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Messages - nateo

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2131
Equipment and Software / Re: mini malter
« on: May 07, 2011, 11:56:53 AM »
I've thought about building something like this:

http://www.nogy.net/malthouse/

I don't know where I'd get unmalted 2-row barley, though. I guess I'd need to plant some barley to go along with it.

2132
All Grain Brewing / Re: Eastern Nebraska Water!
« on: May 07, 2011, 09:22:04 AM »
Aside from the bicarbonate, there's nothing on there that's bad. You're pretty low on everything, with maybe medium amounts of calcium.


Total hardness of 288 mg/L is very hard water.  (their math is wrong, it should read 286)

Yeah, but with that much bicarbonate it's mostly temporary hardness. Boiling or lime would take care of most of it.

2133
All Grain Brewing / Re: Eastern Nebraska Water!
« on: May 06, 2011, 11:19:37 PM »
You'll probably need a lot of phosphoric acid. Dudadiesel.com sells 75% phosphoric for cheap. Aside from the bicarbonate, there's nothing on there that's bad. You're pretty low on everything, with maybe medium amounts of calcium.

I would get martin's spreadsheet to help you out:
https://sites.google.com/site/brunwater/

2134
3463 is a strain I used a lot before I had better temp control. I got good results with just ambient temp ferments. I've used for pretty much every Belgian style, except golden strong. It does a fine job.

My main comparison is 3787, with 3787 being a bit more savory, with more clove, IIRC, whereas the fruit was more apparent with 3463.

2135
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Post-ferment pH adjustment
« on: May 06, 2011, 12:27:53 PM »
Not sure if this is the right place to put this, mods please move if wrong.

Does anyone measure and adjust pH post-fermentation? I know this is something wine guys do a lot, but I was wondering if anyone does this for beer. I've only tried this on a few witbiers. A little acid can really make some flavors pop, and make the beer taste a lot better.

Does anyone have a pH range for finished beers? I've seen ranges of 4.1-4.5 given. Does that sound right?

That's a decent range for most beers. Keeping it no higher than 4.5 is important to keep it from spoiling. Lower can taste better, to a point, depending on the style. It's something you can do to taste. Experiment and see.

I talk about it in my book.  It's discussed in brewing textbooks.

The only textbook I have is Briggs et al. They talk about pH mostly as it relates to taste threshold of different acids, but don't elaborate on how varying the pH on the same beer would alter the flavors.

2136
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Post-ferment pH adjustment
« on: May 06, 2011, 11:28:15 AM »
Thanks Castle, I'll check that out. I could spend months just listening to podcasts, there's so much info out there.

I'd be interested to hear your feedback, if you have some KHCO3 or something similar, if you raised the pH a few ticks on a pint of your Vienna lager, how it would change the flavor profile.

2137
General Homebrew Discussion / Post-ferment pH adjustment
« on: May 06, 2011, 11:03:03 AM »
Not sure if this is the right place to put this, mods please move if wrong.

Does anyone measure and adjust pH post-fermentation? I know this is something wine guys do a lot, but I was wondering if anyone does this for beer. I've only tried this on a few witbiers. A little acid can really make some flavors pop, and make the beer taste a lot better.

Does anyone have a pH range for finished beers? I've seen ranges of 4.1-4.5 given. Does that sound right?

2138
All Grain Brewing / Re: I'm going to do a decoction, damm!t...
« on: May 05, 2011, 02:14:50 PM »
One thing I've done to speed up the process a tiny bit is; after pulling the first thick (really thick) decoction using a kitchen/hand strainer (a la Kaiser's video) I then infuse the decoction to get it up to 160* F asap.  IME, you only need to rest here for ~5 minutes, it doesn't need to be completely converted anyway (you'll get it all later).  Just monitor your pH when infusing the decoction, high pH here would be bad.

Nateo,
that pH of 3 sounds really low; would any breweries attempt to make a Berliner Weisse like that?  Could that explain it?

