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Messages - kgs

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16
I've contacted Siebel to see who owns the copyright for the text.

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Note: assuming they do, don't rule out that a polite request would allow you to reproduce a few pages online. I've worked on licensing projects for books, and found that what my mother taught me ("Please and thank you are the magic words") opens a lot of doors.

My real goal is to assemble a PDF of the numerous excerpts that are referenced throughout brewing literature. One of the reasons I bought the text was out of frustration over seeing it referenced so many times and not being able to trace it back to DeClerck.

The publisher might really like that! You're doing the sort of work for a monograph that is now taken for granted for academic journals.

17
I've contacted Siebel to see who owns the copyright for the text.

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Note: assuming they do, don't rule out that a polite request would allow you to reproduce a few pages online. I've worked on licensing projects for books, and found that what my mother taught me ("Please and thank you are the magic words") opens a lot of doors.

18
Will do. My research so far says fair use but I'm playing it fast and loose by doing pictures and such long portions.


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As a librarian, I'd say so far ok, but at some point (and it's a fuzzy line) this will go beyond fair use. It's about the proportion of material used relative to the text. If it were just you and me, no problem.


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Also, based on my years in the music biz, fair use is about YOU using something, not sharing it.  In effect, you can make copies for yourself but not others.

Fair use for music has always been much more limited than for other media. For textual works, fair use is more generous. Not arguing to reinstate the photos of the book pages, but Google Books wouldn't exist without this concept of fair use (q.v. Authors Guild v. Google), nor would I be able to request an ILL of a book chapter. Nolo Press has a good discussion.

https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/fair-use-rule-copyright-material-30100.html

The phrase I recall from over the years is "systematic copying," such as the creation of coursepacks without first acquiring rights to copy the articles or chapters included in the coursepacks, which got U Georgia smacked down.

When in doubt, quote what is needed to make a point, and type it out, don't photocopy it (and of course, give it proper attribution). For one thing, that's more accessible, for people using text readers and other assistive devices (or reading on tiny phone screens).

19
I deleted all the content.

Here is the link for Siebel to purchase the text:

https://www.siebelinstitute.com/products/bookstore/a-textbook-of-brewing/

Used originals pop up on secondary markets occasionally.

Due to the fact that the reference of this book is nearly ubiquitous in all texts that followed it, if you have specific questions about references to it and can't find them, send me a PM and I'll find the references section and send it to you.


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It's not widely held in libraries, but in case yours holds it, or can get it easily/cheaply via ILL:

http://www.worldcat.org/title/textbook-of-brewing/oclc/2800288


20
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric Brew In A Can (BIAC)
« on: December 31, 2016, 09:46:37 PM »

This is very tempting because I do own a pump, and can see this taking the place of the brewstand I was thinking of building. I have several questions for them (is the thermostat adjustable, can it handle smaller batches, etc.) but I'm definitely interested. I'd also like to figure out if I would be able to lift a basket of wet grain at or near max capacity, which at 16 lbs dry would be about 30 lbs wet, if the guideline that a lb of grain absorbs .1 gallon water is correct (16 lbs grain --> 1.6 gallons water --> ca. 15 lbs; + 16 = 31 lbs).
Here is a solution to your lifting concern.

http://www.brewinabag.com/collections/frontpage/products/pulley-metal-ratchet-250-lbs-capacity

This is assuming that you are brewing in the garage or basement (or your wife will let you put a eyebolt in the kitchen ceiling).  I use one of these for BIAB, works great.

Took me some head-scratching to figure out my response. Well... I'm a wife in a two-wife household... But back to brewing... I'd prefer to find an equipment design more mobile than one requiring a fixed winch. When I can't get to sleep I mentally work on the design of a mobile, highly accessible all-electric brewstand. I ask myself,  if I had very limited mobility, how would I move grain and fluid through this process? It's an interesting workflow problem. Pumps, gravity, and placement seem important to the design.


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Oops...sorry if my attempt at humor was off :-[ ...but, as you said, back to brewing...I don't have limited mobility but I do have a bad back.  So here's what I came up with to deal with that.

