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Messages - rabeb25

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16
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 28, 2015, 01:15:30 PM »
Well this post was all about Brunwater... Brunwater is made to read with a room temp sample. That sample is correlated to mash temp. If Brunwater says 5.3 mash pH, its expects you to read 5.3 on your cooled sample because it does/did the guess work(pH temp shifts) for you.  I think you are thinking if Brunwater reads 5.3 at mash you need to read 5.6 at room, right?

Bru'n Water is not reading anything.  Bru'n Water is telling me how much adjustment I need to make to my water supply based on the grist in order to hit a specific room temperature pH.  The sample was read at room temperature. 

I have always targeted a pH of 5.5 to 5.6 at room temperature because I am targeting a mash temp pH of approximately 5.2 to 5.3.  Targeting a mash pH of 5.2 to 5.3 at room temperature places the mash pH at mash temperature at the bottom end or below that at which limit dextrinase is most effective, and far below that at which alpha-amylase and beta amylase are most effective.   My standard single-infusion mash temperature is 148F, which is just below the temperature at which limit dextrinase is starting to be denatured.

Limit dextrinase Optimum pH 5.1 Optimum Temp ~57°C Denatured 65°C
Beta-Amylase Optimum pH 5.4-5.6 Optimum Temp ~62°C Denatured 68°C
Alfa-Amylase Optimum pH 5.6-5.8 Optimum Temp ~72°C Denatured 80°C


Also in looking at your sample picture, you have WAY to much grain in that sample. You should really have a nice clear (free of particles) sample.
[/quote]

What you are seeing is the top of the tumbler where grain managed to sneak over the lip.  The sample was for the most part was clear of grain particles where the actual sensor was submerged.  The sample was taken immediately after mash-in, not after conversion was partially or fully complete and the wort was for the most part clear of starch.  I am testing for the pH at which enzymatic hydrolysis is occurring.
[/quote]

* shakes head, shrugs shoulders* Ok, *and walks away*

17
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 28, 2015, 09:49:56 AM »
The problem Mark is that while you are correct on difference in PH at mash temps vs room temp-all the information home brewers have as reference to mah PH and its impact on the beer is relative to mash PH at room temps. Kai's article is just one example, and this forum has more references than you can count.

All of my references point to optimum mash pH being between 5.2 and 5.3 at mash temperature.

Well this post was all about Brunwater... Brunwater is made to read with a room temp sample. That sample is correlated to mash temp. If Brunwater says 5.3 mash pH, its expects you to read 5.3 on your cooled sample because it does/did the guess work(pH temp shifts) for you.  I think you are thinking if Brunwater reads 5.3 at mash you need to read 5.6 at room, right?

I don't think anyone is disagreeing with you on pH values.

Also in looking at your sample picture, you have WAY to much grain in that sample. You should really have a nice clear (free of particles) sample.

18
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash pH
« on: January 28, 2015, 07:20:55 AM »
http://www.morebeer.com/products/52-ph-stabilizer-1-lb.html

If you're worried about your mash ph not getting to 5.2 you can buy this stuff. Works great!

Does it work for you?  Have you checked your pH after using it?  It not only didn't work for me (and a LOT of others), but it gave my beer weird off flavors.

+10000000 to that.

19
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 28, 2015, 07:17:56 AM »
read what kai wrote again. He says optima are stated at room temp. so by cooling your sample to room temp you are 'removing the ambiguity'. so 5.2-5.7 is optimal AT ROOM TEMP. you are doing the readings just fine.

However, what matters to enzymatic hydrolysis is the pH at mash temperature, not the pH at room temperature.  A pH of 5.6 at room temperature is as pH of around 5.3 at mash temperature. I thought that this information was common knowledge.

It is common knowledge, but I don't think the actual shift is .3, closer to .2...  I am also fully aware of targeting higher ph's fro the beers. I.e. For a pils I target 5.2-3 for a nice crisp finish (also helps the yeast work faster). I also target 5.4-5 for hoppy American beers, just never went as high as 5.6. I think Kai did a test on higher wort pH's, but didn't know if I missed something.

20
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 27, 2015, 11:03:11 AM »
FWIW I thought Brunwater was also slated for room temp readings. I.e. 5.3 in brun water assumes you are measuring at room temp.

Which is why I asked S. why he target a higher end of the spectrum mash ph.

21
All Grain Brewing / Re: Martin B. is the man!
« on: January 26, 2015, 03:01:05 PM »
Any reason why you targeted a higher mash pH?

22
Beer Recipes / Re: Munich Dunkel
« on: January 13, 2015, 08:16:08 AM »
I use amber malty FYI.

23
Beer Recipes / Re: Munich Dunkel
« on: January 12, 2015, 02:55:07 PM »
Yup to that, 99% best munich II, 1 % carafa III. Have one on right now tap now!

I use 34/70 quite a bit with them..

24
All Grain Brewing / Re: 3 Hour Mash What Happens
« on: January 02, 2015, 09:12:40 AM »
It will attenuate very well.

25
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« on: January 02, 2015, 08:13:01 AM »
A friend in my club makes award winning lagers by starting fermentation at warmer temperatures before dropping to what normally people think of as lager fermentation temps. 
I've had his beers and they show no signs of esters.
I don't like to do this, but I can't really argue with his success.

http://brulosophy.com/2014/12/15/the-temp-at-which-we-pitch-exbeeriment-results/

26
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: fermentation schedule for first lager.
« on: January 02, 2015, 08:10:20 AM »
Also for future refernce pay attention to the recommended pitch rates of the yeast at certain temperatures.. They vary dramatically, referencing 34/70 specifically.

This famous yeast strain from Weihenstephan in Germany is used world-wide within the brewing industry. Saflager W-34/70 allows to brew beers
with a good balance of floral and fruity aromas and gives clean flavors and high drinkable beers.
fermentation
temperature
:
9-22°C (48.2-71.6°F) ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)
dosage
instructions
:
80 to 120 g/hl for pitching at 12C – 15°C (53-59°F).
increase dosage for pitching below 12°C (53°F), up to 200 to 300 g/hl at 9°C (48°F)


So for 5 gallons
100g/hl, pitching rate is 19 grams (56f)~ 2 packets
200g/hl, pitching rate is 37.85 (53f)~ 3.5 packets
300g/hl,pitching rate that is 56.78 grams (48f) ~ 5 packets
This is for a modest sub 1.050 beer.


 

27
All Grain Brewing / Re: 60 Minute mash?
« on: January 02, 2015, 06:29:50 AM »
Need to know grain bill.

28
All Grain Brewing / Re: 60 Minute mash?
« on: December 31, 2014, 05:19:35 PM »
Its all about the crush, the finer the crush the fast the conversion can take place.

29
All Grain Brewing / Re: Mash temperature and final gravity
« on: December 28, 2014, 08:58:35 AM »
Testing this with Denny ( I posted this on his wall) I mashed a blue moon clone in the mid 160's, and a pilsner in the mid 150s.

FG on the blue moon was 1.020

Fg on the pils was like 1.015


The blue moon tasted as it always does when it finishes at 1.014, and the pils had too much body, but was not sweet normally Fg for this beer was 1.011.

I kept the Blue moon, and gave away the pils.

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