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Messages - ultravista

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61
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Quad too Sweet - What to do?
« on: November 11, 2014, 03:59:23 PM »
ABV should be approximately 8.9% and near 74% attenuation using WLP540.

Denny - if this was in your pipeline, what would you do?

If I recall correctly, your Rochefort 8 was 1.016-1.018?

62
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Quad too Sweet - What to do?
« on: November 11, 2014, 02:29:42 PM »
morticaixavier - it is Rochefort 8 recipe that was over target by 8 points (1.087 vs. 1.079) and only attenuated to 1.021 fermented w/WLP540. Despite time, heat, and coaxing, it did not budge past 1.021.

I just put it under gas yesterday. Maybe the C02 will add a little 'bite'.

Reading numerous Rochefort 8 threads (here and elsewhere) others were near 1.016-1.018 with similar batches.

Not sure what do to.

63
General Homebrew Discussion / Quad too Sweet - What to do?
« on: November 11, 2014, 02:18:05 PM »
My kegged quad is too sweet. Looking for advice on what to do.

Would an addition of bittering hops level-out the sweetness? I was thinking of drawing off some wort, boiling it w/hops, cooling, and dumping into the keg.

Any ideas/suggestions to take the edge off sweetness?

64
Ingredients / Re: Second Use for Dry Hops
« on: November 07, 2014, 07:57:47 AM »
Got it - a bad idea

65
Ingredients / Second Use for Dry Hops
« on: November 06, 2014, 04:50:55 PM »
Since we're not pulling any bittering from our dry hops, is there perhaps a second use for dry hops?

Would boiling extract bitterness after a week soak in beer @ 40f?

66
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP007 for Pliny the Elder?
« on: November 06, 2014, 07:33:14 AM »
Most (if not all) of the recipes in Mitch Steele's Stone book reference 001 or 002.

67
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP007 for Pliny the Elder?
« on: October 31, 2014, 07:10:48 PM »
sambates - interesting that you say Stone's house yeast is 001. Most Bastard clone variations use 007. I bought 007 to do a Double Bastard. Do you recommend 001 for the Bastard?

In Mitch's book, all of the Stone beers reference 001 or 002 but the CYBI boys say Arrogant Bastard is brewed with 007.

What say you?

68
Yeast and Fermentation / WLP007 for Pliny the Elder?
« on: October 31, 2014, 06:44:40 PM »
I happen to have WLP007 on hand and wondering how 007 would work for a Pliny the Elder clone?

With the massive load of hops (13 oz.), will there be much difference in perceivable esters if using 007 and temperature controlled instead of 001 or another Chico strain?

I am brewing the MoreBeer Pliny clone.

69
All Things Food / Re: Smoked, fermented hot sauce
« on: October 26, 2014, 06:48:04 PM »
Could you use a beer yeast? Smoked pepper hot sauce fermented with a Belgian yeast strain :)

70
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 25, 2014, 10:42:06 PM »
Mine was 1.087 and it seems to have settled @ 1.020.

71
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 24, 2014, 09:44:26 AM »
egg - what was your starting gravity?

72
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 17, 2014, 07:19:08 AM »
If you start chilling you likely won't go any lower.  If you're happy with 1.021 that's fine, but if you think it should be lower I would just wait.

I've left big beers for two months to reach terminal gravity.   Sometimes you just have to be patient.

I haven't left beer on the yeast cake for longer than 6 weeks. It's about 45 degrees now, perhaps too cold for the yeast to continue nibbling.

73
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 17, 2014, 07:09:59 AM »
S. cerevisiae - thank you for your feedback. I rely on Beersmith and rarely run calculations elsewhere. Moving forward, I will check via Excel.

Gravity was down to 1.021 last Saturday and I decided to begin chilling. This week will be 6 weeks since pitching. I believe that it may be down another point or two by tomorrow. Around 77% attenuation.

74
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 16, 2014, 06:59:06 AM »
Here is a response from White Labs regarding autolysis and reducing the gravity.

-------------------------------------
Autolysis will happen as soon as there are dead yeast cells that begin to decay. It is recommended to remove old yeast as early and often as possible to avoid autolysis off flavors, but it can be a desirable flavor characteristic in some products.

For instance Champagne is almost entirely distinguished by autolysis flavors and this is intentional. They age it a minimum of 18 months to incorporate this characteristic. It may be desirable in certain aged beers as well.

As far as reducing the gravity, you are left with very few options. You can rouse the yeast and warm it up, or you can try pitching a new volume of highly active yeast. You want the yeast to be highly active so that it can endure the stresses of starting in a hostile environment. More yeast will only help if you have the available sugars for fermentation. It is likely that the addition of yeast will perform for a breif while and then cease action again. Hopefully this is enough to get you to the target final gravity. If not, you may have to repeat this process.

It is possible that the yeast have consumed all the available sugars and that the remaining sugars are too complex for the yeast to break down. This would be evident if adding more yeast did not effect the final gravity. In this case you would be limited to back blending the beer into a new wort and continuing fermentation as a new batch.

Early stalling is usually attributed to poor cell growth during fermentation. It can be influenced by things such as over pitching, low aeration, or nutrient deficiencies, among other things.
-------------------------------------

75
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: HELP: WLP540 Abbey IV Attenuation
« on: October 15, 2014, 09:15:37 PM »
Beersmith calculates 1.087 > 1.023 as 71.9% apparent attenuation. White labs states 74-82% attenuation.

If Beersmith is telling you that 1.087 to 1.023 is 71.9% apparent attenuation, then there is a bug in Brad's software. 

AA = (O.G. - F.G.) / (O.G. - 1) x 100 (multiplying by 100 yields AA as a percentage value instead of as a fraction)

AA = (1.087 - 1.023) / (1.087 - 1) x 100 = 73.6%  (which is the lower end of the given range for the strain)

Here's a clear cut example of why it is important for all brewers to learn basic brewing mathematics before using brewing software.



From the Alcohol and Attenuation Tool in BS 2.1.

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