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=25940.0

It's not all electric but you may get some ideas for your brewing workflow system.  I can envision a roll-around stand made out of 2x4s with big caster wheels that has a peak for the lifting tackle.  The pump should be a must.  It really saves my back and has so many uses (mash circulation, several transfer uses, whirlpool, cleaning, etc., etc.).  Also the tall roll-around cart for the fermenter.

Your humor was fine--I did laugh (like "um how do I answer this"). IMO that's the advantage of brew clubs, brewing events, and conferences -- the chance to get past our digital selves and have some face-to-face celebration of our shared belief that no matter what else happens in this crazy world, malted barley wants to become beer.

I will add the roll-around stand with a lifting tackle to my insomnia exercises. I agree on pumps--they are magic. I have one, and don't use it much right now, but every time I do I'm impressed. In my late-night musings, I am trying to deal with the hot wet grain, and I'm a bit stumped. I wonder if that means the mash tun needs to be reimagined. The lifting tackle may offer some solutions.

21
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric Brew In A Can (BIAC)
« on: December 31, 2016, 07:53:56 PM »

This is very tempting because I do own a pump, and can see this taking the place of the brewstand I was thinking of building. I have several questions for them (is the thermostat adjustable, can it handle smaller batches, etc.) but I'm definitely interested. I'd also like to figure out if I would be able to lift a basket of wet grain at or near max capacity, which at 16 lbs dry would be about 30 lbs wet, if the guideline that a lb of grain absorbs .1 gallon water is correct (16 lbs grain --> 1.6 gallons water --> ca. 15 lbs; + 16 = 31 lbs).
Here is a solution to your lifting concern.

http://www.brewinabag.com/collections/frontpage/products/pulley-metal-ratchet-250-lbs-capacity

This is assuming that you are brewing in the garage or basement (or your wife will let you put a eyebolt in the kitchen ceiling).  I use one of these for BIAB, works great.

Took me some head-scratching to figure out my response. Well... I'm a wife in a two-wife household... But back to brewing... I'd prefer to find an equipment design more mobile than one requiring a fixed winch. When I can't get to sleep I mentally work on the design of a mobile, highly accessible all-electric brewstand. I ask myself,  if I had very limited mobility, how would I move grain and fluid through this process? It's an interesting workflow problem. Pumps, gravity, and placement seem important to the design.


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22
Will do. My research so far says fair use but I'm playing it fast and loose by doing pictures and such long portions.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
As a librarian, I'd say so far ok, but at some point (and it's a fuzzy line) this will go beyond fair use. It's about the proportion of material used relative to the text. If it were just you and me, no problem.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

23
My opinion is that the default batch size of 5 gallons is an impediment to bringing new people into the hobby and keeping them brewing. While there are small-batch entry-level kits and plenty of ways to start small and keep going that way, the 5-gallon batch is the implicit default batch size, and it drives how long a typical brew day is, the average cost of a homebrew session, and what kind of equipment is needed to manage the process, from extraction to carbonation. It also assumes that there are points in the process where the homebrewer can successfully lift very large quantities of liquid and/or wet grain or acquire the equipment to do so.

The hobby seems much more open to smaller batch brewing than when I started brewing in early 2009, but there's still that 5-gallon mindset. It's as if the bakers on that British baking show had to not just bake really great cake, but bake a cake the size of a small shed.

You're gonna love our new book!

It sounds like it's either on smaller/more accessible brewing, or baking really large cakes :-)

24
My opinion is that the default batch size of 5 gallons is an impediment to bringing new people into the hobby and keeping them brewing. While there are small-batch entry-level kits and plenty of ways to start small and keep going that way, the 5-gallon batch is the implicit default batch size, and it drives how long a typical brew day is, the average cost of a homebrew session, and what kind of equipment is needed to manage the process, from extraction to carbonation. It also assumes that there are points in the process where the homebrewer can successfully lift very large quantities of liquid and/or wet grain or acquire the equipment to do so.

The hobby seems much more open to smaller batch brewing than when I started brewing in early 2009, but there's still that 5-gallon mindset. It's as if the bakers on that British baking show had to not just bake really great cake, but bake a cake the size of a small shed.

