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Messages - johnnyb

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16
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Trippin' about my dry hopped IPA
« on: June 30, 2015, 04:25:52 PM »
Homebrewing is a money saver only until you decide you need new/better/bigger gear.

I'd be concerned about the ants, but everything is is pretty much normal. Clean up the outside of the fermenter with a warm damp cloth.

It's definitely a money saver....




For my friends that is.

17
Equipment and Software / Re: pH Meter Calibration
« on: June 30, 2015, 03:49:57 PM »
My pH56 takes a while to get a reading too. I have a little laboratory arm to hold it. I cool the wort to under 80 in a small 40ml beaker, stick the meter probe in it, lock it in place with the arm, and go do something else for 10 minutes or so.

It doesn't take long to calibrate though. I can do that holding it in the solution. It locks in on the calibration solution way faster than on something like wort.


18
Equipment and Software / Re: Fermentation Chamber suggestions
« on: June 30, 2015, 10:04:29 AM »
Interesting suggestion Johnnyb.  I ferment in plastic carboys so I would be worried about them bursting.  I like the idea of using CO2 to eliminate oxygen though!

Paul

I use CO2 to transfer from my Better Bottles.  They won't burst, but if you over pressurize the will lift a little as the punt pushes downward.  Never had them crack or leak, but there's probably a weak spot in them now...


How much pressure did you use? I only used about 1.5 PSI and that actually forced me to keep my hands on the carboy cap to keep it from popping off. But the better bottle itself didn't seem to be under any stress at all.

19
Equipment and Software / Re: Fermentation Chamber suggestions
« on: June 29, 2015, 04:19:20 PM »
What kind of vessel do you ferment in?

I just did my first transfer using CO2 pressure to push the beer from my better bottle into the "out" side of a keg and it worked great. You could also use this method to go from one better bottle to another if you wanted to secondary.

I'm not sure how well this would work with buckets.

People do use it with glass carboys but you need to be careful since they are not made to be pressurized.


20
I would be extremely grateful if anyone can help me with this... I'm putting the finishing touches on my new chest freezer kegerator build and am confused by my temperature controller. I want to get the settings correct so I don't kill the compressor.

It's a Love TSX-10140. It has a ton of settings and I'm not clear on all of them even after reading the tech sheet that came with it and doing some online searching.

Here we go with the first group of settings that are giving me trouble...

SP = Set Point
r0 = Differential or hysteresis
r1 = Lower value for SP
R2 = Upper value for SP


So SP is self explanatory. I think r0 is the how many degrees above and below set point to kick the compressor on or off? But if that's the case, what are r1 and r2 for?


Next group of settings that are giving me trouble...

c0 = Minimum stopping time of load
c2 = ON time of fault cycle, when ambient probe is broken
c3 = OFF time of fault cycle, when ambient probe is broken
c4 = Minimum time since compressor start-up until the next stop
c5 = Minimum time since the compressor start-up until the next start-up

Anyone have a clue where I should start with these in order to prolong compressor life? Anyone know if these settings take precedence over the settings in the first group? (i.e. - if c4 = 10 minutes but the temp reaches my lower set point differential in 5 minutes, what happens?)


21
Equipment and Software / Re: Stir Plates
« on: June 29, 2015, 02:43:40 PM »
A stir plate is an unnecessary expense.  Your money is better spent on other gear.  Perform an advanced search using my user name as the poster and "stir plate" as the search term, and you will discover why a stir plate is little more than home brewing snake oil.


Do you have a sort of a single manifesto post on the subject describing why you think (maybe experimental results?) stir plates are unnecessary (potentially harmful?) and what your recommended method is without the benefit of owning an orbital shaker?

I did the search as recommended but mostly found a bunch of posts that seem to be referring to other posts that I haven't located yet.

I wish I knew about this shaker thing a few months ago. My old biotech company finally bit the dust and I'm sure I could have bought a shaker for peanuts.

See page 7 of this thread https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=21705.msg276016#msg276016
The takeaway is that Mark sees stressed, continually aerated wort as a bad thing and that a healthy pitch of the entire starter which was aerated thoroughly at the beginning and pitched at high kreusen is better.

Thanks! Read the entire thread. Very interesting.

22
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 05:02:22 PM »
Yikes, 3 grams. I was going to use 14 grams and that was on the low end of what I've seen recommended. Some people recommend more than 28 grams for a 5 gallon batch!

No way I want to use 14 grams if 3 grams is even slightly noticeable.

I'll definitely post my thoughts as I go through the process and my results.

23
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 04:34:24 PM »
Your process is exactly the one one I use, can't speak of the lacto blend you're using as I use the 5335.  2-3 days at 90 is perfect.

+1 on WY1007, great yeast and tolerates the low pH and as for salt, I've used up to 22g and got comments of a bit too salty and 15g got perhaps a bit more salt......  I use sea salt and have found that 17-18g is pretty good in a 5 gallon batch. I add the salt at 10 minutes left in the boil.

As for the malt I'm at 60-40 malt to wheat and mash at 152, last batch scored a 40. I've got an entry coming in a couple weeks with another batch so my hopes are high again!

Thanks.

I read your Gose threads and then also got some feedback from porkchop on NB forums and read everything else I could find. Your process seemed repeatable plus the bugs will only be in one of my fermenters, which is appealing as I'm still nervous about taking my first step into sours.

Sounds like I'm close on the salt. The Gose's that I've enjoyed the most you could barely tell had salt in them. I've had a few that were really salty, but that's not what I'm going for.

