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Messages - rjharper

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46
Beer Recipes / Re: Smoked American Pale Ale
« on: March 30, 2015, 10:05:57 AM »
They have the Cherry and now a Mesquite smoked malts on their web page. I have not used the mesquite.

I haven't used the mesquite malt from Briess but if it is anything like what I have created at home smoking malt with mesquite then a little will go a very long way.

That matches my feeling on smoking meat with mesquite. A friend usually mixes it with oak.

Yeah, mesquite is pretty assertive. I sometimes mix it, too.  While I like it in Bbq, I'd probably use little or none in beer.

I stick with hickory or apple when I'm cooking.

For the recipe I ended up going with 10% smoked malt. Smelled strong in the mash but not so much at the end of the boil. Still, this is round 1 of the recipe, and we'll see where it goes from here.

47
Beer Recipes / Re: Smoked American Pale Ale
« on: March 28, 2015, 12:52:23 PM »
Thanks for all the input. I gave the briess cherrywood another sniff, and tasted a few. Maybe it was too cold last time because now I'm definitely picking up the smoke. I'll give the home smoked malt a go next time, but I think for now since I want to knock out the brew tomorrow I'll stick with the briess but dial it back to 10%. I'll look into the smoked wheat too though.

48
Beer Recipes / Smoked American Pale Ale
« on: March 28, 2015, 07:40:44 AM »
I tried a smoked American Pale Ale at a really cool little brewery in Oslo earlier this year, and I'd like to try to recreate the style. I'm thinking to dial back the bitterness and finishing hops a little to let the smoke come through, and I'm going to use Nugget and Summit in place of my usual 'C' or new varietal citrus / tropical fruity hops.

I've got Briess Cherrywood Smoked Malt in stock.  I don't smell any strong smoke notes coming off it, but maybe its a grower, not a shower. How does this recipe look? I'm undecided on 10-20% smoked malt. Definitely less dry hopping than I'd normally go with but again, I want the smoke to come through and not fight an overly hoppy American pale.

6.5 lbs 2-row (65%)
2 lbs cherrywood smoked malt (20%)
12 oz C60 (7.5%)
12 oz white wheat (7.5%)
0.5 oz Nugget @ 30 mins 19 IBUs
0.5 oz Summit @ 30 mins 21 IBUs
1.0 oz Nugget @ 0 mins
1.0 oz Summit @ 0 mins
Safale US-05
0.5 oz Nugget @ dryhop
0.5 oz Summit @ dryhop

Mash @ 150
OG 1.053

49
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Cold Crashing Starter
« on: March 20, 2015, 04:27:55 PM »
Now, if I forget to make a starter ahead or don't have time. Then I make a starter using wort and pitch the entire thing at high krausen...
I have been reserving this in my toolbox for a while. Such a smart and easy trick.

I've done this a few times. Quite frankly, it's tempting to make this my normal practice.

50
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Liquid vs dry yeast?
« on: March 19, 2015, 12:00:30 PM »
Mark, or anyone else, do you have background on the origin of S-189?

I believe that the strain originates from the Hürlimann Brewery.

Yeah, that's what I've found also.

If I ever do a 14% lager I will use this yeast.   ;)

Sounds like an excellent strain for Baltic Porter then

51
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Liquid vs dry yeast?
« on: March 18, 2015, 09:08:12 PM »
What's interesting about W-34/70 is that it is not a strain.  It's the 70th isolate of strain number 34.  Hefebank Weihenstephan also offers W-34/78.   

http://www.hefebank-weihenstephan.de/strains.html

What's an isolate you may ask?  Well, it's a single well-isolated colony from a plate.

The yeast culture in the photo shown below is from Scottish and Newcastle's Tyne Brewery.  The well isolated round colonies in the lower right-hand quadrant of the plate are isolates because each one was formed by the offspring of single yeast cell.  Yeast cells can undergo mutation in use.  Periodic isolate selection can lead to the selection of cultures that have slightly or radically different performance characteristics.



I love science :)

52
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Liquid vs dry yeast?
« on: March 18, 2015, 07:36:37 AM »
For a neutral yeast, espcially for American ales, you can use dry US-05 interchangeably with WLP001 or WY1056. Similarly for neutral German lagers, W-34/70 is the same strain as WLP800 and WY2001.

