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Messages - duboman

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: New Member
« on: July 11, 2014, 02:43:50 PM »
Enjoy your retirement and happy brewing!

2
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« on: July 10, 2014, 05:17:11 PM »



Thank you, I can certainly say I learned something today!

Yeah, the info on 1056 especially. Never knew about the Ballantine connection, or the possible reasons for its cold tolerance.

And here I was swirling around in the diploid, polyploid and Aneuploidy, feeling like I've entered the wrong classroom :o

Must've been sitting next to you in class.  ;)
might have been one of THOSE chemistry classes.......

3
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« on: July 10, 2014, 02:59:34 PM »


Thank you, I can certainly say I learned something today!

Yeah, the info on 1056 especially. Never knew about the Ballantine connection, or the possible reasons for its cold tolerance.

And here I was swirling around in the diploid, polyploid and Aneuploidy, feeling like I've entered the wrong classroom :o

4
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Fusel Alcohol and Re pitching?
« on: July 10, 2014, 02:19:07 PM »
I did not know that.  WLP007 makes for a great IPA, I'll have to try S-04 next time.

S-04 = WLP007 = Wyeast 1098 = NCYC 1026 = Whitbread B

Additionally, while people refer to Wyeast 1056 as "Chico," that's actually a misnomer.  Sierra Nevada acquired the strain from Siebel.  Siebel acquired the strain from Ballantine.  The Ballantine family acquired the strain from the UK.

From Siebel's web site (http://www.siebelinstitute.com/services/yeast/yeast-cultures):

"Bry 96

This is a flocculent top fermenting ale yeast from a brewery formerly operating on the East Coast of the United States. It produces a very clean ale flavor which has been well accepted in a number of breweries."

US-05 = WLP001 = Wyeast 1056 = "Chico" =  Siebel Bry 96 = Ballantine

Here's a factoid that most brewers do not know.  Bry 96 is a diploid, that is, it has two sets of sixteen chromosomes, which makes it kind of unique in the world of brewing yeast strains.  Most brewing strains are polyploids, that is, they have more than two sets of sixteen chromosomes.  Aneuploidy is also common in brewing yeast strains.  Aneuploidy in yeast is a condition where the total number of chromosomes is not a multiple of sixteen due to the addition or deletion of one or more chromosomes.

For inquiring minds, Ballantine/Chico has been genetically sequenced.  It was assigned the strain number GSY708 in the following paper: http://genome.cshlp.org/content/early/2008/09/11/gr.076075.108.full.pdf (the genetic features of the strain are discussed in paragraph 2 on page number 8 ).

Thank you, I can certainly say I learned something today!

5
Pimp My System / Re: Redbird Brewhouse - There's Always a Project
« on: July 09, 2014, 02:26:17 PM »
Holy Helga Amanda, that's quite the setup/brewery you've got going there!

6
I'll assume you have the faucet adapter screwed into the garden hose fitting that came with the chiller? If so, yeah those faucet adapters are small and not made for a any regular type of wrench. I've had success using a small compression plier/vice-grip to clamp onto the adapter, actually two, one for each fitting.

7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Thanks
« on: July 09, 2014, 07:02:38 AM »
Glad to hear you found some time to brew! I find the brewing to be more fun than actually drinking the beer sometimes!

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: when is the fermenting finished?
« on: July 09, 2014, 07:01:20 AM »
+1
Yeast don't read calendars so there is never really a firm rule as to when a fermentation has completed, only gravity readings will confirm and as Steve mentioned, temperature, pitch rate and grain bill will determine how the yeast attenuates and ferments.

I'll definitely recommend the first thing to consider is getting good control of your fermentation temperatures as this will greatly improve your beer immediately!

Congrats on getting into this great hobby!

9
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Water volume question
« on: July 07, 2014, 12:53:25 PM »
IIRC you need to verify the equipment as one setting is partial boil and one is full boil. You also need to go into the equipment settings to verify the volumes and losses are correct for your set up

There are also check boxes to select automatic calculations whichever you may or may not want

In addition. I believe you need to use the scale tool to properly switch the equipment profile, not simply change it on the fly once the recipe is put in.

