Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - jimrod

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12
1
Is melanoiden malt like crystal or roasted malts with little fermentability? What would a good percentage be for an Irish ale?  5% max?

2
How about melanoiden malt for some color and maltiness.

3
Irish ales seem pretty simple but I've seen several recipes that have different ingredients to make them red. What is the key to a real nice red color? And a good taste?

Who has a great Irish ale recipe?

4
General Homebrew Discussion / bulk rhizome purchase.
« on: February 27, 2015, 06:29:00 AM »
Where can I go to buy 500 rhizomes at a very good price? There are hundreds of places to buy rhizomes at retail on the internet but where do you go to get a good wholesale price?

5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 16, 2015, 10:29:26 AM »
Well I changed out the "line out" post and poppet and cleaned the dip tube with no change in foam.

Do you think the dip tube is to close to the bottom forcing the beer to squeeze through causing unnecessary turbulence  ?

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 11, 2015, 11:41:35 PM »
Yes the beer is flat or mostly flat after the foam dissipates.  I think all the carbonation is in the head. 
The carbonation comes out of solution in the form of a big foamy head.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 11, 2015, 09:41:13 AM »
I tried this beer in 2 kegerators with cooling towers and a walk in fridge. Still more foam than beer. The real problem is not serving a beer with a larger head, it's that the beer de-carbonates when there is a big head.

The carbonation releases to give you a flat beer with a huge head of foam.


What causes that?

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 10, 2015, 02:20:57 PM »
The first is more foamy

9
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 10, 2015, 01:10:21 PM »
I have tried different length of hose and pressures with no results. I will try to clean out the poppet

10
General Homebrew Discussion / Here we go again with the foam question
« on: January 10, 2015, 09:53:17 AM »
Are there certain ingredients in beers or certain brewing circumstances that cause some beers to pour excessive foam? Is there something in the recipe that could be changed to avoid excessive foam in the finished product? Or is there another problem?

I've seen this question posted many times and I know all the answers by heart BUT...now it's happening to me. It is like the friction of the beer traveling though the beer line causes the CO2 to come out of solution.

I have an APA that will not pour without yielding half foam. Now here is my setup.. I have 2 taps with 8 ft. of beer line on one side and 10 ft. on the other. Both pour this beer foamy and flat. I've also tried with a cheap plastic cobra fitting. I've changed pressure, changed temperature, de-gassed, changed out all the fittings, etc.

I force carb at high psi 30 for one day and then burp and set the pressure to 14 to finish. This has worked very well for as long as I've been serving beer. BUT not with this cursed beer. Any comments?

11
All Grain Brewing / Re: Strike temps....necessary?
« on: December 30, 2014, 10:34:46 AM »
I just plucked this from the Beer Blog by BeerSmith.
http://beersmith.com/blog/2009/07/16/mashing-for-all-grain-beer-brewing/

Here’s a summary of the major enzyme groups found naturally in malted barley and their active range:

    Phytase (86-126 F) – Lowers the pH of the mash. Lowering the mash pH has a number of benefits,        though a Phytase rest is rarely used by modern brewers.
    Debranching (95-112 F) – Helps to increase the solubility of starches resulting in increased extraction for certain malts.
    Beta Glucanese (95-113F) – Breaks down the gummy heavy starches, which can help improve stability and extraction, particularly for mashes high in proteins and adjuncts such as wheat.
    Pepidase (113-131F) – Produces free amino nitrogen, which can aid in fermentation.
    Beta Amylase (131-150F) – Produces maltose, the main sugar fermented in beer.
    Alpha Amylase (154-162F) – Produces a variety of sugars, including maltose and also some unfermentable sugars. Mashing at the higher end of this range produces more unfermentables and therefore more body in the finished beer.

But it doesn't sound like any of these rests are bad?

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: Strike temps....necessary?
« on: December 30, 2014, 10:25:45 AM »
Does each hotspot add a different certain desirable characteristic to the beer? and what are they?

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Strike temps....necessary?
« on: December 30, 2014, 10:20:56 AM »
Actually that doesn't sound bad.

14
All Grain Brewing / Strike temps....necessary?
« on: December 30, 2014, 10:06:53 AM »
How will it effect the fermability of the wort if I start the mash at 75* and gradually ramp up the temperature to 150* using a HERMS system?

Does this method utilize any "rest" points?

Will there be any difference doing this or preheating the water to 168* and "mash in" to end up at 150*?

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Fast ferment7.9 conical
« on: December 30, 2014, 06:47:26 AM »
Yes, I have one. Came in the mail in early Dec. but I have not used it yet. The collection ball is pretty cool, I ordered 3 extra.

I bought it because it was a third the price of my 7.5 gal SS conical.  I only do 10 gal batches now and I needed a second conical.  I don't see how it can clog because the collection ball has a much larger port than my Stainless Steel conical. When that gets clogged the yeast can come out like a thick turd. I really wanted to use the collection balls to store yeast, the convenience alone makes it worth while for me.

The mfg says its easy to clean and I can confirm that you can get your whole arm in the vessel. I'll let you all know how I like it after the next batch. I've been doing a lot of lagers with my 15 gal Sabco fermenter (cheap home made copy) because it fits in my extra keggerator that is temp controlled. This Fast Ferment won't fit, its too tall, I'll use it for ale or cider batches.

The side port issue is a red herring. I never use the side port in my Stainless Conical because the manufactures always mount them too low. I always use a racking cane anyways and stop when the beer gets cloudy. If you want to install one yourself I think it would be pretty simple.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 12