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Messages - kramerog

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316
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Astringent New England IPA
« on: October 06, 2016, 01:36:18 PM »
On the salt additions to the sparge water.  I have a HERMS coil in my HLT.  For the mashout I just increase the temp of the HLT while still recirculating.  Then after my mash has hit 168 I then push that 168F water from the HLT over for a continuous fly sparge until my boil kettle hits the right pre-boil volume.  There is always some water left in the HLT.  So would I treat the HLT water for the entire volume that I put in there?  For example, I usually put about 12 gallons of water in the HLT but typically only need to push over 6-7 for the sparge.
I would add the sparge salts to the entire sparge volume.  You can estimate the total sparge volume in advance so as not to dilute based on an estimated grain retention of 1 pint per gallon.

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317
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Astringent New England IPA
« on: October 05, 2016, 08:54:09 PM »
Re sparge water, why not add the sparge salts to your sparge water rather than the boil?  This will have the effect of acidifying the sparge water addressing point #1.  I'm not convinced that points # 1 and 2 are the issue but I also don't what temp. your sparge water is at.

Like the others I think that the citric acid is excessive.

318
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Foam Issues
« on: October 05, 2016, 01:47:49 PM »
Do you have any obstructions or kinks in your lines?  Those will cause foaming problems.

If not I agree with what Hoosier said.

319
Events / Re: I hate ticket sale threads
« on: October 05, 2016, 01:41:30 PM »
Thread of the week!

320
All Grain Brewing / Re: Cloudy beer
« on: October 04, 2016, 03:20:36 PM »

That said, if it was hop compounds that were on the yeasts then you were planning for those to drop out anyway so you would have had to compensate for that in any case.


+1.  This point isn't always understood.

321
All Grain Brewing / Re: Way overshot OG not really sure how
« on: October 04, 2016, 03:08:05 PM »
Sounds like you may have done something right to get an efficiency of 88%, not something wrong.  I would expect a HERM system to give a better efficiency than a single infusion cooler system. 

Since the OG is so high, plan on re-aerating the wort about 12-24 hours after the initial pitch.

322
Drinking water is a pretty unlikely source of microbial contamination as the type of bacteria in the water are unlikely to be beer spoilers.  Chlorine and other disinfactants are not beneficial, but probably not a big deal since not much water went into the wort.

323
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saisonstein Monster OYL-500/BJCP ?
« on: September 30, 2016, 07:26:05 PM »
Re BJCP question, if you have enough lemon character than beer should go as spice, herb, vegetable beer in category 30A.   

324
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Saisonstein Monster OYL-500/BJCP ?
« on: September 30, 2016, 01:29:02 PM »
IIRC, OYL stalled on me.  Anyway, I've decided to stick with DuPont.

Are you using Red X malt?  If the beer fits under dark saison, I don't see why malty would be an issue except that malty tends to be the enemy of dry.

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325
Beer Recipes / Re: Dark ESB
« on: September 30, 2016, 01:12:14 PM »
If I am adding CaCl2 and CaSo4, should I use RO water? Or just use the drinking water I have been using and buffer from there? So far the drinking water has produced some great beers!

I second the vote for English chocolate malt. I would suggest pale chocolate malt for this purpose (around 180-200L).

That's for the recommendation! I think ill use the chocolate malt now due to everyones reccomendations!
I'd go with your drinking water.  If you decide to use a mash pH spreadsheet then I'd recommend RO assuming you don't know the chemistry of the drinking water.

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326
Beer Recipes / Re: Dark ESB
« on: September 29, 2016, 11:02:51 PM »
Where are you located? Once dechlorinated your water might be good as is.
About the only thing I do to my water is make sure there's no chlorine, although I do mix in some distilled water when I brew a Czech pils.
Im in Jax FL, which the water where I live is not good for brewing. it is SUPER SUPER hard. Like 400+ in my area. Other places around jax are OK for brewing from what I have heard.

