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Messages - rjharper

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331
Attempting a re-brew of my gold medal winning blonde ale, then a honey hefeweizen.  Need a couple of session beers for the masses again.  All I have at the moment is Imperial this, Strong that, etc... (terrible position to be in!)

332
Something you might try is to put the kettle in your oven, assuming it will fit. Get it to a boil and then place it on a burner to finish. The oven heats the entire pot, so you don't risk burning or caramelizing the wort during heatup. I would recommend putting a remote sensor in the wort so you know when it approaches boiling, so you can get it out of there before it boils over. I set my oven at 250F for food, because I'm not in a hurry. Not sure what to set it for with wort, but I would suggest starting around 300 -350.

I've never done this with wort, but I do it all the time with pots of food that I need to cook for long periods of time. It beats having to keep stirring to keep the food from burning on the bottom of the pot.

Brilliant!  I never thought of that.

I would not want to try to lift a pot of 8 gallons of boiling wort out the oven and onto a stove top.  That's asking for a trip to the ER with scalds...

Good point, but a lid placed on the top will prevent splashing. Works with a fairly large pot off soup.

Its not just the splashing, its also the weight.  Each gallon weight 8lbs.  Moving 50+ lbs of boiling water anywhere is just an unnecessary risk IMHO.

While you may get to the boil in the oven, there's no guarantee it will stay boiling.  My stove top cant keep much more than 3 gallons at a boil.  Maybe with a high BTU burner on a gas stove you can achieve more, but if this is a rental apartment like the sound of it, I'd wager its the typical electrical stove top.  It's also going to take quite a while to boil water in the oven given the poor heat transfer of air.  I'd rather have a pot sitting on a burner than blowing 400F air on it.

There's nothing wrong with partial boils to keep it simple and faster (unless you're trying to do a pils). Just hop accordingly.

333
Something you might try is to put the kettle in your oven, assuming it will fit. Get it to a boil and then place it on a burner to finish. The oven heats the entire pot, so you don't risk burning or caramelizing the wort during heatup. I would recommend putting a remote sensor in the wort so you know when it approaches boiling, so you can get it out of there before it boils over. I set my oven at 250F for food, because I'm not in a hurry. Not sure what to set it for with wort, but I would suggest starting around 300 -350.

I've never done this with wort, but I do it all the time with pots of food that I need to cook for long periods of time. It beats having to keep stirring to keep the food from burning on the bottom of the pot.

Brilliant!  I never thought of that.

I would not want to try to lift a pot of 8 gallons of boiling wort out the oven and onto a stove top.  That's asking for a trip to the ER with scalds...

334
The Pub / Re: it's that horrifying moment
« on: December 07, 2011, 02:41:56 PM »
That is awesome, I'll need to repost

335
The Pub / Re: What beer opened your eyes?
« on: December 04, 2011, 09:24:55 PM »
I honestly can't remember.  I think it was more like I found homebrewing and then started looking around for good beer.

+1.  Same for me.  Learning how to make beer led me to better beer

336
The Pub / Re: iro·ny
« on: December 01, 2011, 04:48:29 PM »
What about a smart car?  :)


338
The Pub / Re: I need a sword...
« on: December 01, 2011, 02:21:04 PM »
So..... swords huh  ;D ;D

339
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Not Digging This Pumpkin Ale.
« on: December 01, 2011, 10:20:46 AM »
I don't like any pumpkin beer. They can just about all be poured down the drain. Pie yes. beer no. Plain and simple.

I would agree with you here, save for one exception. Good Gourd from Cigar City. I kept going back for that one at GABF.

340
Equipment and Software / Re: Underground wort piping
« on: November 30, 2011, 04:10:24 PM »
75' x 75A (18000W / 240V) needs minimum #6 gauge wire, or 126/0.4 in Europe

Not to be picky, but Europe is mainly 220, so that's a little more than 80A and that's only the heaters. An SO #2, 3 conductor flexible cable has an NEC rating of 95amps and I wouldn't go any less than that for 81 amps.

 Is that all you're needing power for, because even that doesn't leave you with much excess capacity?

I'll meet you in the middle. EU countries apparently harmonized to 230V in 2008. I was going off the UK at 240 where I grew up.  But yes, I wouldn't want to go any lower than 100A. You'll need lighting, pumps etc...

341
Equipment and Software / Re: Underground wort piping
« on: November 30, 2011, 01:45:54 PM »
75' x 75A (18000W / 240V) needs minimum #6 gauge wire, or 126/0.4 in Europe

342
Equipment and Software / Re: Underground wort piping
« on: November 30, 2011, 01:14:39 PM »
Getting back on thread, what kind of distance are we talking about here? Because that's what will determine if 3/4" pipe / tubing and the OP's pump will make it.

As far as water and power, you could look at running an "umbilical" from the basement to the brewery.  You could run permanently fixed power, water (and wort if you want) lines above ground.  This would be closer to the OP's original plan, without digging, and as long as the ultimate outlet of the pipe is lower than the inlet, siphon could still be used.  You could also combine ideas, with a manifold at the brewery, and short length of tubing that lets you select which you;re coming from / going to.  Biggest issue I see is the pain of sanitizing before, and cleaning afterwards.

343
Equipment and Software / Re: oxygenation
« on: November 30, 2011, 09:21:24 AM »
After brewing for six years just shaking a carboy and thinking it really wasnt that important, I tried O2 a few months ago, and I've seen it make a huge difference to the lag time.  I've not tasted any of the new brews yet but I'd expect shorter lag time means healthier yeast, cleaner ferment, less change for other bugs to take over etc.

I use the red O2 cans from Lowes ~$8, and this kit from Austin
http://www.austinhomebrew.com/product_info.php?products_id=2437&osCsid=1a60fd8c77958970a829638970a98dcc

I wont brew without it now.

344
All Things Food / Re: Smoked Salmon Pairing?
« on: November 30, 2011, 08:55:21 AM »
I'd lean towards a good hefeweizen or saison, with some citrusy notes to compliment the delicate flavor of the fish.

EDIT: Is it hot or cold smoked?

345
Equipment and Software / Re: Underground wort piping
« on: November 30, 2011, 08:53:14 AM »
Agree with previous posts that heat dissipation through the ground probably wouldn't be fast enough, nor the ground cold enough.

I would also consider line restriction and wort loss.  Are you running 10' or 100'?  Uphill or downhill? If you run too narrow a pipe you'll come up against flow restriction.  But run too wide a pipe and you'll lose a lot of wort in the pipe once your pump runs dry, unless you can rely on downhill siphon.  For example, the dead volume in 50' of 1" pipe is just shy of 2 gallons.

As much as I love the ambition, and the coolness, it's probably cheaper, easier and more flexible to put fermenters on a dolly.

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