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Messages - Slowbrew

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1291
The Pub / Re: Northern Brewer... shipping... Argh.
« on: September 21, 2012, 06:22:54 PM »
Back in April I got a full sack of pils from NB because of the flat-rate shipping. I'm pretty sure they lost money on that deal, and I'm not surprised they discontinued the program.

Not that it matters now, I thought bags of grain were excluded from the flat rate shipping.  Probably would have ordered some from them if I had know sacks were included.

Paul

1292
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Homebrew Store in Alabama Raided
« on: September 21, 2012, 02:03:33 PM »
Sounds like the opposition to passing home brewing legislation is trying to build support.  I don't live in AL so this is just me talking but it wouldn't surprise me to hear this used as reason to block passage of the bill that almost made through the next time it comes up. 

Paul


1293
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: green beer one can live with
« on: September 20, 2012, 03:37:00 PM »
He only had a minute-thirty to explain the whole process so it makes sense that skipped a few details.  If he believes the gas produced by fermentation can be burned it would be fun to watch him try and light it.   ;)

Every livestock farm on the planet produces methane.  When not managed properly they become extremely aromatic.  The basic concept behind the bio-digester is compost in a contained environment.  If you have ever seen the big eternal flame that burns at your cities waste treatment plant you have seen this process in action.  They are burning off the methane from the waste.

It's a great idea actually.  Japan has been building methane capture systems into their landfills for decades.  If you have ever played a round of golf in Japan you probably were walking around on one.

Paul

1294
Events / Re: ARRRR, Mateys
« on: September 19, 2012, 06:49:39 PM »
Shiver me timbers!  Thanky you for the reminder.  I twould of completely forget 'cept for ye.

Paul

1295
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Canning/Bottling in mason jars??
« on: September 17, 2012, 06:45:52 PM »
Canning jar related question here: I've got a couple yeast starters going in gallon jugs that I want to put away inthe fridge and not worry about for a while. Probably going to put them in jars but what's the best way to sterilize jars/lids? Just boil, cool and pour the yeast in? I obviously can't get the yeast hot enough to vacuum seal it.

Ideas?

I used to keep yeast slurry in 1 pint mason jars and never had any problems with pressure.  Apparently sloppy sanitation some where along the line is why I stopped using them.  I got some bug in my yeast bank and had to pitch it all out.

I've never played with mason jars as growlers.

Paul

1296
According to Dictionary.com:

brew·mas·ter/ˈbro͞oˌmastər/
Noun:   
A person who supervises the brewing process in a brewery.

So technically, we are all brew masters in our own brewery.  I think most people assume the name is an earned rank of some kind.  I don't refer to myself as a brew master but rather as a brewer (or hack with dumb luck  ;) ).  If others call me a brew master while drinking my beer, I don't correct them.

Paul

1297
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The new apartment dilemma
« on: September 12, 2012, 06:09:57 PM »
It's not as convenient and likely more expensive but are there any "Brew on Premise" places within a reasonable distance?  You could do the boil there and add the yeast at home.

Paul

1298
The Pub / Re: song title game
« on: September 10, 2012, 08:42:01 PM »
Long, Long Way From Home - Foreigner

1299
All Things Food / Re: Soft Beer Pretzel
« on: September 10, 2012, 08:25:29 PM »
So no info on how to stuff a pretzel or if the lye crystals measure out the same as the lye in Jeff Renner's recipe?  Some one has to have some ideas!

I found this on Food Network.  I can't speak to how well it works for making a stuffed pretzel.  http://www.foodnetwork.com/how-to/how-to-make-stuffed-pretzels/pictures/index.html

I haven't used lye so I can't answer that one.

Paul

1300
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Cleaning lines
« on: September 10, 2012, 08:19:01 PM »
I would replace them with new beer and gas lines.  Then you can just clean the connectors.  Trying to get what ever 10 year gunk is dried in them cleaned is more work than it's worth.  Plastic tubing is cheaper than cleaning solvents. 