The use of regional water profiles as a target is largely outdated.  In a nutshell, you want enough calcium for yeast health and for clarification; proper mash pH; and appropriate levels of sulfate and chloride for flavor.  Depending on your water there may not be any adjustment necessary.  What do you know about the water you use?  How have your mashes gone before?

I have not used my municipal water before. I have always used "drinking water" from my supermarket and it has worked well for me. I have never tested/ adjusted PH before for the mash though so I think If I do that it would make a difference. That may be where I start before going down the rabbit hole of adding salts to the water.

If I am not mistaken, the regional profiles are a bit outdated like you said, but sometimes adding some of the water profile additions of the locations water can help elevate certain aspects of the beer. However, I am a novice at this part so I could be way off

From a recipe standpoint, I think everything looks good except for the FG. I'd mash lower and/or sub in some sugar for part of the Maris Otter. I'd want to get this in the 1.010-1.014 ballpark, otherwise it will be a bit too sweet.

That's a good idea. I think I may do that. I agree that that FG may be a bit high.

How about some English chocolate malt instead of roasted barley? Just a thought.

I was wondering about this. The roasted barley was intended to darken it up a bit and add a little roasty character to it. Do you think the chocolate malt will add this as well? I have never used either malt. Im only on brew #7 or 8

To be honest, the only roasted malt I normally use is carafa.

I believe that most english chocolate malts are very dark so it should be able to help you with color and should provide some roast but less than roasted barley. Someone with more experience with these malts in particular can chime in...

At 1-2% I would say it probably wouldn't make a difference but at 4% I am not so sure.
Sounds like going back to store-bought water would be the way to go and then add appropriate amounts of CaSO4 and/or CaCl2 for the style.

327
Beer Recipes / Re: My attempt at one of these NE IPA's
« on: September 27, 2016, 10:30:39 PM »
I cracked open a bottle of this earlier, with it having been bottled last weekend.  Carbonation is a little lacking, no doubt as it's only been in the bottle less than a week.  Taste and aroma wise, I really like it, it's a bit more bitter than I was aiming for, so I'd probably reduce the whirlpool time down to 20mins, but it's still a nice refreshing pint.  Looks wise, it's hazy, not exceptionally so, and less than it was when I took gravity samples.  Overall, I'm pleased with this beer, though I might split the dry hop addition into 2 additions next time, one towards the end of fermentation, and one a week later.  Will try and remember to take a pic to post next time I try one.
If you like the flavor but not the bitterness, reduce your 60 minute bittering addition.

328
Beer Recipes / Re: Dark ESB
« on: September 27, 2016, 10:26:46 PM »
The use of regional water profiles as a target is largely outdated.  In a nutshell, you want enough calcium for yeast health and for clarification; proper mash pH; and appropriate levels of sulfate and chloride for flavor.  Depending on your water there may not be any adjustment necessary.  What do you know about the water you use?  How have your mashes gone before?

329
All Grain Brewing / Re: true effect of pH on finished beer
« on: September 27, 2016, 05:33:38 PM »
Having worked in a chemistry lab, I have not much faith in isolated pH readings taken in home breweries although I understand that there are some reliable pH meters out there.

I am somewhat skeptical as to the signficance of small variations in mash pH on final pH because most of the acidity in finished beer appears to be produced by yeast.  To illustrate this point in a perhaps oversimplified fashion, if the pH of the mash was 5.5 and the finished pH was 4.5, then there the finshed beer has 10 times H+ as the mash.   

330
Kegging and Bottling / Re: sucking out the dry hopped goodness
« on: September 27, 2016, 02:46:36 PM »
A likely culprit is oxidation caused by you pulling the hops out of the corny.  Many of us on this forum including myself leave the hops in the keg until the keg kicks or until another addition of dry hops.

Also I find that the yeast tends to absorb a lot of oil so initial pulls on the keg are very hoppy.  The hoppiness goes down as less yeast is pulled into the beer.  The hoppiness tends to spike up when the keg is almost finished.

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