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Messages - kgs

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1
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 02:28:37 PM »
Check "can you brew it" for Shakespeare stout

I did, it says it wasn't cloned, and someone commented it didn't have that velvety flavor. Ninkasi lists these ingredients: 2-Row Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Roasted Barley, Oats, Nugget hops. Another board mentioned using Wyeast 1968. I'm thinking of tinkering with McQuaker's to make it just a little bigger and see if that hits the mark -- a good excuse for a two-gallon BIAB experiment.

I can verify that Ninkasi uses 1968.  Other than that, Jamie is VERY tight lipped about recipes.

thanks, Denny!

2
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 02:27:18 PM »
Check "can you brew it" for Shakespeare stout

I did, it says it wasn't cloned, and someone commented it didn't have that velvety flavor. Ninkasi lists these ingredients: 2-Row Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Roasted Barley, Oats, Nugget hops. Another board mentioned using Wyeast 1968. I'm thinking of tinkering with McQuaker's to make it just a little bigger and see if that hits the mark -- a good excuse for a two-gallon BIAB experiment.

for shakespeare, I've used a mashweasel's clone attempt and tweaked it and came out with something that's probably 90% there - i've brewed it three times now and dig it.

I'll post it if you're interested.

BTW - I'm not sure I would describe Shakespeare as "not hoppy or overly roasty" in my opinion.  To me, those would be the first two words to describe it  ;)

Hmmm, I may be thinking more of Oatis then, which is on the sweet side, which I like. Go ahead and post because it will be useful to me to calibrate against.

3
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 06:28:17 AM »
Id stick with what rogue says is in it. Listen to can you brew it re-brew and they interview him and he gives the recipe.

thanks, will do. my commute-home homework for the day. :)

4
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 06:02:09 AM »
Check "can you brew it" for Shakespeare stout

I did, it says it wasn't cloned, and someone commented it didn't have that velvety flavor. Ninkasi lists these ingredients: 2-Row Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Roasted Barley, Oats, Nugget hops. Another board mentioned using Wyeast 1968. I'm thinking of tinkering with McQuaker's to make it just a little bigger and see if that hits the mark -- a good excuse for a two-gallon BIAB experiment.

5
Beer Recipes / Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 20, 2014, 10:12:24 PM »
I'm looking for a recipe that would approximate Oatis or Shakespeare -- something around 7 percent, good mouthfeel, not hoppy or overly roasty. I've done McQuaker's a couple of times and can see this as a step up.  Recipe ideas? I was looking at the Malpais Stout in Craft Beer for the Home Brewer, though not sure I could find the "Franco-Belges Kiln Coffee Malt" on a reasonable timeline.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 20, 2014, 09:44:10 PM »
I have been using BIAB for small stovetop batches. Allows me to make a 12 pack worth of beer while doing other chores (read watch tv). I would not use it for anything larger.

I can see it for that purpose. The grain would likely fit in the same bag I use for my hop spider.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 04, 2014, 10:49:40 AM »
I mash 3-gallon BIAB batches in a 5-gallon beverage cooler, and boil in my 5-gallon kettle. Fermcap is required to prevent boilovers, but otherwise it is quite manageable.

I can actually do that (I have a 5-gallon cooler I stopped using when I got a 9-gallon Coleman Xtreme) but I'm curious what I'm getting from this procedure that I don't get from my setup and process, aside from upper-arm exercise. I went no-sparge a few batches back and haven't looked back. So BIAB would be the difference between lifting a bag out of a cooler and transferring the cooler's contents into a kettle, versus opening a ball valve and draining into a kettle (I often do push the boundaries and boil 4 gallons in a 5-gal kettle using Fermcap). The bag won't magically transport its contents to the compost bin, so it needs to go somewhere, and that somewhere will need cleaning as well.

In its classic form, where the mash is in the boil kettle, BIAB seems like a low-cost method for getting into all-grain brewing (no need for ball valve, strainer, high-temp hose, cooler, etc.) but I feel like I'm missing something when I read about it.

8
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 04, 2014, 07:56:58 AM »
Water absorption is roughly .2-.25 gallons per pound of grain.
Water weighs about 8lbs per gallon.
4 lbs of wet grain will weigh 10.5-12lbs.

These are all ballpark numbers that are close enough for me.

