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Messages - dllipe

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31
And are there any other benefits than having a nice pretty looking clear beer?

Thanks.

32
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Filtering finished beer
« on: March 12, 2012, 01:08:37 PM »
Oxidation is a big cause of flavor instability and off flavors.  I always rack on a blanket of CO2. So yes, purge the keg with CO2. I send it down the dip tube pushing the air out the top. Takes only couple psi to run thru a 5 micron filter - your gas use will be minimal.

So once you run the co2 into the keg, you vent, then take the top off and stick your racking tube down at the bottom or do you transfer some other way?  Thanks.

If you attach a beer out qd to the end of the racking tube you can push the beer down the beer out dip tube.

Ahhhhh, that makes sense.  I'm going to start doing that.

33
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Filtering finished beer
« on: March 12, 2012, 12:16:47 PM »
Oxidation is a big cause of flavor instability and off flavors.  I always rack on a blanket of CO2. So yes, purge the keg with CO2. I send it down the dip tube pushing the air out the top. Takes only couple psi to run thru a 5 micron filter - your gas use will be minimal.

So once you run the co2 into the keg, you vent, then take the top off and stick your racking tube down at the bottom or do you transfer some other way?  Thanks. 

34
You have done more research on it than I ever have, so I would say your calculations are good. My home is in Thornton at about 5800 ft. Where did you get the gas mix?

My wife got it at General Air as a Christmas present.  She said they were really nice and helpful as she didn't know it was actually a mix of gasses, nor did I at the time.  They're on Zuni in Denver but I think they have other locations around the front range. 

35
I'm not familiar with what to add above sea level.  However, I would go with what you read and take a sample after 2 days to see how it's coming along.  It also helps remove any sediment that has accumulated.  Play with it for 2 days thereafter and you should be just fine.

Dave

Thanks Dave

36
Hey everyone.  I kegged my first beer last night and I'm pretty pumped.  It's an Irish stout that we'll be serving for St. Patty's Day.  I've done a lot of reading on this Forum and I belive have all my questions answered but wanted to summarize them here and make sure.  Here's what I have:
1) Irish Stout
2) 40 degrees in Keezer
3) in Boulder, CO at about 5,500 feet
4) pushing/carbing with beer gas 75% nitro 25% co2
5) I have a stout faucet
6) Wanting about 2 volumes of co2 (I figure if it's too much carbonation I have time to take some out)

My question is the pressure.  Looking at the Kegorators.com carbonation chart I apply 7psi at 40 degrees for about 2 volumes, however, I read on the BA's quality manual that you add 1 psi per 2000 feet above sea level which would add about 2.75 psi for 9.75 psi pressure and since I'm 25% co2 I multiply times 4 and get 39 psi.

Is my reasoning sound here?

Also, if I leave it alone, how long should I wait to pour a pint and check it out?

As always, thanks.

37
If you're worried, you can normalize it a bit by building a cheap fermentation chamber, basically a box .  It won't be as subject to fluctuations over a short time scale.  No need for any temp control.

But I like buying new stuff :)

38
If you're worried, you can normalize it a bit by building a cheap fermentation chamber, basically a box .  It won't be as subject to fluctuations over a short time scale.  No need for any temp control.

Or put the fermenter in a tub of water. That will even out the temperature swings, but also knock a few degrees off. So it might be too cool, depending on the ambient temperatures.

Just out of curiosity, where do you live that you can ferment in the basement during the winter?

I'm in Boulder.  My house is only a few years old and has great insulation.  My basement is unfinished and the furnace is down there so it is probably a few degrees warmer in the winter than summer as there are AC vents as well that add cool air.

39
I live in Colorado and have a basement where I ferment.  I've only done ale's so far and the basement temp always stays within the tempreture margin of the yeast, however, I know it fluctuates throughout the day.  Overall I've been pleased with the beers we've made.

I have an extra fridge that I can use for a fermentation chamber with the purchase of a temp control switch and I'm wondering if I can expect an improvement by fermenting my beers in there knowing I can hit and hold a specific temp.  Of course I'll have to use it for lagers but I was wondering if it would benefit the ales too.

Thanks.

FYI, my wife surprised me with a 4 tap keezer for christams with co2 and nitro capabilities so I really need to get to work filling up some kegs.


40
Equipment and Software / Is Beersmith a good tool?
« on: November 10, 2011, 11:21:46 AM »
About me:
- started brewing April of this year and made about 7 extract batches before switching to all grain
- Drinking second AG batch now, first one turned out drinkable, second one is definitely better
- 3 other AG batches are in various stges of fermentation and were kits

I just downloaded the 21 day trial version of Beersmith and it looks really cool and seems to have some great tools, especially for building your own recipes.

I wanted to know how many other brewers out there use Beersmith (or any other software package) and how much utilization/value you get out of them.

Cheers!

41
Ingredients / Re: When to add fruit?
« on: November 07, 2011, 03:46:10 PM »
Yes, I would do exactly that.
Freeze them now, when the stout is done with primary thaw them and add to secondary. It will kick off some additional fermentation activity so give it time.


Thanks.

42
Ingredients / When to add fruit?
« on: November 07, 2011, 03:32:57 PM »
Hey everybody.

My friends and I are wanting to try making an all grain chocolate rasperry stout.  I wanted to know at what step do you add the rasperries (can you add them at some point in the boil or just in secondary or some combo) and in what manner do you add them (whole rasperries or a puree or some other way)?

As always, thank you.

43
Bottling got old quick.  I am about to receive a kegging system (1 corny keg, regulator, co2 tank) Now I just need to learn how to do it.  Where can I find some good information on kegging such as the proper amount of pressure for carbonating and serving, line size/length plus any other important factor that needs addressing and troubleshooting techniques?

I have a small fridge in the basement where I'll keep it so no kegerator or keezer yet.

Cheers!

44
Yeast and Fermentation / Saving the yeast cake
« on: September 28, 2011, 11:47:07 AM »
I've seem a few videos where brewers save the yeast cake from primary and use it for future batches/starters.  What are the primary benefits to this?  Also, I thought that the yeast by this time would be worn out, how does this add value to a yeast starter?

45
Equipment and Software / Re: Rubbermaid vs. Igloo Cooler
« on: August 01, 2011, 03:43:37 PM »
Recipe used 33 lbs grain--filled it up to the 8.5 gallon mark when dry).  Talk about a thick mash.


I'm glad I read this.  I am doing my second AG brew this weekend with a 10 gallon round Igloo and have a 21.5 lb grain bill.  Did you add the grains first and then the water on this one?

I usually do.  If for no other reason to make sure that I can get all the grains in the 10 gallon Igloo mash tun before adding water.  You'll find there's more than one way to do this step and they all have their pro's and con's.

You'll be fine with a 21.5 lb grain bill, just don't have the mash go above the 9 gallon mark in order to make it easier for you to stir w/o making a mess

That's good to know.  I did 1.25/lb which was 6.75 and everything worked out great.  It's good to know the 9 gallon mark is the max.  Now, I just need (learned the hardway) that I needed a blow off tube.

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