Hope that helps and Mort gave you the basic math for gravity to check things. Also, I'm pretty sure BS uses 45 points for most of the DME although I might be wrong but that would throw you off as well

10

A new hop yard requires three growing seasons before it starts provide a return on investment.  A Saison bubble would more that likey result in a hop farmers being stuck with hops that they cannot sell.  Saison is not a hop-intensive style of beer. 

I planted a new hop yard last fall.  I did not plant the yard because I love growing hops.  Growing and processing hops by hand is a huge amount of work (which is why I dug up my old hills over a decade ago).  I planted the yard in an attempt to avoid having shortages affect my ability to brew.
the other thing I'm seeing is all Bret beers as well as an interest in sours and barrel aged, all on the increase and all lower in hop usage.

11

But there will be a new bubble. Im hoping its farmhouse
that would be awesome, but that's my point, if another variety becomes rapidly popular the same issue will cycle through with demand stripping supply and the breweries encounter the same problem they currently have

12

Breweries usually contract for hops 2, 3 or more years in advance.  How can the grower notify the wholesaler, who would notify the accounts, about hops that haven't been grown yet?
obviously Denny there is no crystal ball but this information can be determined prior and parties can be informed ahead of time if there is going to be a big swing with the current crop instead of surprise on the end users delivery.

13


Sadly this is short sighted on this particular brewer.  AA changes every year (and varies greatly with region the hop was grown in) and relying on a set amount of hops when you cant predict the AA is nuts.  As someone else said, having the flexibility of using different hops is something that people must learn to do, especially in the pro world.

I disagree strongly. Perle have been 8-9% for the last decade. This year they're suddenly 4%. How do you plan for that? Order a bunch more than you think you need? Small breweries have very tight margins. These guys have always ordered about 10% more than they forecast needing, and also trade hops heavily with the other breweries around.

It's not so simple as saying pro brewers need to be more flexible. Having sat in some of those meetings, try telling your distributor that you're changing a recipe. They scream bloody murder! In some states they're entitled to compensation dollars. If you change a recipe much you really need to rename it, or the public also screams. Creating a new name is an expensive proposition.
then shame on the grower holding the contract to not notify those purchasing the contracts!

I deal in nursery stock and my growers always notify about any issues they for see in the coming years about availability, quality, disease, etc so when I design landscapes I have the information I need beforehand to make any necessary adjustments.

I dont disagree.  The producer should be notifying. people.  But then as a business owner you should understand that hops vary year to year and proactively seek out that information.  It really comes down to the hand in hand partnership a beer maker should have with his supply chain.
absolutely, communication and planning are the key to any business relationship and when that breaks down both sides lose in the end.

14
All Grain Brewing / Re: Dramatic swings in mash efficiency
« on: July 04, 2014, 10:49:48 AM »
If everything else in your process is the same but the equipment then that's where the issue lies. IMO 2 batches of 2 completely different recipes is not enough to dial something in.

I would try and brew the same recipe a few times and see what you get. If the same recipe produces the same numbers each time then use that as your efficiency calculation moving forward

15

Sadly this is short sighted on this particular brewer.  AA changes every year (and varies greatly with region the hop was grown in) and relying on a set amount of hops when you cant predict the AA is nuts.  As someone else said, having the flexibility of using different hops is something that people must learn to do, especially in the pro world.

I disagree strongly. Perle have been 8-9% for the last decade. This year they're suddenly 4%. How do you plan for that? Order a bunch more than you think you need? Small breweries have very tight margins. These guys have always ordered about 10% more than they forecast needing, and also trade hops heavily with the other breweries around.

It's not so simple as saying pro brewers need to be more flexible. Having sat in some of those meetings, try telling your distributor that you're changing a recipe. They scream bloody murder! In some states they're entitled to compensation dollars. If you change a recipe much you really need to rename it, or the public also screams. Creating a new name is an expensive proposition.
then shame on the grower holding the contract to not notify those purchasing the contracts!

I deal in nursery stock and my growers always notify about any issues they for see in the coming years about availability, quality, disease, etc so when I design landscapes I have the information I need beforehand to make any necessary adjustments.

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