3 does sound really low. I think they must sour some wort separately, then add that to the rest of the batch to lower the overall pH. The book isn't specific on that.

2139
Ingredients / Re: Crystal vs. Caramunich
« on: May 04, 2011, 08:44:29 AM »
The Cara- prefix is used to designate crystal malts. They're both crystal malts, but not all crystal malts taste the same. I have subbed them interchangeably, and gotten good, but maybe slightly different beer, but I don't really care a whole lot for "style."

IIRC the caramunichs are a bit more biscuity, but it's been a while since I've had them side-by-side.

2140
All Grain Brewing / Re: I'm going to do a decoction, damm!t...
« on: May 03, 2011, 09:56:40 AM »
I thought the ferulic acid rest was pretty important, but then I came across this:

http://braukaiser.com/lifetype2/index.php?op=ViewArticle&articleId=130&blogId=1

2141
All Grain Brewing / Re: I'm going to do a decoction, damm!t...
« on: May 02, 2011, 12:13:33 PM »
Enough flavor to convince everyone it is worth the work - no.

Worth the WORK? Making beer isn't work. It's fun.

2142
All Grain Brewing / Re: I'm going to do a decoction, damm!t...
« on: May 02, 2011, 12:11:31 PM »
From Brewing With Wheat (Awesome book, btw, you should pick up a copy if you haven't already):

Schneider's mash schedule for Aventinus and Original:
95* for 10min
113* for 10min (ferulic acid rest, important for 4-vinyl guaiacol)
122* for 10min
147* for 5min
>Pull 1/3 of mash for decoction
Decoction rests:
152* for 10min
158* for 20min
203* for 5min
>Transfer back to mash to hit:
167*

They also acidify the wort during the boil. It doesn't specify how much, but it says the pH going into the boil kettle is 3.0. Seems low to me, so I'm not sure if 3.0 is the pH of total wort, or if that's the pH of the acidified wort they add to the rest of the wort, in the kettle.

Something I've noticed about a lot of the wheat beer decoction schedules I've found is they have relatively short rests. If you try to hit the temps and times exactly, you'll be very busy and have a hard time hitting them exactly, and some of the steps will go a little long.

I usually use the Boulevard mash schedule, just because it's a little easier to handle:
104* for 6.5min
122* for 25min
145* for 12min
163* for 15min
169* knockout

2143
All Grain Brewing / Re: I'm going to do a decoction, damm!t...
« on: May 01, 2011, 07:43:18 PM »
- Decoction mashing seemed to give me an efficiency bump, which is fairly common from what I understand.  Next time I brew a decocted beer, I'll factor this in when designing the recipe.

My efficiencies with barley-based beers are about 10-15% higher when using decoctions. My wheat beers take a 10-15% hit with efficiency anyway for some reason (probably my grind), so they tend to pretty much balance out.

- Decoction mashing doesn't seem to be very exact.  I felt like I was relying much more on instinct and my ability to problem solve on the fly than on calculations/predictions/etc.  I think it definitely helped to be a pretty seasoned AG brewer.

I actually like that about decoction mashing. It's kind of like cooking without a recipe. I think you get a better feel for your ingredients and how the mash works.

2144
All Grain Brewing / Re: I'm going to do a decoction, damm!t...
« on: April 28, 2011, 06:46:49 PM »
Like infusion amounts for a step mash, I haven't yet found any calculations that are accurate for pull amounts for decoctions in a cooler.  I pull a lot more than Promash recommends just to be on the safe side.

+1 to that. It was mentioned here before, but it's easier to heat more than you need and cool it down before you add it, than it is to dump your whole decoction in the mash, miss your temp, say "oh crap" and scramble to heat up water. Not that that has ever happened to me. . .

2145
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Dry Wine Yeast in Mead
« on: April 28, 2011, 06:42:43 PM »
More yeast will mean a faster, more complete fermentation.

In practical experience, I've never had "too much" yeast. More yeast means more heat, but as long as you control your fermentation temps, it shouldn't be an issue.

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