questions I've always had (more of a "Hmmm" than a fear for me).

I'm still not in the market but I kind of like the idea.

Paul

4
The Pub / Re: Realizing a dream
« on: September 08, 2016, 01:45:01 PM »
Harley Davidson sure does make some beautiful machines, but as someone who purposefully lives on what I would hope to be a quiet country road, I wish they would stop using faulty mufflers!  ;)

I really like the tone rather than the volume.  However, I was going for performance (103.5" bore, head work, cams) and unfortunately noise comes with a free-flowing engine.  That is why the drag strips are so loud.  Mine is on the loud side but not painful, and I hope not obnoxious, though I'm sure it is to some.  No worries though, I'll be by you in a second.  ;)

Oh!  114 ft. lbs of torque, and 105 hp.  Dyno-tuned by a pro!

Sorry, Erik got me going.  I'll stop.  NO ONE bring up ham radio.  I can put you to sleep faster than my bike will go on that topic!
Not that any of us bores anyone talking about homebrewing...
I know there are good reasons for the noise and I think they sound cool but some go too far and obviously are trying to be loud. Honestly, I don't know how they stand it. Unfortunately there is a spot down the road from me that is a bit of a destination so during the summer when I am out gardening or relaxing and the only sounds on my little back road should be birds and pollinators I often hear Harleys, some of which are very noisy driven by men over compensating for who knows what. I'm not trashing most riders but some are pretty annoying.

I don't usually have a problem with the sound of a Harley.  I wonder how some of those guys can hear anything after riding their bike but that's not my problem. 

The only bike that ever really bothered me was the neighbor across the alley from a house I rented in Lincoln, NE.  He would light his soft tail up every morning at 4AM and then spend 10 minutes trying to get it warm enough to idle.   >:(  Ten minutes of rumbling straight pipes every morning before sunrise is not a way to be a good neighbor.  I have to admit I was not too upset when he laid it down on "O" street and totaled it (luckily he wasn't hurt).

The new bike is a beauty man!  Take care of it.

Paul

5
Equipment and Software / Re: Fermenter Recommendations
« on: August 26, 2016, 10:38:24 AM »
That's weird...I don't have any trouble wiht the lids on mine.  Must be a different brand.

Or you've just got powerful hands...

Or I've broken too many parts of my hands over the years and/or I'm doing it wrong.  8^(

The buckets I currently have use lids that look like paint bucket or 5 gallon drywall mud buckets.  They seal well but are a bear to remove.

Paul

6
Equipment and Software / Re: Fermenter Recommendations
« on: August 25, 2016, 12:40:36 PM »
I have 2 problems with conicals, both related to cost.  I frequently have 3-5 batches fermenting at a time and that many conicals would be expensive.  As would a way to control fermemtation temp.

I understand that.  The only time (maybe twice) that I ever used a bucket to ferment was when I ran out of carboys and better bottles.

Unfortunately these days I don't brew as often, so I've rarely got more than two batches going at once.

But I still think the stainless brew buckets look pretty cool.

They do, but $$$

For the first time ever this past Spring I had 4 beers in fermenters at one time.  Two 6.5 gallon glass carboys and 2 buckets.  I've always liked the glass but am very, very, careful with them. 

The buckets work well but I always feel like I'm fighting the lids when I have open them.  I know that is a kind of whiny reason but it's mine.   ;)

I also admit to enjoying lifting the covers on my glass carboys and being able to see the activity.  It's easy and convenient to see how the process is going without have to fight to get the lid off.  I'm apparently too cheap (or forgetful) to buy the lid removal tool.  I don't dry hop very often so the narrow neck isn't much of a problem for me.

Paul

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Step Mash Batch Sparging?
« on: August 25, 2016, 12:31:13 PM »
I don't think they are specifying a step mash.  They are simply following the normal process of a single infusion fly sparge recipe.

A "step mash" is generally something like 20 minutes at 128f, raise to 142f for 15 minutes then raise to 152F for 25 minutes.  All followed by a rise to 170F for 10 minutes to Mash Out.  (Those temps are random numbers and not any kind of real recommendation.)

Like Denny said, the mash out isn't required with batch sparging due the quick process of dumping 2 batches of water through the mash and done.  Fly sparging is a slower process and it is necessary to shutdown the enzymes during the sparging process to keep the wort from becoming too thin (no body).  Raising the temp to 170F for 10 minutes will denature the enzymes that convert the starch to sugar.

