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Messages - kramerog

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751
Ingredients / Re: Making Invert Sugar: table sugar vs. raw sugar
« on: December 20, 2012, 09:22:50 AM »
I'm talking bout a 1.090 tripel. How much higher gravity do you think you need before you notice a difference in flavor or AA? I will say that incremental feeding (with sugar) has always given me a higher AA.

Perhaps the different osmolarities of different sugars isn't important with incremental feeding as alcohol tolerance is more important.  I was talking/thinking about the difference in yeast stress in worts of the same OG but with different osmolarity.  Anyway, I was just speculating; I have no data.

752
Ingredients / Re: Making Invert Sugar: table sugar vs. raw sugar
« on: December 20, 2012, 08:32:38 AM »
Supposedly invert sugar is easier for the yeast to digest. In my experience there was no difference when I tried it, from the results with regular sugar.

I've heard that before, but I'm skeptical at higher gravities.  I think gravity is how brewer's indirectly measure osmolarity so at higher gravity, the osmolarity makes it increasingly difficult for yeast to regulate their internal environment.  Invert sugars cause higher osmolarity at the same gravity since inverting creates a glucose and fructose from each sucrose.

753
Ingredients / Re: Making Invert Sugar: table sugar vs. raw sugar
« on: December 20, 2012, 08:11:50 AM »

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2009/06/refined-sugar-vs-invert-sugar.html


Interesting article, but it doesn't indicate why you invert sugar rather than using raw can sugar other than removing some minerals.

754
Ingredients / Re: Making Invert Sugar: table sugar vs. raw sugar
« on: December 19, 2012, 12:00:03 PM »
I think you are asking what would the difference be between invert sugar made from table sugar and invert sugar from raw sugar in a beer.  I'm speculating that there won't be much difference especially if the invert sugar is browned during inversion. 

755
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Pressure Kills Yeast?
« on: December 14, 2012, 09:09:00 AM »
I saved some WLP037 slurry for an Irish Ale I was planning to make next week.  I forgot to release the pressure and when I checked on it yesterday the container was pretty swelled.  I released the pressure and put it back.  It was saved from two batches of Brown Ale so there was a good amount of yeast in there. 

Did I just kill them all by death by pressure? 

Dave

Pressure can kill yeast, but not the pressures that brewers encounter.

756
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: IPA time
« on: December 11, 2012, 12:43:48 PM »
Why do amber malt extract and caramel malt in an American IPA?  I say eliminate one and replace with a corresponding amount of pale malt extract.  If it was up to me I would drop out the amber malt extract because I don't know what is in it and because of the possibility that it could be old and have developed extract twang.

757
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2 questions
« on: December 06, 2012, 07:43:31 PM »
Wonder if you could bitter with citrus peels. Anyone?

The dry bitter orange at the HBS looks like whole peel. I've heard wit traditionally isn't orangy because the peel mostly provides bitterness.

True dat.  You could use regular orange peels for bittering.  If you wanted to eliminate the potential for any orange flavor whatsoever you could use a good potato peeler to remove the rind and just use the pith for bittering. 

I think bitter orange has more pectin than regular orange which would be beneficial if you want your beer to be cloudy too.

758
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WTF?
« on: December 05, 2012, 03:26:53 PM »
Two speculative thoughts.  I brew 10 gal batches which I split equally between two carboys.  I often make a single starter which I then split approximately equally between the two carboys.  I often find that one carboy starts and finishes faster than the other which I assume is due to different amounts of yeast.  I don't generally measure the FG of both carboys assuming they finish at the same FG.

Did you see one batch start faster than the other? 

Is it possible there is more air going into the bucket before and during the fermentation causing a more complete fermentation in the bucket?

759
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2 questions
« on: December 05, 2012, 01:36:18 PM »
I think the recommendation is to keep the DP (diastasic power?) over 50 for mashing.  As an example, 6-row barley has a DP of ~150, IIRC, while unmalted wheat has a DP of 0.  Therefore, a mix of 1 part 6-row and 2 parts unmalted wheat would have the minimum DP of 50 for mashing.

760
Ingredients / Re: Dry Hopping research - Interesting
« on: December 05, 2012, 09:01:24 AM »

It's really interesting stuff and I need to do a more thorough read through.  I'm not sure it will have a practical effect on anything in a brewery.  As usual, I want more data ;D

Does anyone want to comment on the higher polyphenol levels with mixing?

762
Ingredients / Re: Dry Hopping research - Interesting
« on: December 04, 2012, 01:52:42 PM »
Section 1.3.4 provides support for the theory that first wort hopping provides a mellow bitterness because of the precipitation of polyphenols with protein during the boil.   This section doesn't address how aroma and flavor survives the boil.

The aroma can come through if certain compounds that are soluble (linalool and geranol) combine with the sugars for form glycosides. The yeast is thought to break the bonds to get the sugars. The compounds left are the refined aromas the German brewers like. The essential oils like myrcene are only had through dry hopping, which the Germans do not typicaly do.*

* Not a chemist but this has been something of interest.

Read the post from 2/16/2012 titled linalool.
http://beersensoryscience.wordpress.com/category/hop-flavor/

Neither article indicates that glycosides are formed in the wort although that is not surprising as the first article is about dry hopping and the author of the second article indicates that most of the research is in German.  Both articles indicate that the glycoside can be cleaved by acid.

763
Ingredients / Re: Dry Hopping research - Interesting
« on: December 04, 2012, 12:29:04 PM »
Section 1.3.4 provides support for the theory that first wort hopping provides a mellow bitterness because of the precipitation of polyphenols with protein during the boil.   This section doesn't address how aroma and flavor survives the boil.

764
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling from the keg
« on: December 03, 2012, 02:19:00 PM »
Thanks, Denny

765
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling from the keg
« on: December 03, 2012, 02:03:12 PM »
What are you going to do with the stopper?

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