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Messages - kramerog

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256
Beer Travel / Re: Hey Chicago members
« on: April 15, 2016, 07:29:35 AM »
+1 to Jim's for a Polish with everything along the frontage to the highway.
+1 to Manny's although I've never been there on a weekend.  Part of the charm of Manny's is the politicians.
 Taylor Street for Italian is great although I have not been To Rosals.

You could also go to Goose Island's taproom on Fulton to see what the non-Budweiser brewery is up to.  You could then walk to All Rise on Fulton, which I have not been to, eat at the Publican (reservations needed for this gastropub) and walk to Haymarket Brewery.

Lagunitas' taproom is a must see, plus you'll be amazed to discover that it makes malt-forward beers.  Lagunitas might also have a good band.

I have not heard of Mad Mouse; there are too many breweries and brewpubs to keep up.

257
Beer Recipes / Re: Kölsch spam train
« on: April 14, 2016, 09:54:24 AM »
#7 is beyond what most homebrewers can do.  Stainless steel fermenters are pretty rare for homebrewers.  This probably has something to do with Rheinheitsgebot than with better beer.

Yes, I understand it's Rheinheitsgebot. But in principle it can be done when fermenting in kegs, as I do?
Sure.

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258
Beer Recipes / Re: Kölsch spam train
« on: April 14, 2016, 07:19:36 AM »
#7 is beyond what most homebrewers can do.  Stainless steel fermenters are pretty rare for homebrewers.  This probably has something to do with Rheinheitsgebot than with better beer.

259
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Carboy too full?
« on: April 13, 2016, 07:16:51 AM »
I can't tell by looking at the photo.  The bottom inlet of the fermentation lock should be above the liquid level.

260
Beer Recipes / Re: Brett Kamut Saison
« on: April 12, 2016, 07:34:23 AM »
You have plenty enough pilsener and pale ale malts to convert the kamut and dark munich.  I believe that the Dark Munich is able to convert itself too. 


261
All Grain Brewing / Re: Upper (dulute) limit on Mash Thickness
« on: April 11, 2016, 04:12:20 PM »
Thanks to all, I'll try a mash ratio between 3 and 3.5. I'll also add some US 2-row for insurance.

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262
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: most common off-flavors
« on: April 11, 2016, 11:36:32 AM »
If I did a list like DM, I might put diacetyl up at the top.  I encounter it at bars that are increasing their taps to include non-hoppy craft beers.  While diacetyl might not be the most common one, when I encounter it, it often is spectacularly bad.

Phenolics is probably 4th.  Usually subtle. 

Oxidation is probably fairly prevalent as lack of freshness.  It seems that many people enter bottles filled from a keg into homebrew competitions, and the result seems to be muted flavors rather than off flavors.

263
All Grain Brewing / Upper (dulute) limit on Mash Thickness
« on: April 11, 2016, 07:32:10 AM »
I've mashed at thicknesses of up to about 2.5 qts/lb.  How much higher can I go with English malts before the mash is too dilute to get a good mash?

264
All Grain Brewing / Re: Sparge killing my Gravity
« on: April 11, 2016, 07:27:50 AM »
System and Method:
- Recirculating Pump System with 15g mega pots
- Average recipie was 14lb of grain to 17qt of water
- Mash at 150 for 60 minutes (or till iodine test show good to go)
- Sparge 4g of water at 170 for 15 minutes
- Transfer 6g to boil and boil for about 60min at ~196 (Altitude boil point)
- Boil off about 1g for finale volume of ~5g of wort

Issue is that during the sparge process, I am loosing gravity. When I take a sample post mash, but pre-sparge, I am hitting my targets, but post boil, I am reading a consistent 1.040, regardless of the recipe. I took pre-boil/post sparge samples, on the last two batches, and found that I was losing about .020 gravity points with sparging.

What is happening and how do I fix it?

Are you adding the sparge water before draining some or all of the mash?  In fly sparging, you should be draining the mash until the wort is a little bit above the grain level and then add sparge water to maintain that level.  In batch sparging, you should drain the mash tun before sparging. 

265
Other Fermentables / Re: Degassing
« on: April 08, 2016, 12:11:28 PM »
There's a lot of mead protocols out there.  Which or whose are you using?  I won't be able to give you any help, but I'm interested in answers for the next time I make mead.

266
As soon as you reach a temperature that is safe for your agitating equipment.  I use a plastic impeller.  I'm not sure which plastic it is made from, so I let the temperature drop before putting it in the wort.

267
All Grain Brewing / Re: getting rid of clorine
« on: April 08, 2016, 07:00:37 AM »
I fill my pot the day before, leave the lid off but I don't heat the water beforehand.  I haven't had problems that I know of.  I'm on Chicago water.

268
I figured the purported extra body created by step mashing would be from unfermentable sugars. If its not that, does anyone know what it is? And how the step mash creates it but single infusion doesn't?

Look up glycoproteins, supposedly released at mash temps around 160.  Kai touches on them briefly, and they are mentioned in some other sources I have seen.

Edit: Below is the relevant page from Kai's site.

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Decoction_Mashing

"Narziss [Narziss, 2005] and Fix [Fix, 1999] suggest, that a rest at 158 - 162 *F (70 - 72 *C) benefits head retention and body of the beer though glycoproteides that are extracted from the malt but not degraded by enzymatic activity. Because of that Narziss suggests holding this rest up to 60 min."
Interesting!  I'd read that before and purged it lol. I think my take away originally was that the higher temp step was for body. So apparently glycoproteides are not considered a sugar and would not be measurable with a hydrometer?
Glycoproteins could measurably affect gravity if there was enough of them.  It sounds like they have high molecular weights so a small amount of them can affect mouthfeel.
I have not done blind tests, but I don't really feel the need to. Enzymes work best at different temperatures and a 150F rest isn't doing the best for beta and alpha enzymes. Separate rests are best. But I guess if you don't care to spend a little extra time then don't. That's why this hobby is great, we can put into it what we want to get out of it.
A 150F rest isn't doing the best what? Separate rests are best at what? Why?

I get that the enzymes do different things, but none work in a vacuum. Why is it better to have alpha and beta active separately, rather than together? And how are you sure that alpha isn't having a significant effect down at beta rest range before you ramp up? Modern malts have a crap-ton of enzymatic activity, and even if it's at a lower rate there's a good chance that alpha-amylase is still gobbling away well enough just by sheer enzymatic content at beta rest temps. And frankly, alpha amylase activity will certainly improve beta amylase's effectiveness, by exposing more 1-4 bonds for beta to act on.

I think you have to be really cautious to start extrapolating scientific facts, given how complex the chemistry of wort and beer production is. You can make all the claims you want, but they are really just unproven hypotheses until you back it up with data.


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269
The Pub / Re: Brewers Association Top 50
« on: April 06, 2016, 10:18:25 AM »
Can someone tell me about Minhas Craft Brewery? It didn't seem to fit the category to me, but I've never heard of them.

Minhas' brewery is the old Huber brewery. 

The footnote to Minhas says "includes Mountain Crest and 10 other brand families as well as export volume."

270
General Homebrew Discussion / Tuesday Beer Trivia: More Hops
« on: April 06, 2016, 08:46:03 AM »
Question 3 does not provide the right answer.  Assuming that nothing is lost in drying hops other than water, for the water percentages provide in the explanation of the answer, the correct answer is 4.5.  In drying my homegrown hops, the weight loss is 75 - 80%.

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