I would replace all the o-rings too, if it were me. 

Congratulations on getting the kegs!!

Paul

1301
All Things Food / Re: Advice for getting a smoker
« on: September 07, 2012, 09:56:14 PM »
I've been using a Weber 22" kettle for about a year.  Weber makes baskets that fit perfectly in their kettles to hold the coals in a controlled space (you've probably seen them) that work very well.  I usually use one - not both. 

To keep the initial temp down I use lump charcoal and put a 1" or so layer of unlit lump in the bottom of the basket.  Then I light a very small amount of charcoal so it is completely ash covered.  When I say a small amount I mean somewhere around 1.5 to 2 hand fulls, tops.  Once everything is warmed up and the meat is on the grill, add the soaked wood chips on to the coal.  The combination of lit/unlit coal and the wood chips burning (sooner or later) keeps the temp about right.  I might have to add some additional coal after 3.5 to 4 hours. 

You can get a really good smoke in a Weber Kettle but you won't be doing huge amounts of meat at a time.  It's a fairly cheap way to try your hand at smoking and not end up with something you can't really use for other tasks if you don't enjoy the process.

Paul

Paul,
Does adjusting the vent (both the top and the bottom) help control the burn rate and temp?  If so, how do you set yours for a long slow, lowish temp cooking session?

My kettle has one vent on top and one on bottom.  I set the bottom 3/4 or more closed and the top on is 2/3 closed.  It has enough leaks to keep the coals going.

Paul

1302
The Pub / Re: Kia Sorento
« on: September 07, 2012, 08:01:55 PM »
On another note, the clutch in my truck started slipping last night.  One of the other perks of owning a manual transmission.   ::)  I really shouldn't complain after 11 years and 77K miles out of one clutch but it's hard not to mumble a bit.

Paul

Guess I got lucky.  My 1998 Honda Civic has 225K on the original clutch.

It mostly depends on who is driving.  77K is premature for a clutch to slip.

Vehicle weight and what you use it hall around has a bit to do with it.  I've had light cars with clutches last 250k+.  My full size pickup/work horse gets a bit more beat up that my old Corolla.  Teaching kids to use a clutch doesn't really help either.  (For the record, second set of tires and one set of brakes.  She's just a baby yet.)

The good thing is it is only slipping under heavy stress.  Driving to my desk job doesn't cause that much anymore so it will last awhile yet.

Paul

1303
All Things Food / Re: Advice for getting a smoker
« on: September 07, 2012, 04:32:36 PM »
I've been using a Weber 22" kettle for about a year.  Weber makes baskets that fit perfectly in their kettles to hold the coals in a controlled space (you've probably seen them) that work very well.  I usually use one - not both. 

To keep the initial temp down I use lump charcoal and put a 1" or so layer of unlit lump in the bottom of the basket.  Then I light a very small amount of charcoal so it is completely ash covered.  When I say a small amount I mean somewhere around 1.5 to 2 hand fulls, tops.  Once everything is warmed up and the meat is on the grill, add the soaked wood chips on to the coal.  The combination of lit/unlit coal and the wood chips burning (sooner or later) keeps the temp about right.  I might have to add some additional coal after 3.5 to 4 hours. 

You can get a really good smoke in a Weber Kettle but you won't be doing huge amounts of meat at a time.  It's a fairly cheap way to try your hand at smoking and not end up with something you can't really use for other tasks if you don't enjoy the process.

Paul

1304
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Open air fermentation
« on: September 07, 2012, 11:52:35 AM »
I read the question as "controlled open fermetation" not "wild yeast fermentation".  BYO's article did a very good job on how to get a wild fermentation started.

Buckets will workk better than carboys in my opinion.

Paul

1305
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: homebrew turning black
« on: September 06, 2012, 05:51:46 PM »
I'm not completely sure it would help but can you attach a photo of the beer and the environment you are storing it in?

It might help trigger an idea for somebody on the board to see what you are looking at.

Paul

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