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Messages - kgs

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1
Equipment and Software / Re: 5 gallon Igloo mash tun is best for me?
« on: June 20, 2015, 10:37:28 AM »
I too brew batches around the 3 gallon size. I used a 5-gallon cooler just fine when I was sparging. About a year and a half ago I adopted a no-sparge model that works for me. Think of it as BIAB without the bag (no lifting, gravity drain into the kettle, etc.). That's when I went to a 9-gallon rectangular Coleman Xtreme, which works great for me for this purpose.

I kept the 5-gallon cooler just in case I want to sparge a batch for any reason, and it would be a three-minute job to swap out the ball valve and modified plumbing supply line. But if I were not using the no-sparge model, I would have stayed with the 5-gallon. It worked well for that purpose, and even with no-sparge there is enough space in my 9-gallon mash tun that I lose temp faster than I did in the 5-gallon. (I throw a blanket over the tun, which seems to help.)

Regarding equipment cost, I found that 5-gallon cooler on sale for $15 -- but the Home Depot version is $20 today, which seems like a good deal.

2
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 regulator to Paintball Tank Adapter
« on: June 17, 2015, 08:05:29 PM »
I've used that JacPac thing I bought maybe a total of three or four times.  I think I paid $40 for it and even that's hard to justify since I don't use it much.

It's also complicated getting the paintball tanks filled.  One of the lovely things about living in Chicago is that I cannot get paintball CO2 tanks in the city.  You need to drive way out into the hinterlands.  My local gas place wants $10 to fill a 20 oz. paintball tank, $15 for a 5 lb. tank.  Dick's will fill the small tank for a couple bucks and even free sometimes, but I have to drive 45 minutes to get there.

Having moved from San Francisco to the North Bay, things like paintball CO2 refills are not too hard (no idea what it was like in SF). Dicks' around here confessed that their CO2 had been broken for more than a month. Sports Authority assured me they could do it, no problem, and they are ten minutes away. There are other CO2 places around here as well.

3
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 regulator to Paintball Tank Adapter
« on: June 16, 2015, 07:25:07 PM »
Thanks all. This is a lot of great information. (And I like that paintball regulator... I should go for "more flexible" but it's a fascinating piece of equipment.) -- kgs

4
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 regulator to Paintball Tank Adapter
« on: June 14, 2015, 01:58:09 PM »
Here you go....https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=23158.0

Again, this was really more about the gas component, but people commented on the quality of the tank as well.

Whew, thanks. Definitely interesting thread worth thinking about.

5
Kegging and Bottling / Re: CO2 regulator to Paintball Tank Adapter
« on: June 14, 2015, 01:26:36 PM »
(Someone)  ;) posted a long thread not too long ago about CO2 tanks and the purity of gases. He came to the conclusion that the tank is the point of concern. I would read up on paintball tanks before I used them with beer. Just my .02.

I have been reading up on paintball tanks, including searching the Forum. Not sure who "someone" is, just tried another search, etc. Haven't been on forum that much while I've been in the middle of a job change, parental health crisis, household move, & progress in a doctoral program... just took a rare break to dip in for advice.

This would be a new tank that would be filled, not exchanged.

Back to studying...

6
Kegging and Bottling / CO2 regulator to Paintball Tank Adapter
« on: June 14, 2015, 11:26:09 AM »
I am finally going to start kegging. Since I brew small batches and will be using small kegs, I was thinking it might be more convenient to use paintball tanks. I know there are specialized paintball regulators and adapters, but I also see adapters that could let me scale up to regular CO2 tanks as needed:

http://www.homebrewing.org/The-Adapter-CO2-regulator-to-Paintball-Tank-Adapter_p_1122.html

http://www.amazon.com/AQUATEK-CO2-Paintball-Tank-Adapter/dp/B004M49QDC

Can I assume these work ok?

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: Cutting a Hoppy Recipe in half- Dales Clone
« on: May 08, 2015, 06:19:29 AM »
Yes, resurfacing this thread because I've been hunting for a Dale's Pale Ale recipe I felt worthy of the beer. I may switch course and brew something else (due to all kinds of things going on in my life, most good, I haven't brewed since November and only two days ago gained a brewday this weekend). The recipes I've been finding on the web feel suspect (IBUs far too low, malt bill seems off). But if anyone had a recipe they recommended, I'm game.

8
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 02:28:37 PM »
Check "can you brew it" for Shakespeare stout

I did, it says it wasn't cloned, and someone commented it didn't have that velvety flavor. Ninkasi lists these ingredients: 2-Row Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Roasted Barley, Oats, Nugget hops. Another board mentioned using Wyeast 1968. I'm thinking of tinkering with McQuaker's to make it just a little bigger and see if that hits the mark -- a good excuse for a two-gallon BIAB experiment.

