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Messages - bigchicken

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61


But am I the only one who thinks that APA/IPA is actually hard? In my area, it seems like if you can brew a passable IPA or APA, you'll be a shoo in for a gold medal. Almost makes me want to brew one!

I've had this too. I can make a good Blonde, but add some hops and I don't know what happens. I've only made one good IPA to date and it was an extract batch.
I also have a rough time with Browns and Dunkleweizen. Always watery or over powering.
Easiest beers to me have been Old Ale (won a gold on an only 3 month old version- first comp ever entered) and Stouts.

I should note I don't lager or do sours. Nor do I pay attention to water chemistry. I knew I'd be moving so never dialed in on the water. I figure that lesson will be coming soon.

62
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Fruit flies in airlock
« on: October 10, 2013, 07:24:32 AM »
At what point would you all be concerned with a fruit fly caused infection? I had one little demon fruit fly crash into my rehydrated yeast this weekend and instantly drown I pulled him out, but pitched the yeast anyway. I had no other yeast option other than bread. Its a Saison fermenting at 75. Fermentation was active in only 3 hours.
Surprisingly, the fruit flies are avoiding my carboy.

So you knowingly pitched a vinegar fly into your wort? Sorry, but there's no way I would do that! They're covered with acetobacter.
Just one fruit fly will instantly give a funky taste to a glass of beer. I drink from a lidded stein in fruit fly season.

But acetobacter requires oxygen, so assuming fermentation starts quickly and oxygen is kept out after - one fruit fly probably won't have an effect. I'm suspicious about one fruit fly turning a glass of beer funky. That one might be all in your head. There just isn't enough time for acetobacter to turn beer unless it sits for a few days.

Thanks. I'm hoping it was a "clean" fruit fly! This thread definitely has me inspecting all my equipment and rethinking my processes.

63
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Fruit flies in airlock
« on: October 09, 2013, 06:49:16 PM »
At what point would you all be concerned with a fruit fly caused infection? I had one little demon fruit fly crash into my rehydrated yeast this weekend and instantly drown I pulled him out, but pitched the yeast anyway. I had no other yeast option other than bread. Its a Saison fermenting at 75. Fermentation was active in only 3 hours.
Surprisingly, the fruit flies are avoiding my carboy.

64
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Commercial Saisons
« on: October 06, 2013, 07:29:12 AM »
I think Funkwerks out of Ft Collins just made it into Nebraska. Their regular Saison got a gold at the GABF last year - and they won small brewery of the year.

You are correct sir. I'm going to start having my sister run me some FW across the state line when she moves up there.

FWIW, Tank 7 is still the ultimate saison for me.

Looks like I'll be making another trip to the store to try to find the Funkwerks. I did get to try a Saison fermented in a gin barrel at Upstream Brewery recently. It wasn't great, but not bad either. So far Tank 7 is the one I'm liking the best.

65
Hop Growing / Re: Freezing Fresh Hops
« on: September 14, 2013, 08:56:50 AM »
I've frozen Chinook and Nugget right off the vine with little to no loss in quality after 3 months. No food saver, just in freezer bags. Now I let a small bag go in the freezer that I forgot about. They turned black at around 6 months, so got tossed. I never did get a vegetal taste or aroma from mine. I didn't thaw them until the morning of an afternoon brew day.

66
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Commercial Saisons
« on: September 10, 2013, 10:49:47 AM »
So big chicken, whereabouts do you reside, I 'm in the western side of the state.

I recently moved to the big city of Lincoln.

Speaking as a fellow Nebraskan, Tank 7 and Funkwerks are the 2 best commercial saisons inside the state borders, IMHO. Others would be Goose Island Sofie, Sierra Nevada Ovila, and Hennepin.  I don't particulary care for the DuPont 'skunk' but worth a try if you have never had it.

Keep the grist simple and spices small.  The spice should come more from the yeast.  Good luck.



I just tried a bottle of DuPont in the green bottle. Definitely had some skunk in there. I'm really liking the Tank 7. I'm still working on a recipe, but I'm taking your advice of letting the yeast work its spicy magic.

67
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Commercial Saisons
« on: August 31, 2013, 07:35:07 AM »
Thanks for all the responses! I'm pretty sure I've had a bottle of Tank 7 before, just can't remember what it was like. I'll be looking around for it and the other suggestions too.

68
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Commercial Saisons
« on: August 29, 2013, 07:47:48 PM »
try hennepin by ommegang.  its one of my favorites.  or wait 3 months, wont it be cool in nebraska

Oh yeah, I'll be brewing plenty this winter. Unfortunately, my stock is low enough now I need to (gasp!) buy beer! I can't stand it!  :D
I figured the heat would be a good enough excuse to try to brew something different than I'm used to brewing.

69
Commercial Beer Reviews / Commercial Saisons
« on: August 29, 2013, 05:31:18 PM »
My new home has no basement, so I plan to try brewing some beers I can ferment on the high side, such as a Saison. Problem is, I can't remember having a commercial version before. I want to find some versions to try that I can then try to brew. So, what are your favorite Saisons and have you found or created a comparable recipe?

70
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Bottle cap discovery
« on: August 05, 2013, 03:28:38 PM »
Thanks for posting this! Gives me more reason to buy them. I always thought they were overpriced, but this changes my thinking.

71
Equipment and Software / Re: Do I really need a wort chiller?
« on: June 08, 2013, 07:58:10 AM »
I sanitize frozen 16oz bottles to drop them in to cool the wort from 100F to pitching temps for either ales or lagers.

I've been meaning to ask about this. How many bottles does it typically take you to chill 5 gallons? I have a bunch of old PET bottles that would be perfect for this.

72
Equipment and Software / Re: Plastic carboy
« on: May 26, 2013, 08:33:58 AM »
In my opinion, the downside of the plastic carboy is cleaning it. I've had gunk that wouldn't come off after 24 hour soakings with PBW. A brush really isn't an option due to scratch potential.

73
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast temp shock
« on: May 19, 2013, 07:28:30 AM »
Pay attention to your sanitation and they can sit there basically indefinitely. If you're getting antsy you can also attemper the yeast by adding a little cool wort, stirring, and repeating a few times.

+1
I rehydrate in a glass or measuring cup. I cover the top with plastic wrap and often let it set 1-2 hours. I sanitize whatever its in.

74

[/quote]

For the 6.5 carboy I am using now (just started fermentation) how much krausen would be created? The reason I ask is that so far it doesn't look like it will go any higher than the 5 gallon mark.
[/quote]
This varries greatly. I like many others on this forum have blown out an airlock on a 5 gallon batch using a 6.5 gallon carboy or bucket.  Your best bet is to get some additional large fermentors.

75
Equipment and Software / Re: Cleaning of equipment
« on: May 03, 2013, 05:20:38 PM »
Of course it isn't free... You have to buy it ;D.
Seriously, your lhbs should have PBW or B-Brite available, which is a similar type product, but geared towards brewing equipment. I use dish detergent on most of my equipment, with no ill effects. Just be very thorough when rinsing. But for beerstone and hard to scrub areas, nothing beats the PBW.
+ 1
I use the exact same process.

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