For European ales though (English, Belgian, German, Flemish etc) I think there's a lot more variety to be had with the range of liquid options.

The 34/70 is usually said to be the WLP-830 and Wyeast-2124. It is the most widely used lager yeast since it was the one that Ludwig Narziss taught his students at Weihenstephan brewing school.

I stand corrected. 34/70 is my go to lager yeast.

53
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Liquid vs dry yeast?
« on: March 18, 2015, 06:40:04 AM »
Dry yeasts are getting better.  Just saying.  I used Abbaye yeast for a golden strong and it was very good.  Yes I love liquid yeasts and do starters, but there are some dry yeasts that are perfectly fine.

I'd not seen many good reviews of that strain, so that's encouraging.

54
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Liquid vs dry yeast?
« on: March 17, 2015, 05:42:33 AM »
For a neutral yeast, espcially for American ales, you can use dry US-05 interchangeably with WLP001 or WY1056. Similarly for neutral German lagers, W-34/70 is the same strain as WLP800 and WY2001.

For European ales though (English, Belgian, German, Flemish etc) I think there's a lot more variety to be had with the range of liquid options.

55
Kegging and Bottling / Re: handling kegs not under pressure
« on: March 14, 2015, 08:48:07 AM »
If I'm filling a keg for later, I'll push it to 35-40 psi then disconnect.  Some of the co2 will dissolve, but there will be enough head pressure after equilibrium to hold the seal.

56
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Carbing Guinness clone with nitro
« on: March 13, 2015, 11:45:23 AM »
1) Do you know what mix your nitrogen cylinder is at? Or do you have all nitrogen?

2) If you have 100% nitrogen, then just carb with CO2 to 2 volumes, then push it with nitrogen for serving.

3) If it's a mix, then you'll have to do a bit of math to figure out what pressure to carbonate at.

If using 100% CO2 first, carb to half the typical volume you would for straight CO2. If you overcarb (to regular volumes) then push on nitro you'll get too much foamy head with big gnarly bubbles trapped. You want that silky crema on top, so carb to 1-1.2 vol max then switch to beer blend.

If connecting straight to beer blend just set and forget at 25-30 psi. This will take longer to carb even to the lower volume since the CO2 is only partial headspace.

57
Pimp My System / Re: Compact Fermentation Chamber Heater
« on: March 12, 2015, 10:54:54 AM »
I put an aquarium heater in a pitcher of water, foil over the top to minimize evaporation, does the trick.

cool idea

Doesn't this encourage mold growth?

58
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Long Draught line balancing, Please help!
« on: March 12, 2015, 08:01:46 AM »
You are doing an apples to orange comparison because of the 5 foot drop. 

Also the Draught Quality manual (http://www.draughtquality.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/DQM_Full_Final.pdf) has the following resistances:
3/16: - 3 ft/psi
1/4" - 0.85 psi/ft
5/16" - 0.4 psi

Yes you can use 3/16" at the end to create the desired pressure drop.  Anyway check out the manual.

I think that the claimed 3 psi/ft drop for 3/16" is vastly overrated. I typically see closer to half that. I'm running 8' lines at 14 psi for a smooth pour.

59
Events / Re: How is the hotel for NHC San Diego?
« on: March 11, 2015, 07:47:03 PM »
I'm a hilton frequent 'flyer' so we're staying at the Doubletree and bussing it probably.

60
Ingredients / Re: Pellets vs whole hops
« on: March 10, 2015, 01:29:32 PM »
I pretty much use whole hops exclusively; however, then again, I also use a false bottom in my kettle.  Whole cones, a false bottom, and an immersion chiller allow one to drain clear wort from one's kettle.  Whirlpooling helps to reduce, but does not completely eliminate hop material from entering one's fermentation vessel when using a ball valve-equipped kettle.  A good compromise that I have seen used in several craft breweries involves using pellets in the boil and whole cones in a hop back while casting out the wort.

Just dont combine whole hops and pellets if you have a false bottom. Everytime I do that I get a total clog!

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