I can verify that Ninkasi uses 1968.  Other than that, Jamie is VERY tight lipped about recipes.

thanks, Denny!

9
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 02:27:18 PM »
Check "can you brew it" for Shakespeare stout

I did, it says it wasn't cloned, and someone commented it didn't have that velvety flavor. Ninkasi lists these ingredients: 2-Row Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Roasted Barley, Oats, Nugget hops. Another board mentioned using Wyeast 1968. I'm thinking of tinkering with McQuaker's to make it just a little bigger and see if that hits the mark -- a good excuse for a two-gallon BIAB experiment.

for shakespeare, I've used a mashweasel's clone attempt and tweaked it and came out with something that's probably 90% there - i've brewed it three times now and dig it.

I'll post it if you're interested.

BTW - I'm not sure I would describe Shakespeare as "not hoppy or overly roasty" in my opinion.  To me, those would be the first two words to describe it  ;)

Hmmm, I may be thinking more of Oatis then, which is on the sweet side, which I like. Go ahead and post because it will be useful to me to calibrate against.

10
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 06:28:17 AM »
Id stick with what rogue says is in it. Listen to can you brew it re-brew and they interview him and he gives the recipe.

thanks, will do. my commute-home homework for the day. :)

11
Beer Recipes / Re: Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 21, 2014, 06:02:09 AM »
Check "can you brew it" for Shakespeare stout

I did, it says it wasn't cloned, and someone commented it didn't have that velvety flavor. Ninkasi lists these ingredients: 2-Row Pale, Chocolate, Crystal, Roasted Barley, Oats, Nugget hops. Another board mentioned using Wyeast 1968. I'm thinking of tinkering with McQuaker's to make it just a little bigger and see if that hits the mark -- a good excuse for a two-gallon BIAB experiment.

12
Beer Recipes / Stout - Oatis, Shakespeare, etc.
« on: May 20, 2014, 10:12:24 PM »
I'm looking for a recipe that would approximate Oatis or Shakespeare -- something around 7 percent, good mouthfeel, not hoppy or overly roasty. I've done McQuaker's a couple of times and can see this as a step up.  Recipe ideas? I was looking at the Malpais Stout in Craft Beer for the Home Brewer, though not sure I could find the "Franco-Belges Kiln Coffee Malt" on a reasonable timeline.

13
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 20, 2014, 09:44:10 PM »
I have been using BIAB for small stovetop batches. Allows me to make a 12 pack worth of beer while doing other chores (read watch tv). I would not use it for anything larger.

I can see it for that purpose. The grain would likely fit in the same bag I use for my hop spider.

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 04, 2014, 10:49:40 AM »
I mash 3-gallon BIAB batches in a 5-gallon beverage cooler, and boil in my 5-gallon kettle. Fermcap is required to prevent boilovers, but otherwise it is quite manageable.

I can actually do that (I have a 5-gallon cooler I stopped using when I got a 9-gallon Coleman Xtreme) but I'm curious what I'm getting from this procedure that I don't get from my setup and process, aside from upper-arm exercise. I went no-sparge a few batches back and haven't looked back. So BIAB would be the difference between lifting a bag out of a cooler and transferring the cooler's contents into a kettle, versus opening a ball valve and draining into a kettle (I often do push the boundaries and boil 4 gallons in a 5-gal kettle using Fermcap). The bag won't magically transport its contents to the compost bin, so it needs to go somewhere, and that somewhere will need cleaning as well.

In its classic form, where the mash is in the boil kettle, BIAB seems like a low-cost method for getting into all-grain brewing (no need for ball valve, strainer, high-temp hose, cooler, etc.) but I feel like I'm missing something when I read about it.

15
All Grain Brewing / Re: Calculating weight of BIAB grain bag
« on: May 04, 2014, 07:56:58 AM »
Water absorption is roughly .2-.25 gallons per pound of grain.
Water weighs about 8lbs per gallon.
4 lbs of wet grain will weigh 10.5-12lbs.

These are all ballpark numbers that are close enough for me.

Thank you. The water absorption is what I didn't have. Though I just thought to check if Beersmith had BIAB equipment profiles and it does, so I could have backed into an answer through the recipe. It's still really good to have this going in.  Triangulation, you know, all in the pursuit of... homebrew!

A 2.5-gallon batch using 5.5 lbs of grain: at .25 gallon absorption, that would add 1.375 gallons, or 11 pounds. That's a 16.5 lb bag. Practicing with a 20-lb bag of sugar or flour ought to give me a sense of how easy it is to hoist a bag out of the kettle.

The Beersmith "mini" BIAB profile is based on a 5-gallon kettle and a 2.91 gallon batch. But that would be almost 4 gallons of water, according to Beersmith. It sounds as if it might be wiser to use my 8-gallon kettle.

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