Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - kramerog

Pages: 1 ... 119 120 [121] 122 123 124
1801
Ingredients / Re: Which two hops should I grow? What are your favorites?
« on: February 01, 2011, 03:42:36 AM »

You didn't say where you are at.  That makes a difference.

Here in Michigan, Cascades>Chinook>Nugget>Centennial>Mt Hood and Ultra.  My Euro varieties don't yield much.
I'm in Chicago.  Soil is clay till, but not acidic like parts of Wisconsin and SW Michigan.  My Cascades yielded 2 lbs in their second year and had excellent flavor and aroma.  Their alpha seemed to be low.

1802
Ingredients / Which two hops should I grow? What are your favorites?
« on: January 31, 2011, 10:16:35 PM »
I grew Cascades last year and was very happy with the beers made with them.  This year I'm planning to plant two more types of hops.  Which two hops should I grow for making American and British ale styles?  Aroma and flavor is the principle reason for me to grow hops, but if I could also do bittering that would be a bonus.

Also what are your favorites?

1803
Kegging and Bottling / Carbonating faster by laying cornie on side
« on: January 31, 2011, 08:09:51 PM »
It appears to me that carbonating a cornie keg laying on its side should make the carbonation go faster as there is a larger surface area between the beer and the headspace.  Could laying the keg on its side have some kind of down side?  Would the petroleum grease I'm using to seal the main hatch absorb flavors?   Thanks

1804
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: High Nitrate levels
« on: January 19, 2011, 06:14:05 PM »
Theres probably a gram of nitrate in an ounce of beef summer sausage.  Drink a liter of beer made with 10mg/l nitrate and you've ingested 0.01g or 1% of the summer sausage.  I'd do both and not worry about it too much.  EPA has a habit of ratcheting down on limits for political rather than scientific reasons.

As noted earlier by Martin, the nitrate level is closer to 45 mg/l.  Also the comment about the EPA is pure bunk.  Nitrates in meat is a preservative so you have to balance its benefits with its drawbacks; something you don't have to do for water because there is no benefit to humans of nitrates in water unless you think spleen hemmorhaging or blue baby syndrome is a benefit.

Mic, I'm guessing you have your own well.

1805
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: January 06, 2011, 06:16:03 PM »

On adding chalk: something I tried once was to crush my dark grains serpeate from the rest. I pladed them in a plastic bag and added the chalk, then shook together to coat the crushed grains. All the chalk seemed to stick to the grain bits...this was then added to the rest of the grains. My thinking was that the chalk would be right at the site where the dark grains would release their acidity,and so aid getting the chalk into solution.

So...does this sound silly? I have no means of testing if it makes any difference...no pH strips, no pH meter.

The brewing spreadsheet assumes that only 50% of the chalk is effective.  Without data, what level of effectiveness should you presume?  Baking soda and pickling lime are clearly superior because they readily dissolve.  

1806
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: January 03, 2011, 06:11:17 PM »
Bear in mind that pickling lime will slowly absorb carbon dioxide from the air and form chalk.  So keep the lime in an airtight container and you might want to throw it away if it is "very old."

1807
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: December 16, 2010, 04:12:41 PM »
My take home is to not to use chalk for raising alkalinity if baking soda will work acceptably, e.g., does not raise sodium excessively.  My reasoning is that the calculation for the contribution to alkalinity from chalk is a crude empiricism that does not take into account a specific users chalk source,equipment, and procedures that could lead to different amounts of chalk being dissolved over the length of the mash.

1808
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: December 16, 2010, 03:58:04 PM »
The "corrected" equation assumes that the chalk and baking soda fully dissolve.  However, Kai points out earlier that the chalk does not fully dissolve and thus the original factor of 158.4 rather than 322 might not be wrong as an empiricism.  However, it is unclear why the discrepancy for the baking soda factor.  Baking soda dissolves well; the solubility of baking soda is 100 g/l at 20 C vs. .015 g/l for chalk at 25 C per wikipedia.

