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Messages - dbeechum

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1981
Beer Recipes / Re: Prohibition Ale
« on: May 28, 2010, 09:56:18 AM »
If you're really wanting a prohibition ale (and I'll confess, not entirely certain what that would be except an ale version of a Pre-Pro lager)

Drop the honey and drop the hops you've got there. Neither Cascade nor Summit would have been around back then. If you want truly old school Americano then you want ot use Cluster and maybe some American "noble" variant.

1982
The Pub / Re: I want the ole '50's '60's CARS back!!
« on: May 28, 2010, 09:50:38 AM »
I'm an old Mustang guy myself. The closest I've ever come to grand theft auto was a few years back when I was teaching a brewing lesson and realized the car detailer and stereo/alarm installer next door had a beautifully restored 68 GT500 sitting in their fenced backlot. Oh just to be able to drive the beast for a while.

Having said that as mentioned, ouch the fuel, wow the performance of modern cars and as a much as it makes me feel like I'm losing my recklessness of youth - yikes the relative safety of those cars versus today's cars. Sure the old car might have more of a chance of walking away successfully from a bad crash, but you don't.

1983
All Things Food / Re: AMERICAN cuisine
« on: May 27, 2010, 08:34:07 PM »
Does that mean we can now say that Budweiser is a Belgian or Brazilian beer?

1984
All Things Food / Re: AMERICAN cuisine
« on: May 27, 2010, 07:07:56 PM »
No country can touch our Doritos, Potato Chips, or Cheese curls.

I dunno, I'm kinda partial to Walker's Onion and Bacon Flavored Crisps.

1985
All Things Food / Re: AMERICAN cuisine
« on: May 27, 2010, 10:46:25 AM »
I'll proffer the things that have come out of my current home town for American cuisine (my real hometown hasn't contributed much except some football players and indoor foliage)

- The chili size - Take a bowl, add some chili, add a griddle cooked hamburger patty, add more chili and cheese. Serve - an LA classic
- The French Dip - Hotly contested between two locations here in downtown - the French Dip was invented either at Phillipes, which is a funny old fashioned place to go grab a bite, or Cole's Pacific Electric Buffet. For my money, I prefer Phillipes and their devil mustard.
- The "LA" Chili Dog - There's a variant of hot dog chili that seems to be about 1/3 flour, meat, fat and tomatoes. Very smooth stuff, unlike any other chili I've seen on dogs. Best seen at Cupid's, Flooky's or Pink's (if you feel like waiting in line forever) (LA actually had a very interesting hot dog subculture)
- The BBQ Chicken Pizza - Invented by Ed LaDou while he worked at Spago's with Wolfgang Puck. Ed passed away sudddenly a couple years ago, but his little place Caioti Pizza Cafe still makes rocking pizzas and they have a salad called "The Salad" that some folks swear by to induce labor.

There are a few others, but how about the big mammer jammer that has unfortunately seated itself deep into the roots of the world.

- The Drive Through and the Fast Food Restaurant - McDonald's was born out in San Berdoo as was the drive through window at In n Out Burger (seriously fantastic fast food burger) Carl's Jr (owner of Hardee's as well), El Pollo Loco, Fatburger, Foster's Freeze, Green Burrito, Hot Dog on a Stick, H. Salt Fish & Chips, Jack in the Box, Johnny Rockets, Weinerschinitizel, Original Tommy's (oh god, the chili and grease), Panda Express, Taco Bell, Tastee Freez, Wetzel's Pretzels, wInchell's Donuts (and its owner Yum-Yum Donuts). - all LA region started fast fooderies that have been clogging everyone's arteries for a while now. Go LA! :)

1986
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Yeast Hulls (the brown powder)
« on: May 27, 2010, 10:16:10 AM »
Yeast hulls are a primary ingredient in most yeast nutrients (along with other fun things like zinc, DAP, uric acid, etc)

When I'm brewing, I almost always add a dose of nutrient to the beer, even though I'm doing all-grain and mostly all-malt beers (ok, my Belgians tend to have a ton of sugar in them, but hey)

1987
I'm not on one of the crews that got laws changed recently, but I have been watching pretty closely. The support the AHA provides is multi-part: helping direct groups to appropriate contacts (say the Small Brewers Guild for that state, others who are running similar groups, etc.), helping advise on what sort of pitfalls are out there (aka try and get the distributors on your side early or they'll torpedo the bill out of concerns of it mucking with their status) and probably the biggest one is Gary's direct involvement in testifying before various state legislatures and being an all around homebrewing spokesman to various media outlets when they pick up the story about the legislative effort.