For some reason, I'm not sure that coriander was detectable in any that I've tried. How much do you use and how detectable is it?




24
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 04:20:09 PM »
Another funny thing about Gose is I've read information that these should have just a touch of a sour twang to them. And then I've read stuff that suggests they should be full bore sour like a Berliner.

I know the ones I've been able to try locally have not been mouth puckering sour like Berliner's are. But I do like really sour stuff!

What do you guys shoot for?

25
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 04:15:33 PM »
I've gotten to the point that I'm only using hops for dry hopping my sour beers. Some say try to keep the IBUs at 5 or less, and at that point I think "why bother at all?" Just a thought. If we are lowering hops that much because we want our lacto to kick butt, why use them at all? In a firmly soured beer I dont miss them. Then if you want some hop flavor/aroma just dry hop. Just an opinion.


With the process I'm using, I don't need to worry about hops inhibiting the lacto since they won't be added until after the lacto has done it's thing.

I'm just using bittering hops to counter any residual sweetness. I expect it to finish around 1.008-ish so it probably needs just a touch.

Now for sours where the bugs are pitched during or after fermentation, those are going to finish extremely dry, correct? I can see foregoing even small bittering additions for that type of sour.

26
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 02:29:38 PM »
US-05 will definitely work to make a fine gose, but I prefer WY 1007 (as I do for my Berliner styles as well).  It seems to ferment well in the presence of a low pH, is fairly neutral, and hell, its GERMAN!

I love that yeast for my altbier so I think I'll use it. Thanks.

27
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 02:28:09 PM »
I would hold the salt addition until final packaging. In addition, I wouldn't increase the sodium content any higher than about 250 ppm. That seems to be the 'sweet spot' for salt addition. I'm not going to evaluate your salt addition and the resulting sodium content, but do take the time to figure that out for yourself. 

Since finding out that styles like Berliner Weisse DO NOT use a majority of wheat in their grist (see Ron Pattinson's blog), I question the use of 60% wheat in this beer. I find that a high proportion of wheat makes these soured styles too bready tasting. I would reverse the percentages in this beer...40% wheat.

Thanks!

Where I'm at now works out to about 270 ppm sodium. The funny thing is I thought I was starting on the far side of the low end of the range based on everything I read. I figured I would start low and adjust if necessary. I'll cut to 250 ppm and go from there.

Surprised about the pils/wheat ratio. "Brewing with Wheat" doesn't give a ratio for Gose, but contains several references (including some very old ones) for Berliner Weisse starting at 50:50 all the way to 80% wheat.

I will search for that blog you mentioned.


28
Beer Recipes / Re: Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 02:21:02 PM »
The Omega lacto blend only needs 1-2 days at room temp, no need to keep it that hot.  Make a 1L starter, no O2, no decant.

Awesome, thanks.

What I read was one of the 2 lactos in the blend does well at lower temps but maybe not both? I was going to try and keep it up a bit higher than room temp in order to get both strains to contribute. Mostly because some people report better results with the "handful of grain" method, and they suspect it's because a pure pitch doesn't offer as much complexity. I'm hoping with the blend it will have a bit more complexity.   

29
Beer Recipes / Comments and Suggestions for Gose
« on: June 28, 2015, 06:54:44 AM »
I've been working on this at the Northern Brewer forum but thought I would post it here for additional comments. Going to brew it later this week.

Here is where I'm at so far...


Gose

5.25 gallons, 1.044 SG, 3 SRM, 8 IBU


Grains:

60% malted wheat
40% pilsen

(Go with German malts?)


Souring with Lactic:

* Perform mash as normal to collect 6.25 gallons
* Heat to 170 degrees and hold for 10 minutes
* Cool to 85 degrees and transfer to carboy that's been purged with CO2
* Acidify with lactic acid to less than pH 4.5 to give lacto head start and protect head retention
* Pitch Omega lacto blend (from starter) and purge headspace of carboy with CO2
* Put carboy in water bath with circulating pump and aquarium heater set to ~ 90 degrees
* Give it 2 or 3 days until soured to my liking
* Transfer back to boil kettle and boil for 90 minutes
* Continue as normal
* Probably have to top it up a little bit with H2O post boil (Unless I can just boil for 60 minutes?)
* Finish with US-05?

Starter for Lacto blend

* Shake it and stir plate or just cover it and let it sit?
* Crash and decant or dump the whole thing in?


Hops & Spices:

Mount Hood @ 45 fOR 8 IBU

14 grams crushed Coriander @ 5
14 grams sea salt @ 5


Finishing Yeast:

US-05 (or maybe one of the altbier of kolsch yeasts?)

* Should I cold crash the yeast out and fine when it's done? Is it supposed to stay kind of cloudy? Does my choice of finishing yeast make a difference for this? 

30
Equipment and Software / Re: Stir Plates
« on: June 28, 2015, 06:32:29 AM »
A stir plate is an unnecessary expense.  Your money is better spent on other gear.  Perform an advanced search using my user name as the poster and "stir plate" as the search term, and you will discover why a stir plate is little more than home brewing snake oil.


Do you have a sort of a single manifesto post on the subject describing why you think (maybe experimental results?) stir plates are unnecessary (potentially harmful?) and what your recommended method is without the benefit of owning an orbital shaker?

I did the search as recommended but mostly found a bunch of posts that seem to be referring to other posts that I haven't located yet.

I wish I knew about this shaker thing a few months ago. My old biotech company finally bit the dust and I'm sure I could have bought a shaker for peanuts.

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