The discrepancy for the baking soda factor is me! Just a miscalculation. 

1809
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: December 15, 2010, 11:34:40 PM »
Looking at  the US spreadsheet, the  formula in cell E30 should be roughly (C27*322 + G27*363)/C23.  In other words, the factors for converting chalk and baking soda to bicarb are both wrong.  Correcting E30 should result in L30 giving the proper result.


The "corrected" equation assumes that the chalk and baking soda fully dissolve.  However, Kai points out earlier that the chalk does not fully dissolve and thus the original factor of 158.4 rather than 322 might not be wrong as an empiricism.  However, it is unclear why the discrepancy for the baking soda factor.  Baking soda dissolves well; the solubility of baking soda is 100 g/l at 20 C vs. .015 g/l for chalk at 25 C per wikipedia.

1810
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: December 15, 2010, 10:21:39 PM »
Looking at  the US spreadsheet, the  formula in cell E30 should be roughly (C27*322 + G27*363)/C23.  In other words, the factors for converting chalk and baking soda to bicarb are both wrong.  Correcting E30 should result in L30 giving the proper result.

Edit: corrected cell refs

1811
Ingredients / Re: Palmer Spreadsheet Error
« on: December 15, 2010, 09:16:50 PM »
After reviewing a water profile created by a brewer using Palmer's Spreadsheet, I found a very serious error that must be corrected.  

The bicarbonate concentration calculated from the addition of chalk is in error.  It appears that the calculation is actually giving the carbonate concentration instead of the bicarbonate concentration.  Since carbonate cannot exist at typical mash pH, it must be converted to the bicarbonate form.  That means that the carbonate concentration should be multiplied by 2.033.  This also means that the alkalinity calculated for the chalk addition in the spreadsheet is also in error and should be multiplied by 2.033.


Without looking at the spreadsheet (if someone pointed out where the spreadsheet is and which cells have the error, I would probably look at it), since alkalinity is usually reported as alkalinity as mg/l of CaCO3, I don't see an error in the alkalinity number.  Perhaps, the bicarbonate concentration is being reported as mg/l of CaCO3 too?

1812
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Best way to prime your bottles
« on: December 02, 2010, 10:32:57 PM »

My fermentations are always at least 6 weeks and my last couple of brews ( one of them did have excessive carbonation, the other was only bottled 3 weeks ago) have been primary only.

Try fermenting for 2-3 weeks only and then fermenting in the bottle under the same temperatures as primary for a week or two.  The yeast after 6 weeks will likely not be healthy resulting in inconsistent fermentations in the bottle.

1813
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Bottling issues again
« on: December 02, 2010, 08:31:05 PM »
For me, the calculator doesn't work so well for English styles; part of it is that at low carbonation levels the serving temp has a huge effect on perceived carbonation levels (very flat to mild carbonation).  My suggestions are have enough yeast initially, do a short fermentation (2-3 weeks), skip the bottling bucket, calculate priming levels at the higher end of the range for English ales, carbonate the bottles between 65-70F until the desired carbonation is achieved and shaking the bottles after a week if the carbonation was not achieved. 

1814
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Best way to prime your bottles
« on: December 01, 2010, 06:26:07 PM »
I think your carbonation problems may relate to fermentation rather than lack of good mixing.  Are you doing long fermentations before bottling?  Do you keep the bottles warm until they are finished carbonating.  Bad biology results in greater inconsistency than bad chemistry.

1815
Other Fermentables / Re: Pectic enzyme - too late
« on: November 10, 2010, 07:41:15 PM »
I have some cider that's just about done fermenting.  Alas, I forgot to add pectic enzyme, so it's cloudy.  Is it too late to add it to the fermented cider?
Normally pectic enzyme is added before fermentation as alcohol interferes with the enzyme.  Whether or not it is too late depends on the specific pectic enzyme and the alcohol concentration.  I don't have any further information that would be helpful.

Pages: 1 ... 119 120 [121] 122 123 124