As for a homebrewer's defense fund, I don't know if it's ever even come up. I think in most places where homebrewing is illegal, it ends up being a ticket-able misdemeanor. The last time I even heard of a homebrewer getting in trouble was Scott Oberman in Alabama when he received a visit from the state ABC after appearing in an LA Times article all about the legalization effort and showed off all of his gear, etc. Apparently, out of concern for his job-related security clearance he stopped brewing at home for at least a while, but nothing legally happened except a stern talking to.

And its really important when thinking about what the AHA does and doesn't do. There are 3 full time staffers for the AHA (Gary, Kate and Janis), a handful of people shared in part with the BA, 15 of us on the Governing Committee and approximately 20,000 of "you's"  out there. I've always run on a platform of this organization needs to be run as a member's driven group. I think just by looking at response levels to this year's GC election and the demographics survery the effects of more open communication are showing results. The reality remains that the AHA needs all of us to get things done and that's only going to be even more important as we find ways to increase member involvement. The 20k of us I fear could quickly swamp our intrepid trio!

1988
I wish that was the reason....I was caring for a dying dog.... :'(

Bummer... I've got 2 13 year cats and an 11 year old dog that I'm starting to worry about and then I've got a 5 year old dog with a propensity to eat everything, so...

1989
All Things Food / Re: AMERICAN cuisine
« on: May 26, 2010, 11:19:24 AM »
Well, here's the question - what about things that are ethnic in inspiration, but very, very much American in actual execution.

To take your example, for instance, spaghetti and meatballs as we know it: meatballs and red sauce tossed together with spaghetti is entirely an American concoction. If you tried to get that in Italy they'd look at you funny for combining two courses. (Same thing with corned beef and cabbage, pretty much everything we think is "Chinese" food and the burrito)

1990
Not to worry, by the time it's fermented, conditioned, aged, and ready to drink, it won't be summer any longer :)

Actually, just because I'm a twisted person, I'm pushing for it to ready to drink by the second week of July. Oh yeah. :)

And Denny, you know I couldn't ever do anything by the "rules"

1991
So what's the story morning glories?

I'm think RIS this weekend to have something big, rich and chewy for the summer! :)

1992
Kai,

I think that's a great way of getting the idea across.

1993
The Pub / Re: Census 2010
« on: May 22, 2010, 12:22:08 PM »
How odd.. the census forms arrived here.. I don't know 2-3 months ago, filled it out in 5 minutes and haven't heard anything since. I've seen the census workers walking the neighborhood trying to mop up the stragglers (and a friend of mine is actually doing it in another part of town)

Sounds like you just got caught in a paperwork snafu.

1994
Pellet hops store dramatically better than whole cone hops. The tighter packaging actually reduces oxygen exposure to the majority of hop material. So given the age of the hops that most of us will be able to purchase, pellets are fresher. It's also incredibly difficult to efficiently evacuate or displace oxygen from all of those nooks and crannies in a cone.

1995
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Homebrewing and children bad??
« on: May 22, 2010, 10:45:11 AM »
Yeah, I wouldn't try to lie and hide the brewing. Social service investigators like any cop learn to sniff out a lie in a hurry and typically that just makes them far less tolerant of anything else you might be doing/saying. BAsically, it makes you look like every other lying s***head they have to deal with.

Definitely make sure to have the relevant laws on hand (http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/pages/government-affairs/statutes)

Remember, this is a legal hobby and there's nothing wrong with it in moderation. Doesn't mean it won't raise eyebrows, but really, even if you get an inspector who's strictly anti-alcohol I can't help but think that same person is going to frown more heavily on illegal drug use.

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