Thank you. The water absorption is what I didn't have. Though I just thought to check if Beersmith had BIAB equipment profiles and it does, so I could have backed into an answer through the recipe. It's still really good to have this going in.  Triangulation, you know, all in the pursuit of... homebrew!

A 2.5-gallon batch using 5.5 lbs of grain: at .25 gallon absorption, that would add 1.375 gallons, or 11 pounds. That's a 16.5 lb bag. Practicing with a 20-lb bag of sugar or flour ought to give me a sense of how easy it is to hoist a bag out of the kettle.

The Beersmith "mini" BIAB profile is based on a 5-gallon kettle and a 2.91 gallon batch. But that would be almost 4 gallons of water, according to Beersmith. It sounds as if it might be wiser to use my 8-gallon kettle.

9
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 03, 2014, 07:07:10 PM »
If you know your absorption amount per pound of grain you can add that to the premash weight of the grain itself. Ought to be close enough to predict what the bag will weigh.

That's what I don't have any idea about. I could go very small as a precaution (2 gallon batch, 1.050, etc.) and then measure and report back...

10
All Grain Brewing / Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 03, 2014, 06:04:38 PM »
In the spirit of experimentation I want to brew a BIAB batch just to compare it with MIAT (mash in a tun  :P ). My primary concern going into this is the hassle of dealing with the bag post-mash--that it may be too heavy for me to deal with. Is there a method for calculating the weight of the bag? I will probably target a small batch anyway, but I thought it might be helpful to know going in what I'm dealing with and scale my recipe accordingly.

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Hop schedule for late-hopped Southern Hemisphere ale
« on: January 18, 2014, 08:30:23 PM »
Wow. Sounds great!

A 7 day re-brew?  I admire your commitment to improvement.
Sounds like you may have a winner there.  Especially with the hop schedule.

While perhaps impractical at this point, you might consider swapping up the yeast choice.
For example, how would this beer be different if fermented with Wyeast 1450?

Food for thought. 
If it was myself, with tomorrow as brewday, I might consider replicating and making more of the goodness you have created.

Yes, I think I will keep it the same, as much as anyone can do that in a homebrew. I remember brewing Denny's RypePA about 5 times straight, 4 times with really good results. There's something pleasing about being able to replicate success.

I'd like to try Wyeast 1450 sometime. Not this time :-)

12
Beer Recipes / Re: Hop schedule for late-hopped Southern Hemisphere ale
« on: January 18, 2014, 07:15:21 PM »
My favorite use for Pacific Gem is as a FWH. Brings out the woody/blackberry aroma, IMO.

I am having a tester of this 7 days after bottling (I always bottle part of the batch in 6-oz splits) and for tomorrow's rebrew I'm torn between adding a touch of hops earlier and keeping it just as it is. That late hopping is something awesome and this blend of hops is ohhhh so yummy. This is one of those batches that makes up for a lot of bad batches, crazy brew days, and so on. "Yes, *I* made this!" It's a no-sparge, late-hopped pale ale with Southern Hemisphere hops and I'm calling it Weird Quirks.  ;)

(By the way, I know the Champaign area quite well - two stints at Chanute, and later a masters degree at UIUC!)

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1 gallon fermentor cap
« on: January 16, 2014, 04:48:20 PM »
I use drilled rubber stoppers with an airlock on my one gallon batches. Yeah, the rubber stinks but in the three or so years of using them I have never had a batch that came out with any of the rubber taste or aroma in the beer. That is true even when the krausen hits the rubber or when the beer has sat under the stopper for a long time. I've had beer under one of those rubber stoppers for two years without any absorption of the rubber aroma.

But I also agree that you will be fine using the foil.

Northern Brewer sells a drilled cap for 1-gallon jugs. I keep wondering whether it has a gasket, or what.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/small-batch-1-gallon-fermenting-jug.html

14
Questions about the forum? / Re: wierd quirks
« on: January 05, 2014, 07:57:53 PM »
I'm guessing this won't be the only batch of beer with this name...

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/95138610852034205/

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: online stores and shipping
« on: January 01, 2014, 07:47:48 PM »
Thanks for the replies!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

You didn't say where in Florida, but Homebrew Den in Tallahassee was a great store when I lived there a few years back.

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