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Messages - rabeb25

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16
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Pitching yeast with no energy reserves
« on: May 06, 2015, 06:55:01 AM »
Interesting...I just pitched a pint Lager slurry(4/24/15) that was harvested 1/15/15 and stored in the fridge since. I had active fermentation in 6hrs at 53f.

17
This is runoff from a 60%pils, 30%wheat, lager. I like to keep it clean, and my beer thanks me for it  ;)


18
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: May 06, 2015, 05:27:00 AM »

Hefe, turning Kristallwiezen :(


19
Plenty of people swear by brew in a bag, which creates a crazy cloudy wort. So, based on that, I don't think it would affect the final flava flave.

Having made many test batches with BIAB (squeezing, no squeezing, recirc, no recirc, etc) I will not disagree that it works, HOWEVER. I had all my test batches scored (BJCP judges) and they all scored ~7-9 points lower than the same beer brewed traditionally. Just an FYI.

20
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 or 3 Packs Dry Yeast for Lager
« on: May 04, 2015, 05:51:59 AM »
You guys are missing the big picture.  It does not make a darn bit of difference if one pitches 200 billion cells or 400 billions cells in a non-high gravity (i.e., non-hypertonic) solution, especially one that is fermented below the temperature at which most microflora give up the ghost. The maximum cell density for 1 liter is roughly 200 billion cells. A volume of 5.25 US gallons is approximately equal to 20 liters; therefore, the maximum cell density for 20 liters is 20 x 200 billion = 4 trillion cells.  Unless one pitches 4 trillion cells, the fermentation is going to experience a period of exponential growth.  What matters is dissolved O2 and the amount of carbon that is available to the yeast cells. Sugar is carbon bound to water; hence, the term carbohydrate (all of the sugars found in wort are multiples of CH2O). Yeast cells consume carbon.  Given enough carbon and O2, one could fully attenuate a batch of wort by pitching just one yeast cell.

Sure, you CAN...You CAN do a lot of things.. It all matters what your end game is. Do you want to pitch one cell and wait a year for your FG to be hit? Cool! However, I don't, so I pitch proper amounts of healthy yeast, with plenty of pure O2, at the proper pH and "proper" fermentation times.

21
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 or 3 Packs Dry Yeast for Lager
« on: May 04, 2015, 05:45:11 AM »
The way I look at it is this...

Increase the pitch rate or the temp(personally I would do temp). 2 packs would be fine at 53ish(but not below). FWIW, YMMV, and all the other disclaimers.

You have to try pretty hard to over pitch a lager and I can guarantee you, you will never over pitch on the yeasts first fermentation. If your lager yeasts are not chewing though ~12 gravity points per day, you did not pitch enough yeast. For this beer in question, I would be at FG (1.010ish) 4 days from brewday.

Cheers, and good luck!

But don't make the mistake of racking it just because it hit terminal gravity in those 4 or 5 days!  Let the yeast do some cleanup on a lager.  See the Brulosopher lager schedule for the short turn lager technique. You can go grain to glass in 24 days. It really works.

No offense to Brulospher(I read all his stuff, and he will tell you this as well), but he did not come up with this lager method. It is based off the Narziss Method, which has been around for quite some time (50+ years???). I have been doing my accelerated lager method (also based off Narziss, and slightly different from Brulospher for close to 12 years). I have no issues going grain to glass in 14 days (sometimes less) However.. My accelerating method is not to push beer to serving as fast as possible, its to free up fermenters. I have attached my latest lager.. OG 1.050, FG 1.009. FG hit in ~5 days from brew day. Ferment temp 53f. Beer is now going to 30f where it will sits for ~3-5 days and then be kegged.


22
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 or 3 Packs Dry Yeast for Lager
« on: April 30, 2015, 07:27:26 AM »
The way I look at it is this...

Increase the pitch rate or the temp(personally I would do temp). 2 packs would be fine at 53ish(but not below). FWIW, YMMV, and all the other disclaimers.

You have to try pretty hard to over pitch a lager and I can guarantee you, you will never over pitch on the yeasts first fermentation. If your lager yeasts are not chewing though ~12 gravity points per day, you did not pitch enough yeast. For this beer in question, I would be at FG (1.010ish) 4 days from brewday.

Cheers, and good luck!

23
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 or 3 Packs Dry Yeast for Lager
« on: April 30, 2015, 05:55:01 AM »
Then I strongly suggest you look at the manufacturers pitch rate for that temp.. because it GREATLY differs at that low range.

24
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: 2 or 3 Packs Dry Yeast for Lager
« on: April 30, 2015, 05:24:47 AM »
Your Pitch Rate for this particular venture is dependent on your fermentation temp... what is that going to be?

25
Going Pro / Re: The most expensive ingredient in beer...
« on: April 29, 2015, 06:33:47 AM »
Oh, no s***!?? I have been there..

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Going Pro / Re: The most expensive ingredient in beer...
« on: April 29, 2015, 05:49:48 AM »
I don't think our taxes are as high as 40% of our costs, but they definitely add up. We pay federal excise tax on what we produce (fortunately, we are exempt from state excise taxes...for now). Then, we pay sales tax on what we sell at retail in our taproom. Sales tax is levied against us at a higher rate than normal in our city because the product we're selling is an alcoholic beverage. I would assume that's fairly common in most larger metropolitan areas.

We don't get taxed on our raw materials, thankfully. But I would guess that there are import tariffs levied on the importers/suppliers that get passed on to us in the form of higher ingredient costs. The vast majority of our malt comes from overseas, as we specialize in what we refer to as "iconic lager styles" (read: lots of imported European malt). You could count the huge fees we pay to the city and state for licensure (both to operate as a brewer and as a retail taproom) as tax-like fees – the hit we take from those fees is pretty substantial.

edit: Oh, and then we get taxed on our income on both the state and federal level, which is generated from beer sales that have already been subject to excise tax, sales tax or both. Lots of double (maybe even triple) taxation going on there.

Sorry for the off-topic Matt, what is your brewery? ( I am in MN as well) Thanks

27
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: April 27, 2015, 05:22:33 AM »
Some recent beers:

Pale ale:

Traditional Bock:


German Hefeweizen:



28
Pimp My System / Re: Pimp my Fermentation Chambers!
« on: April 24, 2015, 07:08:01 AM »
I lift it out and set it on the top of the Keezer.

29
Pimp My System / Re: Pimp my Fermentation Chambers!
« on: April 24, 2015, 06:16:49 AM »
That's sweet.  Just for reference, how big are those fermenters?  Could you fit a carboy or betterbottle in those fridges?

The buckets are 20.5" H x 12.5" W  , looks like you have about 6" to the bottom of the freezer...if that helps?

Is that 12.5" at the lid on or at the base? Looks like the vessel flares.
I would say thats at the top (widest part).

30
Pimp My System / Re: Pimp my Fermentation Chambers!
« on: April 24, 2015, 05:32:54 AM »
Thanks guys!

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