25
Equipment and Software / Re: Using a heater
« on: December 30, 2016, 11:29:55 AM »
Since my chamber temperature is thermostatically controlled, I just put a heating pad in the chamber when its not warm enough.

Got out the heating pad, plugged it in to test its temperatures, went away for a bit... one little problem... https://www.flickr.com/photos/kgs/31948393166/

26
Equipment and Software / Re: Using a heater
« on: December 29, 2016, 03:11:30 PM »
Why would you plug the fridge in to the wall? Single stage (heat only) should do well, but a dual stage controller might be better. ...

To address those crazy temperature swings that can have us in teeshirts by mid-afternoon. But maybe not needed?


27
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric Brew In A Can (BIAC)
« on: December 29, 2016, 03:09:04 PM »
The Q&A section on the product page is filling up. I saw a few regarding capacity.

Thanks, I missed that. Some good discussion. I can guess the next version will have markers for smaller batches.

28
Equipment and Software / Re: Electric Brew In A Can (BIAC)
« on: December 29, 2016, 02:24:31 PM »
Yeah, I wonder about the quality too.  They don't show many (any) pictures of the build details.  Williams is a quality outfit IME.  You could send it back if it was poor quality.

I returned something to Williams once and they were fine about it. Another time I ordered a lb of crushed 15L and they sent 20L (or maybe it was the other way around) and they were incredibly responsive about my complaint, even though I noted that it made very little difference in the finished beer.

This is very tempting because I do own a pump, and can see this taking the place of the brewstand I was thinking of building. I have several questions for them (is the thermostat adjustable, can it handle smaller batches, etc.) but I'm definitely interested. I'd also like to figure out if I would be able to lift a basket of wet grain at or near max capacity, which at 16 lbs dry would be about 30 lbs wet, if the guideline that a lb of grain absorbs .1 gallon water is correct (16 lbs grain --> 1.6 gallons water --> ca. 15 lbs; + 16 = 31 lbs).

29
Equipment and Software / Using a heater
« on: December 29, 2016, 02:10:12 PM »
My winter fermentation challenge is that the fridge I have available for fermenting won't maintain a high enough temperature, particularly at night, even with a Johnson controller. The room it's in doesn't go to freezing, but it is cold enough that the fridge never makes it past the high 50s. I use 5-gallon buckets for 3-gallon batches and have a Danby no-freezer small fridge. Am I correct that I'd plug the fridge into the wall for normal operation, plug the heat source into the controller, and put the heat source on the inside wall of the fridge, with the probe taped as usual to the fermenter with a little styrofoam or other padding over the probe?

I'm looking at this:

https://www.williamsbrewing.com/BREWERS-EDGE-SPACE-HEATER-P518.aspx

Thanks in advance.

Good price, if it does what I need it to do. I'm just confirming this setup.

30
All Grain Brewing / Re: Low Oxygen Conclusions?
« on: December 28, 2016, 10:52:15 AM »
Water: "bring to a boil and hold for 5 minutes" -- I usually get my water ready to boil the night before, so this step would be simple enough. Can this step be done a few hours earlier than the brew, or would oxygen sneak back in during the dead of night?

Mash: "drain wort into kettle" -- sometimes I mash the night before, drain into the brew kettle, put the lid on and then turn the BK on as soon as I wake up. Would holding the wort overnight reintroduce oxygen?

SMB -- sodium metabisulfite -- to be clear, this is what's in Campden tablets, right?

I'm not the expert, but I don't think either of those practices is compatible with low oxygen brewing.

I believe some Campden tablets are SMB and some are potassium MB.  According to the original lodo paper, one campden tablet contains 440 mg of SMB.

Thanks. I think I must know a chemist or two to answer the first question.


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No, sorry these are not compatible with Low oxygen. The whole mantra is to get in and out as fast as you can with as little disturbance as possible. You will be fighting against Henry's law.

I'll set aside the early mash question. Thanks for SMB info.

if I preboil 4 gallons of water in a 5- gallon SS kettle, what is the formula for how much o2 is reintroduced over time? If I know this, it should be a simple if casual (aka non-rigorous) home experiment, given other available data and equipment.  The null hypothesis would be that over x hours o2 is reintroduced at quantities below recommended thresholds.


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