Your wort from a batch sparge will be boiling before you'd be done with the vorlauf on a fly sparge.   ;D

Paul

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Resume boil a week later
« on: August 18, 2016, 08:10:00 AM »
I've had both lacto and mold in iced tea and lemonade before. They usually don't become pronounced for 2-3 weeks, but you can start to taste a twang from the lacto (more in the aftertaste at first).

Before anyone asks, I grew up on a farm where people took water jugs filled with various beverages out on tractors every day (and sometimes forgot them).

Let's just say that whether left refrigerated or not, time is not kind to these things.

There are lots of opportunities for unique infections on the farm.  Exactly what you run into has to do with what kind of farm you run.  Some really interesting things can get started in a livestock barn.  8^)

I have to admit the jump to botulism after my first post was unexpected but really made me chuckle when I read it.  Some parts of the world must be more dangerous than others.   ;D

I'm happy I have never faced this dilemma myself.

Paul

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Resume boil a week later
« on: August 16, 2016, 10:24:54 AM »
You could have picked up an infection but assuming you've kept it reasonably cold and sealed up after transfer it likely won't be too bad.  You plan to bring it back up to a boil which should kill off any infection.

You may lose a bit sugar to any bugs that took hold and possibly pickup some extra flavors but I don't know that I would too concerned.

Heck!  It will still be beer and you may get something very good and unique along with a story to tell.  You never know.

Paul

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Adding bourbon to homebrew
« on: August 05, 2016, 12:48:45 PM »
I've only done it once.  I just added bourbon to taste and kegged it. 

If you want more wood character, chips would help you get there.

Paul

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dedicated home-brew supply store?
« on: August 05, 2016, 07:45:10 AM »
Here in the Des Moines area we have an excellent LHBS called Beer Crazy.  The folks who work there brew and make wine and they have cheese making supplies too.  It has most everything you need or want.  Their prices are reasonable for a local shop and I get most of my supplies there.  It's really nice that it is on my route home and only a block off the main road and only about 1.5 miles from my house.  They pride themselves on having every beer that can be sold in Iowa on the shelf and sell by the bottle in mix/match packs so no having to buy a six pack of something you just want to try.

We have (had?) another shop in town called Heartland Homebrew that is (was?) in Valley Junction.  He got us through a time when all the shops in town were going out of business.  I haven't been there in years so I'm not sure he is still open.  He always had a great selection and good prices.

Paul

12
What's next, debunking the sea monkey aeration?

I saw the South Park episode on what can happen in a Sea Monkey tank.  Not worth the risk of nuclear war if you ask me.   8)

I tried it a couple of times after BYO had an article on saying it seemed to work.  I never saw any difference over my normal (pretty awful) brewing technique at the time so I walked away from it.  Good to know it doesn't work.

Thanks!

Paul

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Location of Grain Storage
« on: August 04, 2016, 10:36:02 AM »
I store my grain in the same room I brew.  I also mill in the same area.  My woodworking shop doubles as my brew house so I just turn on the whole room dust filter while I measure and grind the grain.  I also put a 4" dust collection port on my mill table and connect my 2 stage dust collector to it while running the mill.  As you might imagine I don't see much grain dust.   ;D

Now if I could just get the system to collect the saw dust and wood chips as well as it gets the grain dust, I'd be set.   ???

Paul

14
when I have seen those colors on a bunch of Chinese made LED flood lights the color code I found was:

brown = Hot
blue = Neutral
green with yellow stripes = Ground

The white may be ground? 

I would have to follow up with the manufacturer to know for sure. 

That or use a volt/ohm meter to tone out what wire goes to what blade on the plug.  Wide blade is neutral, Narrow blade is hot and the third (round) blade is ground.

Hope this helps (at least a little).

Paul

Brown/Blue/Green-yellow stripe are standard UK wiring colours.

Good to know.  I guessed it was standard somewhere but hadn't tried to look it up.

Thanks!

Pual

15
when I have seen those colors on a bunch of Chinese made LED flood lights the color code I found was:

brown = Hot
blue = Neutral
green with yellow stripes = Ground

The white may be ground? 

I would have to follow up with the manufacturer to know for sure. 

That or use a volt/ohm meter to tone out what wire goes to what blade on the plug.  Wide blade is neutral, Narrow blade is hot and the third (round) blade is ground.

Hope this helps (at least a little).

Paul

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